Valid HTML 4.0! Valid CSS!
%%% -*-BibTeX-*-
%%% /u/sy/beebe/tex/bib/master.bib, Thu Nov 11 09:16:24 1993
%%% Edit by Nelson H. F. Beebe <beebe at plot79.math.utah.edu>
%%% ====================================================================
%%% BibTeX-file{
%%%     author          = "Nelson H. F. Beebe",
%%%     version         = "4.05",
%%%     date            = "17 April 2019",
%%%     time            = "17:20:05 MDT",
%%%     filename        = "master.bib",
%%%     address         = "University of Utah
%%%                        Department of Mathematics, 110 LCB
%%%                        155 S 1400 E RM 233
%%%                        Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0090
%%%                        USA",
%%%     telephone       = "+1 801 581 5254",
%%%     FAX             = "+1 801 581 4148",
%%%     URL             = "http://www.math.utah.edu/~beebe",
%%%     checksum        = "51812 107844 553508 5115693",
%%%     email           = "beebe at math.utah.edu, beebe at acm.org,
%%%                        beebe at computer.org (Internet)",
%%%     codetable       = "ISO/ASCII",
%%%     keywords        = "bibliography; BibTeX",
%%%     license         = "public domain",
%%%     supported       = "yes",
%%%     docstring       = "BibTeX bibliography for NHFB's personal
%%%                        collection of books and miscellaneous
%%%                        references.
%%%
%%%                        At version 4.05, the year coverage looked
%%%                        like this:
%%%
%%%                             1837 (   1)    1898 (   0)    1959 (   2)
%%%                             1838 (   0)    1899 (   0)    1960 (   7)
%%%                             1839 (   0)    1900 (   0)    1961 (   7)
%%%                             1840 (   0)    1901 (   0)    1962 (  10)
%%%                             1841 (   0)    1902 (   0)    1963 (   9)
%%%                             1842 (   0)    1903 (   0)    1964 (  16)
%%%                             1843 (   0)    1904 (   0)    1965 (  13)
%%%                             1844 (   0)    1905 (   0)    1966 (  12)
%%%                             1845 (   0)    1906 (   0)    1967 (   3)
%%%                             1846 (   0)    1907 (   0)    1968 (   9)
%%%                             1847 (   0)    1908 (   0)    1969 (   9)
%%%                             1848 (   0)    1909 (   1)    1970 (   5)
%%%                             1849 (   0)    1910 (   1)    1971 (  10)
%%%                             1850 (   0)    1911 (   0)    1972 (   8)
%%%                             1851 (   0)    1912 (   0)    1973 (   8)
%%%                             1852 (   0)    1913 (   0)    1974 (  18)
%%%                             1853 (   0)    1914 (   0)    1975 (   8)
%%%                             1854 (   1)    1915 (   1)    1976 (  22)
%%%                             1855 (   0)    1916 (   0)    1977 (  18)
%%%                             1856 (   0)    1917 (   0)    1978 (  23)
%%%                             1857 (   0)    1918 (   0)    1979 (  24)
%%%                             1858 (   0)    1919 (   0)    1980 (  17)
%%%                             1859 (   0)    1920 (   0)    1981 (  29)
%%%                             1860 (   0)    1921 (   0)    1982 (  29)
%%%                             1861 (   0)    1922 (   0)    1983 (  37)
%%%                             1862 (   0)    1923 (   1)    1984 (  39)
%%%                             1863 (   0)    1924 (   0)    1985 (  43)
%%%                             1864 (   0)    1925 (   2)    1986 (  54)
%%%                             1865 (   0)    1926 (   0)    1987 (  67)
%%%                             1866 (   0)    1927 (   0)    1988 (  73)
%%%                             1867 (   0)    1928 (   0)    1989 (  60)
%%%                             1868 (   0)    1929 (   0)    1990 (  87)
%%%                             1869 (   0)    1930 (   0)    1991 (  63)
%%%                             1870 (   0)    1931 (   0)    1992 (  66)
%%%                             1871 (   0)    1932 (   0)    1993 (  56)
%%%                             1872 (   0)    1933 (   3)    1994 (  49)
%%%                             1873 (   0)    1934 (   0)    1995 (  36)
%%%                             1874 (   0)    1935 (   2)    1996 (  47)
%%%                             1875 (   0)    1936 (   2)    1997 (  55)
%%%                             1876 (   0)    1937 (   1)    1998 (  48)
%%%                             1877 (   0)    1938 (   2)    1999 (  63)
%%%                             1878 (   0)    1939 (   1)    2000 (  47)
%%%                             1879 (   0)    1940 (   4)    2001 (  35)
%%%                             1880 (   0)    1941 (   0)    2002 (  30)
%%%                             1881 (   0)    1942 (   3)    2003 (  51)
%%%                             1882 (   0)    1943 (   0)    2004 (  43)
%%%                             1883 (   0)    1944 (   0)    2005 (  52)
%%%                             1884 (   0)    1945 (   3)    2006 (  40)
%%%                             1885 (   0)    1946 (   6)    2007 (  45)
%%%                             1886 (   0)    1947 (   2)    2008 (  43)
%%%                             1887 (   0)    1948 (   4)    2009 (  32)
%%%                             1888 (   0)    1949 (   3)    2010 (  34)
%%%                             1889 (   0)    1950 (   3)    2011 (  35)
%%%                             1890 (   0)    1951 (   1)    2012 (  21)
%%%                             1891 (   0)    1952 (   7)    2013 (  13)
%%%                             1892 (   0)    1953 (   1)    2014 (  26)
%%%                             1893 (   0)    1954 (   1)    2015 (  15)
%%%                             1894 (   0)    1955 (   2)    2016 (  16)
%%%                             1895 (   0)    1956 (   2)    2017 (  11)
%%%                             1896 (   0)    1957 (   1)    2018 (  16)
%%%                             1897 (   0)    1958 (   5)    2019 (   4)
%%%                             19xx (   1)
%%%
%%%                             Article:        108
%%%                             Book:          1697
%%%                             InCollection:    11
%%%                             InProceedings:   10
%%%                             Manual:          29
%%%                             Misc:            19
%%%                             Periodical:       1
%%%                             PhdThesis:        4
%%%                             Proceedings:     19
%%%                             TechReport:      47
%%%                             Unpublished:      1
%%%
%%%                             Total entries: 1946
%%%
%%%                        In the original label scheme, citation tags
%%%                        were chosen as "FirstAuthor:key-phrase", with
%%%                        the FirstAuthor capitalized (all caps if an
%%%                        acronym), and the key-phrase a (possibly
%%%                        hyphenated) phrase in lower case taken from
%%%                        the title.  Normally, the key-phrase should
%%%                        be constructed from the initial letters of
%%%                        the first three capitalized names in the
%%%                        title, ignoring articles and prepositions,
%%%                        followed by the last two digits of the year
%%%                        of publication. That system was later
%%%                        replaced by one in which the year is given as
%%%                        a four-digit value between colons separating
%%%                        the author and key-phrase, as in
%%%                        Abrahams:1997:UIC.
%%%
%%%                        At version 4.00 [13-Feb-2019], citation
%%%                        labels of all but about 50 entries (mostly
%%%                        corporate authored) were converted to the new
%%%                        scheme.  In preparation for version 4.00,
%%%                        tableofcontents, and sometimes,
%%%                        shorttableofcontents, values have been added
%%%                        to most book-like entries: about 80 percent
%%%                        of them now have such data.  In many cases,
%%%                        where such data were found in library
%%%                        catalogs, chapter and page numbers, and
%%%                        sectional titles, are absent.  In numerous
%%%                        cases, the availability of contents
%%%                        information has identified publications that
%%%                        have subsequently been recorded in other
%%%                        author- and subject-specific bibliographies.
%%%
%%%                        Internet addresses and filenames should be
%%%                        entered with the \path macro, for example,
%%%                        \path|rms at prep.ai.mit.edu|.
%%%
%%%                        Oren Patashnik recommends against using
%%%                        ties (~) ANYWHERE in the bibliography;
%%%                        BibTeX puts them in where needed.
%%%
%%%                        Journals should always be named using a
%%%                        string definition of the form j-XYZ.
%%%
%%%                        Publishers should similarly be named with a
%%%                        string definition of the form pub-XYZ, and
%%%                        their addresses in the form pub-XYZ:adr.
%%%
%%%                        Built-in BibTeX journal names should be
%%%                        avoided.
%%%
%%%                        The checksum field above contains a CRC-16
%%%                        checksum as the first value, followed by the
%%%                        equivalent of the standard UNIX wc (word
%%%                        count) utility output of lines, words, and
%%%                        characters.  This is produced by Robert
%%%                        Solovay's checksum utility."
%%%     }
%%% ====================================================================
%%% The handy \path macro provided by path.sty allows |prep.ai.mit.edu|
%%% to (1) be set in typewriter text, and (2) get automatically
%%% inserted \penalty0 to make linebreaks at punctuation.  It can be
%%% used for e-mail addresses and UNIX filenames, and otherwise, works
%%% just like the LaTeX \verb macro.
%%%
%%% TeX normally will not hyphenate words connected by a dash, and will
%%% normally allow a line break only after such a dash, not before.
%%% However, style guides show examples of the em dash starting a line,
%%% so a break before is probably okay.
@Preamble{"\input bibnames.sty "
 # "\input path.sty "
 # "\hyphenation{
                Kath-ryn
                Ker-n-i-ghan
                Krom-mes
                Lar-ra-bee
                Mi-cro-com-puters
                Mi-cro-pro-ces-sors
                Mo-tif
                Pat-rick
                Port-able
                Post-Script
                Pren-tice
                Prin-ci-ples
                Pro-gram-ming
                Rich-ard
                Richt-er
                Ro-bert
                Semi-nu-mer-i-cal
                Sha-mos
                Spring-er
                The-o-dore
                Uz-ga-lis
                }" #
    "\ifx \undefined \bioname   \def \bioname#1{{{\em #1\/}}} \fi" #
    "\ifx \undefined \booktitle \def \booktitle#1{{{\em #1}}} \fi" #
    "\ifx \undefined \eth       \def \eth{d} \fi"
}

%%% ====================================================================
%%% Acknowledgement abbreviations:
@String{ack-bkph = "Berthold K. P. Horn,
                    e-mail: \path|bkph@ai.mit.edu|"}

@String{ack-bnb =   "Barbara N. Beeton
                    e-mail: \path|bnb@math.ams.org|"}

@String{ack-fm  =   "Frank Mittelbach,
                    e-mail: \path|mittelbach@mzdmza.zdv.uni-mainz.de|"}

@String{ack-jpl =   "Jeff Lankford,
                    e-mail: \path|jpl@nrtc.northrop.com|"}

@String{ack-mz = "Mona Zeftel,
                  Addison-Wesley Publishing Company,
                  Reading, MA, USA,
                  e-mail: \path|crw@wjh12.harvard.edu|"}

@String{ack-nhfb = "Nelson H. F. Beebe,
                    University of Utah,
                    Department of Mathematics, 110 LCB,
                    155 S 1400 E RM 233,
                    Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0090, USA,
                    Tel: +1 801 581 5254,
                    FAX: +1 801 581 4148,
                    e-mail: \path|beebe@math.utah.edu|,
                            \path|beebe@acm.org|,
                            \path|beebe@computer.org| (Internet),
                    URL: \path|http://www.math.utah.edu/~beebe/|"}

@String{ack-nj =  "Norbert Juffa,
                  2445 Mission College Blvd.
                  Santa Clara, CA 95054
                  USA
                  email: \path=norbert@iit.com="}

@String{ack-njh =   "Nick Higham,
                    e-mail: \path|higham@vtx.ma.man.ac.uk|"}

%%% ====================================================================
%%% Institution abbreviations:
@String{inst-INST-ADV-STUDY     = "Institute for Advanced Study"}
@String{inst-INST-ADV-STUDY:adr = "Princeton, NJ, USA"}

%%% ====================================================================
%%% Journal abbreviations:
@String{j-ANN-MATH              = "Annals of Mathematics"}

@String{j-BELL-LABS-RECORD      = "Bell Laboratories Record"}

@String{j-BELL-SYST-TECH-J      = "The Bell System Technical Journal"}

@String{j-CACM                  = "Communications of the Association
                                  for Computing Machinery"}

@String{j-CBM                   = "Computers in Biology and Medicine"}

@String{j-CGIP                  = "Computer Graphics and Image Processing"}

@String{j-CJ                    = "The Computer Journal"}

@String{j-COMP-LANG-MAG         = "Computer Language Magazine"}

@String{j-COMP-SURV             = "ACM Computing Surveys"}

@String{j-COMPCON-SPRING89      = "Digest of Papers of {COMPCON} Spring '89"}

@String{j-COMPUTER              = "Computer"}

@String{j-CS                    = "Computing Surveys"}

@String{j-DDJ                   = "Dr. Dobb's Journal"}

@String{j-GUTENBERG             = "Cahiers GUTenberg"}

@String{j-IBM-JRD               = "IBM J. Res. Develop."}

@String{j-IEEE-MICRO            = "IEEE Micro"}

@String{j-IEEE-SPECTRUM         = "IEEE Spectrum"}

@String{j-IJSAHPC               = "International Journal of
                                  Supercomputer Applications and High
                                  Performance Computing"}

@String{j-J-INST-ACTUARIES      = "Journal of the Institute of Actuaries"}

@String{j-J-MATH-PHYS-MIT       = "Journal of mathematics and physics /
                                  Massachusetts Institute of Technology"}

@String{j-MATH-COMPUT           = "Mathematics of Computation"}

@String{j-MATH-INTEL            = "The Mathematical Intelligencer"}

@String{j-MATH-TABLES-OTHER-AIDS-COMPUT = "Mathematical Tables and Other Aids
                                  to Computation"}

@String{j-MICROPROC-REP         = "Microprocessor report"}

@String{j-MONTHLY-NOT-ROY-ASTRON-SOC = "Monthly Notices of the Royal
                                  Astronomical Society"}

@String{j-NAMS                  = "Notices of the American Mathematical
                                  Society"}

@String{j-NATURE                = "Nature"}

@String{j-NEW-SCIENTIST         = "New Scientist"}

@String{j-PROC-NATL-ACAD-SCI-USA = "Proceedings of the National Academy of
                                  Sciences of the United States of America"}

@String{j-PROC-SID              = "Proceedings of the Society for
                                  Information Display"}

@String{j-REV-GEN-SCI-PURES-APPL = "Revue G{\'e}n{\'e}rale des Sciences Pures
                                  et Appliqu{\'e}es"}

@String{j-SA                    = "Scientific American"}

@String{j-SCI-MONTHLY           = "The Scientific Monthly"}

@String{j-SCI-PROC-ROY-DUBLIN-SOC = "Scientific proceedings of the Royal Dublin
                                  Society"}

@String{j-SIAM-J-COMPUT         = "SIAM Journal on Computing"}

@String{j-SIGGRAPH              = "ACM SIG{\-}GRAPH\emdash
                                  Com{\-}puter Graphics"}

@String{j-SIGPLAN               = "ACM SIG{\-}PLAN Notices"}

@String{j-SPE                   = "Soft{\-}ware\emdash Prac{\-}tice
                                  and Experience"}

@String{j-SR                    = "Supercomputing Review"}

@String{j-SUNEXPERT             = "SunExpert"}

@String{j-TEXHAX                = "{\TeX{}{\-}hax}"}

@String{j-TEXNIQUES             = "{\TeX}niques"}

@String{j-TOG                   = "ACM Transactions on Graphics"}

@String{j-USENIX-SCP            = "{USENIX} Summer Conference Proceedings"}

%%% ====================================================================
%%% Publishers and their addresses:
@String{pub-A-K-PETERS          = "A. K. Peters, Ltd."}
@String{pub-A-K-PETERS:adr      = "Wellesley, MA, USA"}

@String{pub-ACADEMIC            = "Academic Press"}
@String{pub-ACADEMIC:adr        = "New York, NY, USA"}

@String{pub-ACM                 = "ACM Press"}
@String{pub-ACM:adr             = "New York, NY 10036, USA"}

@String{pub-ACS                 = "American Chemical Society"}
@String{pub-ACS:adr             = "Washington, DC, USA"}

@String{pub-ADAM-HILGER         = "Adam Hilger Ltd."}
@String{pub-ADAM-HILGER:adr     = "Bristol, UK"}

@String{pub-ADOBE               = "{Adobe Systems Incorporated}"}

@String{pub-ADOBE-PRESS         = "Adobe Press"}
@String{pub-ADOBE-PRESS:adr     = "Mountain View, CA, USA"}
@String{pub-ADOBE:adr           = "1585 Charleston Road, P.~O. Box
                                  7900, Mountain View, CA 94039-7900,
                                  USA, Tel: (415) 961-4400"}

@String{pub-AFIPS               = "AFIPS Press"}
@String{pub-AFIPS:adr           = "Montvale, NJ, USA"}

@String{pub-AIP                 = "American Institute of Physics"}
@String{pub-AIP:adr             = "Woodbury, NY, USA"}

@String{pub-ALLYN-BACON         = "Allyn and Bacon"}
@String{pub-ALLYN-BACON:adr     = "Boston, MA, USA"}

@String{pub-AMS                 = "American Mathematical Society"}
@String{pub-AMS:adr             = "Providence, RI, USA"}

@String{pub-ANCHOR-BOOKS        = "Anchor Books"}
@String{pub-ANCHOR-BOOKS:adr    = "New York, NY, USA"}

@String{pub-ANL                 = "Argonne National Laboratory"}
@String{pub-ANL:adr             = "Argonne, IL, USA"}

@String{pub-ANSI                = "American National Standards Institute"}
@String{pub-ANSI:adr            = "1430 Broadway, New York, NY 10018, USA"}

@String{pub-AP-PROFESSIONAL     = "AP Professional"}
@String{pub-AP-PROFESSIONAL:adr = "Boston, MA, USA"}

@String{pub-APRESS              = "Apress"}
@String{pub-APRESS:adr          = "Berkeley, CA, USA"}

@String{pub-ATT-BELL            = "AT\&T Bell Laboratories"}
@String{pub-ATT-BELL:adr        = "Murray Hill, NJ 07974, USA"}

@String{pub-AW                  = "Ad{\-d}i{\-s}on-Wes{\-l}ey"}
@String{pub-AW:adr              = "Reading, MA, USA"}

@String{pub-AW-LONGMAN          = "Ad{\-d}i{\-s}on-Wes{\-l}ey Longman"}
@String{pub-AW-LONGMAN:adr      = "Harlow, Essex CM20 2JE, England"}

@String{pub-AWE                 = "Ad{\-}di{\-}son-Wes{\-}ley Europe"}
@String{pub-AWE:adr             = "Amsterdam, The Netherlands"}

@String{pub-AWV                 = "Ad{\-}di{\-}son-Wes{\-}ley Verlag"}
@String{pub-AWV:adr             = "Bonn, Germany"}

@String{pub-BANTAM              = "Bantam Books"}
@String{pub-BANTAM:adr          = "New York, NY, USA"}

@String{pub-BARNES-NOBLE        = "Barnes and Noble"}
@String{pub-BARNES-NOBLE:adr    = "New York, NY, USA"}

@String{pub-BASIC-BOOKS         = "Basic Books"}
@String{pub-BASIC-BOOKS:adr     = "New York, NY, USA"}

@String{pub-BELKNAP             = "Belknap Press of Harvard University Press"}
@String{pub-BELKNAP:adr         = "Cambridge, MA and London, UK"}

@String{pub-BENCUM              = "Benjamin/Cummings Pub. Co."}
@String{pub-BENCUM:adr          = "Redwood City, CA, USA"}

@String{pub-BENJAMIN            = "W. A. {Benjamin, Inc.}"}
@String{pub-BENJAMIN:adr        = "New York, NY, USA"}

@String{pub-BERKLEY-BOOKS       = "Berkley Books"}
@String{pub-BERKLEY-BOOKS:adr   = "New York, NY, USA"}

@String{pub-BIRKHAUSER          = "Birkh{\"{a}}user"}
@String{pub-BIRKHAUSER:adr      = "Cambridge, MA, USA; Berlin, Germany; Basel,
                                  Switzerland"}

@String{pub-BIRKHAUSER-BOSTON   = "Birkh{\"a}user Boston Inc."}
@String{pub-BIRKHAUSER-BOSTON:adr = "Cambridge, MA, USA"}

@String{pub-BOWKER              = "R. R. Bowker Company"}
@String{pub-BOWKER:adr          = "1180 Avenue of the Americas, New
                                  York, NY 10036, USA"}

@String{pub-BRADY               = "Robert J. Brady Co."}
@String{pub-BRADY:adr           = "Bowie, MD 20715, USA"}

@String{pub-BROOKS-COLE         = "Brooks\slash Cole"}
@String{pub-BROOKS-COLE:adr     = "Pacific Grove, CA, USA"}

@String{pub-CAMBRIDGE           = "Cambridge University Press"}
@String{pub-CAMBRIDGE:adr       = "Cambridge, UK"}

@String{pub-CBI                 = "Contemporary Books, Inc."}
@String{pub-CBI:adr             = "180 North Michigan Avenue, Chicago,
                                  IL 60601, USA"}

@String{pub-CBM                 = "CBM Books"}
@String{pub-CBM:adr             = "A Division of Cardinal Business
                                  Media Inc., 101 Witmer Road,
                                  Horsham, PA 19044, USA"}

@String{pub-CHAPMAN-HALL        = "Chapman and Hall, Ltd."}
@String{pub-CHAPMAN-HALL:adr    = "London, UK"}

@String{pub-CHARTWELL           = "Chartwell Books, Inc."}
@String{pub-CHARTWELL:adr       = "110 Enterprise Avenue, Secaucus, NJ
                                  07094, USA"}

@String{pub-CIAOCO              = "{\'E}ditions Ciaoco"}
@String{pub-CIAOCO:adr          = "Artel, Bruxelles, Belgium"}

@String{pub-CIPS                = "Canadian Information Processing Society"}
@String{pub-CIPS:adr            = "243 College St, 5th Floor, Toronto,
                                  Ontario M5T~2Y1, Canada"}

@String{pub-CLARENDON           = "Clarendon Press"}
@String{pub-CLARENDON:adr       = "Oxford, UK"}

@String{pub-CLSC                = "College of Science Computer"}
@String{pub-CLSC:adr            = "Department of Physics, University
                                  of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112,
                                  USA"}

@String{pub-COLLIER             = "Collier Books, Macmillan Publishing
                                  Company"}
@String{pub-COLLIER:adr         = "New York, NY, USA"}

@String{pub-COLLIER-MACMILLAN   = "Collier Macmillan Canada"}
@String{pub-COLLIER-MACMILLAN:adr = "Toronto, Ontario, Canada"}

@String{pub-COLUMBIA            = "Columbia University Press"}
@String{pub-COLUMBIA:adr        = "New York, NY, USA"}

@String{pub-COPERNICUS          = "Copernicus (a division of Springer-Verlag
                                  New York, Inc.)"}
@String{pub-COPERNICUS:adr      = "175 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10010, USA"}

@String{pub-CORIOLIS            = "Coriolis Group Books"}
@String{pub-CORIOLIS:adr        = "Scottsdale, AZ, USA"}

@String{pub-CRC                 = "CRC Press"}
@String{pub-CRC:adr             = "2000 N.W. Corporate Blvd., Boca Raton,
                                  FL 33431-9868, USA"}

@String{pub-CROWN               = "Crown Publishers"}
@String{pub-CROWN:adr           = "New York, NY, USA"}

@String{pub-CSLI                = "CSLI Publications"}
@String{pub-CSLI:adr            = "Stanford, CA, USA"}

@String{pub-CSP                 = "Computer Science Press"}
@String{pub-CSP:adr             = "11 Taft Court, Rockville, MD 20850, USA"}

@String{pub-CWI                 = "Centrum voor Wiskunde en Informatica"}
@String{pub-CWI:adr             = "P. O. Box 4079, 1009 AB Amsterdam,
                                  The Netherlands"}

@String{pub-DOUBLEDAY           = "Doubleday"}
@String{pub-DOUBLEDAY:adr       = "New York, NY, USA"}

@String{pub-DOVER               = "Dover"}
@String{pub-DOVER:adr           = "New York, NY, USA"}

@String{pub-DP                  = "Digital Press"}
@String{pub-DP:adr              = "12 Crosby Drive, Bedford, MA 01730, USA"}

@String{pub-DPUNKT-VERLAG       = "dpunkt-Verlag"}
@String{pub-DPUNKT-VERLAG:adr   = "Heidelberg, Germany"}

@String{pub-DUNOD               = "Dunod"}
@String{pub-DUNOD:adr           = "Paris, France"}

@String{pub-ELLIS-HORWOOD       = "Ellis Horwood"}
@String{pub-ELLIS-HORWOOD:adr   = "New York, NY, USA"}

@String{pub-ELSEVIER            = "Elsevier"}
@String{pub-ELSEVIER:adr        = "Amsterdam, The Netherlands"}

@String{pub-ELSEVIER-ACADEMIC   = "Elsevier Academic Press"}
@String{pub-ELSEVIER-ACADEMIC:adr = "Amsterdam, The Netherlands"}

@String{pub-ELSEVIER-MORGAN-KAUFMANN = "Elsevier\slash Morgan Kaufmann"}
@String{pub-ELSEVIER-MORGAN-KAUFMANN:adr = "San Francisco, CA, USA"}

@String{pub-FABER-FABER         = "Faber and Faber"}
@String{pub-FABER-FABER:adr     = "London, UK"}

@String{pub-FARRAR              = "Farrar, Strauss, and Giroux"}
@String{pub-FARRAR:adr          = "New York, NY, USA"}

@String{pub-FAWCETT             = "Fawcett Columbine"}
@String{pub-FAWCETT:adr         = "New York, NY, USA"}

@String{pub-FSF                 = "{Free Software Foundation, Inc.}"}
@String{pub-FSF:adr             = "51 Franklin Street, Fifth Floor, Boston,
                                  MA 02110-1301, USA, Tel: (617) 876-3296"}

@String{pub-GODINE              = "David R. Godine, Publisher"}
@String{pub-GODINE:adr          = "Boston, MA, USA"}

@String{pub-GRAPHICS-PRESS      = "Graphics Press"}
@String{pub-GRAPHICS-PRESS:adr  = "Box 430, Cheshire, CT 06410, USA"}

@String{pub-GRAPHICCOMM         = "Graphic Communications Association"}
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@String{pub-HARPER-ROW          = "Harper \& Row"}
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@String{pub-SV                  = "Spring{\-}er-Ver{\-}lag"}
@String{pub-SV:adr              = "Berlin, Germany~/ Heidelberg,
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@String{pub-TAYLOR-FRANCIS      = "Taylor and Francis"}
@String{pub-TAYLOR-FRANCIS:adr  = "London, UK and Boca Raton, FL, USA"}

@String{pub-TELOS               = "TELOS division of Springer-Verlag"}
@String{pub-TELOS:adr           = "Santa Clara, CA, USA and New York, NY, USA"}

@String{pub-TEXPLORATORS        = "The {\TeX}plorators Corporation"}
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@String{pub-TICKNOR-FIELDS      = "Ticknor and Fields"}
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@String{pub-THREE-RIVERS        = "Three Rivers Press"}
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@String{pub-TRANSACTION         = "Transaction Publishers, Rutgers University"}
@String{pub-TRANSACTION:adr     = "New Brunswick, NJ 08903, USA"}

@String{pub-TRILITHON           = "Trilithon Press"}
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@String{pub-U-CALIFORNIA-PRESS  = "University of California Press"}
@String{pub-U-CALIFORNIA-PRESS:adr = "Berkeley, CA, USA"}

@String{pub-U-CHICAGO           = "University of Chicago Press"}
@String{pub-U-CHICAGO:adr       = "Chicago, IL, USA and London, UK"}

@String{pub-U-TEXAS-PRESS       = "University of Texas Press"}
@String{pub-U-TEXAS-PRESS:adr   = "Austin, TX, USA"}

@String{pub-UNIC                = "UNI{$\bullet$}C"}
@String{pub-UNIC:adr            = "Danmarks EDB-Center for Forskning
                                  og Uddannelse, Copenhagen, Denmark"}

@String{pub-URW                 = "URW-Verlag"}
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@String{pub-USENIX              = "USENIX"}
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@String{pub-USGPO               = "United States Government Printing Office"}
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@String{pub-USNPS               = "U. S. Naval Postgraduate School"}
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@String{pub-USNWL               = "U. S. Naval Weapons Laboratory"}
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@String{pub-VIKING              = "Viking"}
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@String{pub-VINTAGE             = "Vintage Books"}
@String{pub-VINTAGE:adr         = "New York, NY, USA"}

@String{pub-VAN-NOSTRAND-REINHOLD = "Van Nostrand Reinhold"}
@String{pub-VAN-NOSTRAND-REINHOLD:adr = "New York, NY, USA"}

@String{pub-W-H-FREEMAN         = "W. H. {Freeman and Company}"}
@String{pub-W-H-FREEMAN:adr     = "New York, NY, USA"}

@String{pub-W-R-CHAMBERS        = "W. and R. Chambers Ltd."}
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@String{pub-WADSWORTH           = "Wadsworth"}
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@String{pub-WALKER              = "Walker and Company"}
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@String{pub-WATSON-GUPTILL:adr  = "1515 Broadway, New York, NY 10036, USA"}

@String{pub-WEITEK              = "Weitek Corporation"}
@String{pub-WEITEK:adr          = "1060 E. Arques Ave., Sunnyvale, CA
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@String{pub-WILEY               = "Wiley"}
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@String{pub-WILEY-INTERSCIENCE  = "Wiley-In{\-}ter{\-}sci{\-}ence"}
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@String{pub-WINDCREST           = "Windcrest\slash McGraw-Hill"}
@String{pub-WINDCREST:adr       = "Blue Ridge Summit, PA, USA"}

@String{pub-WORLD-SCI           = "World Scientific Publishing
                                  Co. Pte. Ltd."}
@String{pub-WORLD-SCI:adr       = "P. O. Box 128, Farrer Road,
                                  Singapore 9128"}

@String{pub-X-OPEN              = "X/Open Company, Ltd."}
@String{pub-X-OPEN:adr          = "Reading, UK"}

@String{pub-YALE                = "Yale University Press"}
@String{pub-YALE:adr            = "New Haven, CT, USA"}

@String{pub-YOURDON             = "Yourdon Press"}
@String{pub-YOURDON:adr         = "Englewood Cliffs, NJ 07632, USA"}

%%% ====================================================================
%%% Series abbreviations:
@String{ser-LNCS                = "Lecture Notes in Computer Science"}

@String{ser-LNM                 = "Lecture Notes in Mathematics"}

%%% ====================================================================
%%% Bibliography entries, sorted by citation key.
@Book{Aaserud:2013:LLQ,
  author =       "Finn Aaserud and J. L. Heilbron",
  title =        "Love, Literature, and the Quantum Atom: {Niels Bohr}'s
                 1913 Trilogy Revisited",
  publisher =    pub-OXFORD,
  address =      pub-OXFORD:adr,
  pages =        "viii + 284",
  year =         "2013",
  ISBN =         "0-19-968028-0 (hardcover)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-19-968028-3 (hardcover)",
  LCCN =         "QC774.B64 A19 2013",
  bibdate =      "Fri Oct 31 06:04:25 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/bibnet/authors/b/bohr-niels.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/bibnet/authors/r/rutherford-ernest.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/isis2010.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 z3950.loc.gov:7090/Voyager",
  abstract =     "This title presents unpublished excerpts from
                 extensive correspondence between Niels Bohr and his
                 immediate family, and uses it to describe and analyze
                 the psychological and cultural background to his
                 invention of the quantum theory of the atom.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  subject =      "Bohr, Niels; Correspondence; Family; Nuclear
                 physicists; Denmark",
  subject-dates = "Niels Bohr (1885--1962)",
  tableofcontents = "Part 1 Niels Bohr's Private Sphere \\
                 Revealed through unpublished family correspondence /
                 Finn Aaserud \\
                 1.1. Introduction \\
                 1.2. Finding each other in Copenhagen \\
                 1.3. Niels in Cambridge \\
                 1.4. Niels in Manchester \\
                 1.5. Beginning married life in Copenhagen \\
                 1.6. Conclusion \\
                 Part 2 Nascent Science \\
                 The scientific and psychological background to Bohr's
                 Trilogy / J. L. Heilbron \\
                 2.1. Necessary preliminaries \\
                 2.2. Some physics around 1900 \\
                 2.3.``Stupid electrons'' \\
                 2.4. Indictment of ``classical physics'' \\
                 2.5. Odin the law giver \\
                 2.6. The Trilogy \\
                 2.7. Bolts from the blue \\
                 Works cited \\
                 Part 3 The Trilogy \\
                 On the Constitution of Atoms and Molecules / Niels Bohr
                 \\
                 3.1. Binding of Electrons by Positive Nuclei \\
                 3.2. Systems Containing only a Single Nucleus \\
                 3.3. Systems Containing Several Nuclei",
}

@Article{Abe:index,
  author =       "Kris K. Abe and Daniel M. Berry",
  title =        "{\tt indx} and {\tt findphrases}, {A} System for
                 Generating Indexes for Ditroff Documents",
  journal =      j-SPE,
  volume =       "19",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "1--34",
  month =        jan,
  year =         "1989",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Abrahams:1990:TI,
  author =       "Paul W. Abrahams and Karl Berry and Kathryn A.
                 Hargreaves",
  key =          "ABH90",
  title =        "{\TeX} for the Impatient",
  publisher =    pub-AW,
  address =      pub-AW:adr,
  pages =        "xvii + 357",
  year =         "1990",
  ISBN =         "0-201-51375-7",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-201-51375-2",
  LCCN =         "Z253.4.T47 A27 1990",
  bibdate =      "Tue Dec 14 22:55:21 1993",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/texbook3.bib",
  abstract =     "\TeX{}, a software system created by Donald E. Knuth,
                 sets the standard for typesetting in mathematics,
                 science, and engineering. Features: complete
                 description of \TeX{} commands, arranged for lookup
                 either by function or alphabetically; clear definitions
                 of essential \TeX{} concepts, collected in separate
                 chapter so that the command descriptions remain brief
                 and accessible; explanations of common error messages
                 and advice on solving problems that frequently arise; a
                 collection of useful macros (also available in
                 electronic form).",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  shorttableofcontents = "1 Using this book / 1 \\
                 2 Using \TeX{} / 7 \\
                 3 Examples / 21 \\
                 4 Concepts / 43 \\
                 5 Commands for composing paragraphs / 97 \\
                 6 Commands for composing Pages / 133 \\
                 7 Commands for horizontal and vertical modes / 153 \\
                 8 Commands for composing math formulas / 187 \\
                 9 Commands for general operations / 221 \\
                 10 Tips and techniques / 265 \\
                 11 Making sense of error messages / 283 \\
                 12 A compendium of useful macros / 291 \\
                 13 Capsule summary of commands / 313 \\
                 Index / 341",
  tableofcontents = "1: Using this book / 1 \\
                 Syntactic conventions / 2 \\
                 Descriptions of the commands / 3 \\
                 2: Using \TeX{} / 7 \\
                 Turning input into ink / 7 \\
                 Programs and files you need / 7 \\
                 Running \TeX{} / 9 \\
                 Preparing an input file / 10 \\
                 Commands and control sequences / 10 \\
                 Arguments / 11 \\
                 Parameters / 12 \\
                 Spaces / 12 \\
                 Comments / 13 \\
                 Punctuation / 13 \\
                 Special characters / 15 \\
                 Groups / 15 \\
                 Math formulas / 16 \\
                 How \TeX{} works / 16 \\
                 New \TeX{} versus old \TeX{} / 18 \\
                 Resources / 18 \\
                 3: Examples / 21 \\
                 Entering simple text / 22 \\
                 Indentation / 24 \\
                 Fonts and special characters / 26 \\
                 Interline spacing / 28 \\
                 Spacing, rules, and boxes / 30 \\
                 Odds and ends / o32 \\
                 Using fonts from other sources / 34 \\
                 A ruled table / 36 \\
                 Typesetting mathematics / 38 \\
                 More mathematics / 40 \\
                 4: Concepts / 43 \\
                 5: Commands for composing paragraphs / 97 \\
                 Characters and accents / 97 \\
                 Letters and ligatures for European alphabets / 97 \\
                 Special symbols / 98 \\
                 Arbitrary characters / 99 \\
                 Accents / 100 \\
                 Defeating boundary ligatures / 101 \\
                 Selecting fonts / 1o2 \\
                 Particular fonts / 102 \\
                 Type styles / 103 \\
                 Uppercase and lowercase / 103 \\
                 Interword spacing / 104 \\
                 Centering and justifying lines / 108 \\
                 Shaping paragraphs / 110 \\
                 Starting, ending, and indenting paragraphs / 110 \\
                 Shaping entire paragraphs / 114 \\
                 Line breaks / 120 \\
                 Encouraging or discouraging line breaks / 120 \\
                 Line breaking parameters / 123 \\
                 Hyphenation / 126 \\
                 Section headings, lists, and theorems / 129 \\
                 6: Commands for composing pages / 133 \\
                 Interline and interparagraph spaces r / 133 \\
                 Pagebreaks / 136 \\
                 Encouraging or discouraging page breaks / 136 \\
                 Page breaking parameters / 138 \\
                 Page layout / 140 \\
                 Page description parameters / 140 \\
                 Page numbers / 142 \\
                 Header and footer lines / 143 \\
                 Marks / 144 \\
                 Insertions / 145 \\
                 Footnotes / 145 \\
                 General insertions / 146 \\
                 Modifying the output routine / 148 \\
                 Splitting vertical lists / 149 \\
                 7: Commands for horizontal and vertical modes / 153 \\
                 Producing space / 153 \\
                 Fixed-width horizontal space / 153 \\
                 Fixed-length vertical space / 154 \\
                 Variable-size space / 155 \\
                 Manipulating boxes / 160 \\
                 Constructing hboxes and vboxes / 160 \\
                 Setting and retrieving the contents of boxes / 164 \\
                 Shifting boxes / 166 \\
                 Dimensions of box registers / 167 \\
                 Struts, phantoms, and empty boxes / 167 \\
                 Parameters pertaining to malformed boxes / 170 \\
                 Retrieving the last item from a list / 171 \\
                 Rules and leaders / 172 \\
                 Alignments / 176 \\
                 Tabbing alignments / 176 \\
                 General alignments / 178 \\
                 8: Commands for composing math formulas / 187 \\
                 Simple parts of formulas / 187 \\
                 Creek letters / 187 \\
                 Miscellaneous ordinary math symbols / 188 \\
                 Binary operations / 189 \\
                 Relations / 190 \\
                 Left and right delimiters / 191 \\
                 Arrows / 192 \\
                 Named mathematical functions / 193 \\
                 Large operators / 194 \\
                 Punctuation / 196 \\
                 Superscripts and subscripts / 197 \\
                 Selecting and using styles / 198 \\
                 Compound symbols / 199 \\
                 Math accents / 199 \\
                 Fractions and other stacking operations / 200 \\
                 Dots / 203 \\
                 Delimiters / 204 \\
                 Matrices / 205 \\
                 Roots and radicals / 206 \\
                 Equation numbers / 207 \\
                 Multiline displays / 208 \\
                 Fonts in math formula / 209 \\
                 Constructing math symbols / 211 \\
                 Making delimiters bigger / 211 \\
                 Parts of large symbols / 211 \\
                 Aligning parts of a formula / 212 \\
                 Aligning accents / 212 \\
                 Aligning material vertically / 213 \\
                 Producing spaces / 214 \\
                 Fixed-width math spaces / 214 \\
                 Variable-width math spaces / 215 \\
                 Spacing parameters for displays / 216 \\
                 Other spacing parameters for math / 217 \\
                 Categorizing math constructs / 218 \\
                 Special actions for math formulas / 218 \\
                 9: Commands for general operations / 221 \\
                 Naming and modifying fonts / 221 \\
                 Converting information to tokens / 224 \\
                 Numbers / 224 \\
                 Environmental information / 224 \\
                 Values of variables / 226 \\
                 Grouping / 227 \\
                 Macros / 230 \\
                 Defining macros / 230 \\
                 Other definitions / 232 \\
                 Controlling expansion / 233 \\
                 Conditional tests / 235 \\
                 Repeated actions / 240 \\
                 Doing nothing / 241 \\
                 Registers / 242 \\
                 Using registers / 242 \\
                 Naming and reserving registers, etc. / 244 \\
                 Doing arithmetic in registers / 245 \\
                 Ending the job / 246 \\
                 Input and output / 247 \\
                 Operations on input files / 247 \\
                 Operations on output files / 249 \\
                 Interpreting input characters / 251 \\
                 Controlling interaction with \TeX{} / 252 \\
                 Diagnostic aids / 253 \\
                 Displaying internal data / 253 \\
                 Specifying what is traced / 256 \\
                 Sending messages / 261 \\
                 Initializing \TeX{} / 263 \\
                 10: Tips and techniques / 265 \\
                 Correcting bad page breaks / 265 \\
                 Preserving the end of a page / 267 \\
                 Leaving space at the top of a page / 267 \\
                 Correcting bad line breaks / 268 \\
                 Correcting overfull or underfull boxes / 268 \\
                 Recovering lost interword spaces / 270 \\
                 Avoiding unwanted interword spaces / 270 \\
                 Avoiding excess space around a display / 271 \\
                 Avoiding excess space after a paragraph / 271 \\
                 Changing the paragraph shape / 272 \\
                 Putting paragraphs into a box / 272 \\
                 Drawing lines / 273 \\
                 Creating multiline headers or footers / 274 \\
                 Finding mismatched braces / 275 \\
                 Setting dimensions / 276 \\
                 Creating composite fonts / 276 \\
                 Reproducing text verbatim / 277 \\
                 Using outer macros / 279 \\
                 Changing category codes / 280 \\
                 Making macro files more readable / 281 \\
                 11: Making sense of error messages / 283 \\
                 12: A compendium of useful macros / 291 \\
                 Preliminaries / 291 \\
                 Displays / 295 \\
                 Time of day / 297 \\
                 Lists / 298 \\
                 Verbatim listing / 300 \\
                 Tables of contents / 301 \\
                 Cross-references / 302 \\
                 Environments / 304 \\
                 Justification / 306 \\
                 Tables / 307 \\
                 Footnotes / 309 \\
                 Double columns / 309 \\
                 Finishing up / 311 \\
                 13: Capsule summary of commands / 313 \\
                 Index / 341",
}

@Book{Abrahams:1992:UI,
  author =       "Paul W. Abrahams and Bruce R. Larson",
  title =        "{UNIX} for the Impatient",
  publisher =    pub-AW,
  address =      pub-AW:adr,
  pages =        "xxvii + 559",
  year =         "1992",
  ISBN =         "0-201-55703-7",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-201-55703-9",
  LCCN =         "QA76.76.O63 A27 1992",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/unix.bib",
  note =         "Excellent, and thorough, coverage of {UNIX}, with
                 chapters on the file system, utilities, shells,
                 editors, Emacs, data manipulation, mail, network
                 communications and resources, the X Window System, and
                 a comparison of {MS-DOS} and {UNIX}.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  tableofcontents = "Introduction \\
                 UNIX Background \\
                 The POSIX 2 Standard \\
                 How to Use This Book \\
                 Typographical Conventions \\
                 Syntactic Conventions \\
                 Getting Started \\
                 Concepts \\
                 The UNIX Manual \\
                 System Administration and the Superuser \\
                 Users and Groups \\
                 What the Shell Does \\
                 The UNIX Kernel \\
                 Processes \\
                 The UNIX File System \\
                 File Permissions \\
                 Conventions for Using Files \\
                 Standard Files and Redirection \\
                 Other Facilities for Interprocess Communication \\
                 UNIX Commands \\
                 Local Variables \\
                 Initialization Files \\
                 Terminal Descriptions \\
                 Locales, Code Sets, and Internationalization \\
                 Regular Expressions \\
                 Devices \\
                 Operations on Files \\
                 Operations on Directories \\
                 Listing Files with ls \\
                 Displaying and Concatenating Files with cat \\
                 Linking, Moving, and Copying Files with ln, mv, and cp
                 \\
                 Removing Files \\
                 Examining Files or Output with a Pager \\
                 Printing Files \\
                 Finding Files with find \\
                 Locating, Classifying, and Checking Files \\
                 Comparing Files \\
                 Controlling File Access and Ownership \\
                 Miscellaneous File Utilities \\
                 Data Compression and Encoding \\
                 Archiving Sets of Files \\
                 Examining Files with od \\
                 Copying and Converting Data with dd \\
                 Updating Files with patch \\
                 Creating Special Files \\
                 Data Manipulation Using Filters \\
                 Sorting Files with sort \\
                 Finding Patterns with grep \\
                 Simple Data Transformations \\
                 Extracting Parts of Files \\
                 Combining Files \\
                 Using sed to Edit from a Script \\
                 The awk Programming Language \\
                 Other Data Manipulation Languages \\
                 Utility Programs \\
                 Information Services \\
                 Reporting on the Status of Processes \\
                 Managing Processes \\
                 Commands Related to Logging In \\
                 Controlling Your Terminal \\
                 On-Line Communication with Other Users \\
                 Disk Usage Statistics \\
                 Writing and Reading Strings \\
                 Evaluating Expressions \\
                 Special Invocation of Commands \\
                 Querying Your UNIX Environment \\
                 Miscellaneous Services \\
                 Producing Locale Information and Defining a Locale \\
                 Document Processing \\
                 Version Control \\
                 The Korn and POSIX Shells \\
                 Overview of the Korn Shell \\
                 Interacting with the Shell \\
                 Editing an Input Line \\
                 Calling the Shell Directly \\
                 Shell Scripts \\
                 Syntax of Shell Input \\
                 Patterns \\
                 Simple Commands \\
                 Linking Commands with Operators \\
                 Redirection \\
                 Here-Documents \\
                 The test, true, and false Commands \\
                 Compound Commands \\
                 How Commands Are Executed \\
                 Parameters \\
                 Parameter Expansions \\
                 Quotation \\
                 Substitutions \\
                 Aliases \\
                 Commands for Job Control \\
                 The Command History and the fc Command \\
                 Intrinsic Commands and Predefined Aliases \\
                 Predefined Variables Used by the Shell \\
                 Execution Options \\
                 Initialization Files for the Shell \\
                 Parsing Command Lines with getopts \\
                 A Sample Shell Script \\
                 Other Shells \\
                 The C Shell csh \\
                 Bash, the ``Bourne-again Shell'' \\
                 Standard Editors",
}

@Book{Abrahams:1997:UIC,
  author =       "Paul W. Abrahams and Bruce R. Larson",
  title =        "{UNIX} for the Impatient: {CD-ROM} Version",
  publisher =    pub-AW,
  address =      pub-AW:adr,
  edition =      "Second",
  pages =        "xxxvi + 824 + CD-31",
  year =         "1997",
  ISBN =         "0-201-41979-3",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-201-41979-5",
  LCCN =         "QA76.76.O63 A27 1992",
  bibdate =      "Fri Dec 19 10:57:11 1997",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  price =        "US\$49.00",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Abramowitz:1964:HMF,
  editor =       "Milton Abramowitz and Irene A. Stegun",
  key =          "NBS",
  title =        "Handbook of Mathematical Functions with Formulas,
                 Graphs, and Mathematical Tables",
  volume =       "55",
  publisher =    "U. S. Department of Commerce",
  address =      "Washington, DC, USA",
  pages =        "xiv + 1046",
  year =         "1964",
  LCCN =         "QA47.A161 1972; QA 55 A16h 1972",
  bibdate =      "Thu Jan 27 07:58:12 2000",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/bibnet/subjects/acc-stab-num-alg.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/bibnet/subjects/han-wri-mat-sci-2ed.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/elefunt.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  note =         "Tenth printing, with corrections (December 1972). This
                 book is also available online at
                 \path=http://www.convertit.com/Go/ConvertIt/Reference/AMS55.ASP=
                 in bitmap image format.",
  series =       "Applied mathematics series",
  abstract =     "This book is a compendium of mathematical formulas,
                 tables, and graphs. It contains a table of analytical
                 integrals, differential equations, and numerical
                 series; and includes tables of trigonometric and
                 hyperbolic functions, tables for numerical integration,
                 rules for differentiation and integration, and
                 techniques for point interpolation and function
                 approximation. Additionally, it devotes a entire
                 section to mathematical and physical constants as
                 fractions and powers of Pi, e, and prime numbers; and
                 discusses statistics by presenting combinatorial
                 analysis and probability functions.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  tableofcontents = "Mathematical constants / David S. Liepman \\
                 Physical constants and conversion factors / A. G.
                 McNish \\
                 Elementary analytical methods / Milton Abramowitz \\
                 Elementary transcendental functions: logarithmic,
                 exponential, circular and hyperbolic functions / Ruth
                 Zucker \\
                 Exponential integral and related functions / Walter
                 Gautschi and William F. Cahill \\
                 Gamma function and related functions / Philip J. Davis
                 \\
                 Error function and Fresnel integrals / Walter Gautschi
                 \\
                 Legendre functions / Irene A. Stegun \\
                 Bessel functions of integer order / F. W. J. Olver \\
                 Bessell functions of fractional order / H. A.
                 Antosiewicz \\
                 Integrals of Bessel functions / Yudell L. Luke \\
                 Struve functions and related functions / Milton
                 Abramowitz \\
                 Confluent hypergeometric functions / Lucy Joan Slater
                 \\
                 Coulomb wave functions / Milton Abramowitz \\
                 Hypergeometric functions / Fritz Oberhettinger \\
                 Jacobian elliptic functions and theta functions;
                 Elliptic integrals / L. M. Milne-Thomson \\
                 Weierstrass elliptic and related functions / Thomas H.
                 Southard \\
                 Parabolic cylinder functions / J. C. P. Miller\ldots{}
                 Mathieu functions / Gertrude Blanch \\
                 Spheroidal wave functions / Arnold N. Lowan \\
                 Orthogonal polynomials / Urs W. Hochstrasser \\
                 Bernoulli and Euler polynomials, Riemann zeta function
                 / Emilie V. Haynesworth and Karl Goldberg \\
                 Combinatorial analysis / K. Goldberg, M. Newman and E.
                 Haynesworth \\
                 Numerical interpolation, differentiation and
                 integration / Philip J. Davis and Ivan Polonsky \\
                 Probability functions / Marvin Zelen and Norman C.
                 Severo \\
                 Miscellaneous functions / Irene A. Stegun \\
                 Scales of notation / S. Peavy and A. Schopf \\
                 Laplace transforms",
}

@Book{Abrams:2004:NFS,
  author =       "Brad Abrams and Anders Hejlsberg and Brian Grunkemeyer
                 and Joel Marcey and Kit George and Krzysztof Cwalina
                 and Jeffrey Richter",
  title =        "{.NET} {Framework Standard Library} Annotated
                 Reference. Volume 1: Base Class Library and Extended
                 Numerics Library",
  publisher =    pub-AW,
  address =      pub-AW:adr,
  pages =        "xxvi + 528",
  year =         "2004",
  ISBN =         "0-321-15489-4 (hardcover)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-321-15489-7 (hardcover)",
  LCCN =         "QA76.76.M52 A27 2004",
  bibdate =      "Wed Mar 15 08:56:55 MST 2006",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 z3950.loc.gov:7090/Voyager",
  note =         "Foreword by Joel Marcey.",
  series =       "Microsoft .NET development series",
  URL =          "http://www.aw-bc.com/catalog/academic/product/0,1144,0321154894,00.html;
                 http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0411/2003024327.html",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  subject =      "Microsoft .NET Framework",
  tableofcontents = "Contents\\
                 Foreword\\
                 Preface\\
                 I. Namespaces\\
                 1. System Overview \\
                 2. System.IO Overview\\
                 3. System.Collections Overview\\
                 4. System.Text Overview\\
                 5. System.Threading Overview\\
                 6. System.Security Overview\\
                 7. System.Globalization Overview\\
                 II. Type Descriptions\\
                 1. ApplicationException (System)\\
                 2. ArgumentException (System)\\
                 3. ArgumentNullException (System)\\
                 4. ArgumentOutOfRangeException (System)\\
                 5. ArithmeticException (System)\\
                 6. Array (System)\\
                 7. ArrayTypeMismatchException (System)\\
                 8. AsyncCallback (System)\\
                 9. Attribute (System)\\
                 10. AttributeTargets (System)\\
                 11. AttributeUsageAttribute (System)\\
                 12. Boolean (System)\\
                 13. Byte (System)\\
                 14. Char (System)\\
                 15. CharEnumerator (System)\\
                 16. CLSCompliantAttribute (System)\\
                 17. ArrayList (System.Collections)\\
                 18. Comparer (System.Collections)\\
                 19. DictionaryEntry (System.Collections)\\
                 20. Hashtable (System.Collections)\\
                 21. ICollection (System.Collections)\\
                 22. IComparer (System.Collections)\\
                 23. IDictionary (System.Collections)\\
                 24. IDictionaryEnumerator (System.Collections)\\
                 25. IEnumerable (System.Collections)\\
                 26. IEnumerator (System.Collections)\\
                 27. IHashCodeProvider (System.Collections)\\
                 28. IList (System.Collections)\\
                 29. Console (System)\\
                 30. Convert (System)\\
                 31. DateTime (System)\\
                 32. Decimal (System)\\
                 33. Delegate (System)\\
                 34. ConditionalAttribute (System.Diagnostics)\\
                 35. DivideByZeroException (System)\\
                 36. Double (System)\\
                 37. DuplicateWaitObjectException (System)\\
                 38. Enum (System)\\
                 39. Environment (System)\\
                 40. EventArgs (System)\\
                 41. EventHandler (System)\\
                 42. Exception (System)\\
                 43. ExecutionEngineException (System)\\
                 44. FlagsAttribute (System)\\
                 45. FormatException (System)\\
                 46. GC (System)\\
                 47. DateTimeFormatInfo (System.Globalization)\\
                 48. DateTimeStyles (System.Globalization)\\
                 49. NumberFormatInfo (System.Globalization)\\
                 50. NumberStyles (System.Globalization)\\
                 51. UnicodeCategory (System.Globalization)\\
                 52. IAsyncResult (System)\\
                 53. ICloneable (System)\\
                 54. IComparable (System)\\
                 55. IDisposable (System)\\
                 56. IFormatProvider (System)\\
                 57. IFormattable (System)\\
                 58. IndexOutOfRangeException (System)\\
                 59. Int16 (System)\\
                 60. Int32 (System)\\
                 61. Int64 (System)\\
                 62. InvalidCastException (System)\\
                 63. InvalidOperationException (System)\\
                 64. InvalidProgramException (System)\\
                 65. Directory (System.IO)\\
                 66. DirectoryNotFoundException (System.IO)\\
                 67. EndOfStreamException (System.IO)\\
                 68. File (System.IO)\\
                 69. FileAccess (System.IO)\\
                 70. FileLoadException (System.IO)\\
                 71. FileMode (System.IO)\\
                 72. FileNotFoundException (System.IO)\\
                 73. FileShare (System.IO)\\
                 74. FileStream (System.IO)\\
                 75. IOException (System.IO)\\
                 76. MemoryStream (System.IO)\\
                 77. Path (System.IO)\\
                 78. PathTooLongException (System.IO)\\
                 79. SeekOrigin (System.IO)\\
                 80. Stream (System.IO)\\
                 81. StreamReader (System.IO)\\
                 82. StreamWriter (System.IO)\\
                 83. StringReader (System.IO)\\
                 84. StringWriter (System.IO)\\
                 85. TextReader (System.IO)\\
                 86. TextWriter (System.IO)\\
                 87. MarshalByRefObject (System)\\
                 88. Math (System)\\
                 89. NotFiniteNumberException (System)\\
                 90. NotSupportedException (System)\\
                 91. NullReferenceException (System)\\
                 92. Object (System)\\
                 93. ObjectDisposedException (System)\\
                 94. ObsoleteAttribute (System)\\
                 95. OutOfMemoryException (System)\\
                 96. OverflowException (System)\\
                 97. Random (System)\\
                 98. RankException (System)\\
                 99. SByte (System)\\
                 100. CodeAccessPermission (System.Security)\\
                 101. IPermission (System.Security)\\
                 102. CodeAccessSecurityAttribute
                 (System.Security.Permissions)\\
                 103. EnvironmentPermission
                 (System.Security.Permissions)\\
                 104. EnvironmentPermissionAccess
                 (System.Security.Permissions)\\
                 105. EnvironmentPermissionAttribute
                 (System.Security.Permissions)\\
                 106. FileIOPermission (System.Security.Permissions)\\
                 107. FileIOPermissionAccess
                 (System.Security.Permissions)\\
                 108. FileIOPermissionAttribute
                 (System.Security.Permissions)\\
                 109. PermissionState (System.Security.Permissions)\\
                 110. SecurityAction (System.Security.Permissions)\\
                 111. SecurityAttribute (System.Security.Permissions)\\
                 112. SecurityPermission
                 (System.Security.Permissions)\\
                 113. SecurityPermissionAttribute
                 (System.Security.Permissions)\\
                 114. SecurityPermissionFlag
                 (System.Security.Permissions)\\
                 115. PermissionSet (System.Security)\\
                 116. SecurityElement (System.Security)\\
                 117. SecurityException (System.Security)\\
                 118. VerificationException (System.Security)\\
                 119. Single (System)\\
                 120. StackOverflowException (System)\\
                 121. String (System)\\
                 122. SystemException (System)\\
                 123. ASCIIEncoding (System.Text)\\
                 124. Decoder (System.Text)\\
                 125. Encoder (System.Text)\\
                 126. Encoding (System.Text)\\
                 127. StringBuilder (System.Text)\\
                 128. UnicodeEncoding (System.Text)\\
                 129. UTF8Encoding (System.Text)\\
                 130. Interlocked (System.Threading)\\
                 131. Monitor (System.Threading)\\
                 132. SynchronizationLockException (System.Threading)\\
                 133. Thread (System.Threading)\\
                 134. ThreadAbortException (System.Threading)\\
                 135. ThreadPriority (System.Threading)\\
                 136. ThreadStart (System.Threading)\\
                 137. ThreadState (System.Threading)\\
                 138. ThreadStateException (System.Threading)\\
                 139. Timeout (System.Threading)\\
                 140. Timer (System.Threading)\\
                 141. TimerCallback (System.Threading)\\
                 142. WaitHandle (System.Threading)\\
                 143. TimeSpan (System)\\
                 144. Type (System)\\
                 145. TypeInitializationException (System)\\
                 146. UInt16 (System)\\
                 147. UInt32 (System)\\
                 148. UInt64 (System)\\
                 149. UnauthorizedAccessException (System)\\
                 150. ValueType (System)\\
                 151. Version (System)\\
                 Index",
}

@Misc{Abraxas:pcyacc,
  author =       "{Abraxas Software, Inc.}",
  title =        "{PCYACC} 2.0",
  year =         "1987",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  note =         "7033 SW Macadam Ave., Portland, OR 97219.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Misc{ACW:software,
  author =       "The Austin Code Works",
  title =        "Purveyors of software",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  note =         "11100 Leafwood Lane, Austin, TX 78750-3409.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Aczel:1999:GEE,
  author =       "Amir D. Aczel",
  title =        "{God}'s Equation: {Einstein}, Relativity, and the
                 Expanding Universe",
  publisher =    "Four Walls Eight Windows",
  address =      "New York, NY, USA",
  pages =        "xvii + 236",
  year =         "1999",
  ISBN =         "1-56858-139-4",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-1-56858-139-2",
  LCCN =         "QB981 .A35 1999",
  bibdate =      "Wed Jul 01 10:18:15 2009",
  bibsource =    "aubrey.tamu.edu:7090/voyager;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/einstein.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  tableofcontents = "Preface \\
                 1. Exploding Stars / 1 \\
                 2. Early Einstein / 13 \\
                 3. Prague, 1911 / 27 \\
                 4. Euclid's Riddle / 43 \\
                 5. Grossmann's Notebooks / 61 \\
                 6. The Crimean Expedition / 71 \\
                 7. Riemann's Metric / 91 \\
                 8. Berlin / 105 \\
                 9. Principe Island / 121 \\
                 10. The Joint Meeting / 139 \\
                 11. Cosmological Considerations / 149 \\
                 12. The Expansion of Space / 167 \\
                 13. The Nature of Matter / 181 \\
                 14. The Geometry of the Universe / 189 \\
                 15. Batavia, Illinois, May 4, 1998 / 197 \\
                 16. God's Equation / 207 \\
                 References / 221 \\
                 Index / 225",
}

@Book{Aczel:2009:UWS,
  author =       "Amir D. Aczel",
  title =        "Uranium wars: the scientific rivalry that created the
                 nuclear age",
  publisher =    "Palgrave Macmillan",
  address =      "New York, NY, USA",
  pages =        "248 + 8",
  year =         "2009",
  ISBN =         "0-230-61374-8",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-230-61374-4",
  LCCN =         "QC773.A1 A28 2009",
  bibdate =      "Sat Oct 3 09:57:51 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 z3950.loc.gov:7090/Voyager",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  subject =      "nuclear weapons; research; history; 20th Century;
                 nuclear physics; nuclear energy; science and state;
                 uranium as fuel",
  tableofcontents = "Physics and Uranium \\
                 On the trail of the nucleus \\
                 The draw of radioactivity \\
                 The Meitner--Hahn discovery \\
                 Enrico Fermi \\
                 The Rome experiments \\
                 The events of 1938 \\
                 That Christmas \\
                 The Heisenberg menace \\
                 Chain reaction \\
                 Copenhagen \\
                 Truth \\
                 Building the bomb \\
                 Decision to use the bomb \\
                 The spying operation \\
                 The Cold War \\
                 Uranium's future",
}

@Book{Aczel:2010:PCS,
  author =       "Amir D. Aczel",
  title =        "Present at the Creation: the Story of {CERN} and the
                 {Large Hadron Collider}",
  publisher =    "Harmony Books",
  address =      "New York, NY, USA",
  pages =        "xvi + 271 + 8",
  year =         "2010",
  ISBN =         "0-307-59167-0",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-307-59167-8",
  LCCN =         "QC787.P73 A29 2010",
  bibdate =      "Mon Oct 18 15:38:58 MDT 2010",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/bibnet/authors/f/feynman-richard-p.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 z3950.loc.gov:7090/Voyager",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  subject =      "Large Hadron Collider (France and Switzerland);
                 colliders (nuclear physics)",
  tableofcontents = "The exploding protons \\
                 The LHC and our age-old quest to understand the
                 structure of the universe \\
                 A place called CERN \\
                 Building the greatest machine in history \\
                 LHCb and the mystery of the missing antimatter \\
                 Richard Feynman and a prelude to the standard model \\
                 ``Who ordered that?'': the discoveries of leaping
                 leptons \\
                 Symmetries of nature, Yang--Mills theory, and quarks
                 \\
                 Hunting the Higgs \\
                 How the Higgs sprang alive inside a red Camaro (and
                 gave birth to three bosons) \\
                 Dark matter, dark energy, and the fate of the universe
                 \\
                 Looking for strings and hidden dimensions \\
                 Will CERN create a black hole? \\
                 The LHC and the future of physics \\
                 Afterword \\
                 Appendix A: How does an LHC detector work? \\
                 Appendix B: Particles, forces, and the standard model
                 \\
                 Appendix C: The key physics principles used in this
                 book",
}

@Book{Aczel:2011:SWL,
  author =       "Amir D. Aczel",
  title =        "A Strange Wilderness: the Lives of the Great
                 Mathematicians",
  publisher =    "Sterling",
  address =      "New York, NY, USA",
  pages =        "xix + 284",
  year =         "2011",
  ISBN =         "1-4027-8584-4 (hardback), 1-4027-9085-6 (e-book)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-1-4027-8584-9 (hardback), 978-1-4027-9085-0
                 (e-book)",
  LCCN =         "QA21 .A29 2011",
  bibdate =      "Thu Jun 7 16:36:39 MDT 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/cryptography2010.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/fibquart.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 z3950.loc.gov:7090/Voyager",
  abstract =     "Bestselling popular science author Amir Aczel selects
                 the most fascinating individuals and stories in the
                 history of mathematics, presenting a colorful narrative
                 that explores the quirky personalities behind some of
                 the most profound, enduring theorems. Through such
                 mathematical geniuses as Archimedes, Leonardo of Pisa
                 (a.k.a. Fibonacci), Tartaglia (`the stutterer'),
                 Descartes, Gottfried Leibniz, Carl Gauss, Joseph
                 Fourier (Napoleon's mathematician), Evariste Galois,
                 Georg Cantor, Ramanujan, and `Nicholas Bourbaki,' we
                 gather little known details about the alliances and
                 rivalries that profoundly impacted the development of
                 what the scheming doctor-turned-mathematician Geronimo
                 Girolamo called `The Great Art'. This story of
                 mathematics is not your dry `college textbook' account;
                 tales of duels, battlefield heroism, flamboyant
                 arrogance, pranks, secret societies, imprisonment,
                 feuds, theft, and even some fatal errors of judgment
                 fill these pages (clearly, genius doesn't guarantee
                 street smarts). Ultimately, readers will come away from
                 this book entertained, with a newfound appreciation of
                 the tenacity, complexity, eccentricity, and brilliance
                 of the mathematical genius",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  subject =      "Mathematics; History; Mathematicians",
  tableofcontents = "Hellenic foundations \\
                 God is number \\
                 Plato's Academy \\
                 Alexandria \\
                 The East \\
                 The House of Wisdom \\
                 Medieval China \\
                 Renaissance mathematics \\
                 Italian shenanigans \\
                 Heresy \\
                 To calculus and beyond \\
                 The gentleman soldier \\
                 The greatest rivalry \\
                 Geniuses of the Enlightenment \\
                 Upheaval in France \\
                 Napoleon's mathematicians \\
                 Duel at dawn \\
                 Toward a new mathematics \\
                 Infinity and mental illness \\
                 Unlikely heroes \\
                 The strangest wilderness",
}

@Article{Ada79:rationale,
  author =       "Anonymous",
  key =          "Ada",
  title =        "Rationale for the Design of the {Ada} Programming
                 Language",
  journal =      j-SIGPLAN,
  volume =       "14",
  number =       "6B",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "1979",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  note =         "The final standard is \cite{ANSI:ada}.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Article{Ada79:refman,
  author =       "Anonymous",
  key =          "Ada",
  title =        "Preliminary {Ada} Reference Manual",
  journal =      j-SIGPLAN,
  volume =       "14",
  number =       "6A",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "1979",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  note =         "The final standard is \cite{ANSI:ada}.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Manual{ADA:1992:TRF,
  author =       "{Adobe Developers Association}",
  title =        "{TIFF} Revision 6.0: Final",
  howpublished = "World-Wide Web document",
  organization = "Adobe Systems Incorporated",
  address =      "1585 Charleston Road P.O. Box 7900 Mountain View, CA
                 94039-7900",
  day =          "3",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "1992",
  bibdate =      "Thu Nov 06 14:44:07 2003",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  note =         "Includes TIFF Specification Supplement 1 (enhancements
                 for Adobe PageMaker 6.0) [14-Sep-1995] and TIFF
                 Specification Supplement 2 (enhancements for Adobe
                 Photoshop) [22-Mar-2002]. Hypertext linked for Web
                 access.",
  URL =          "http://home.earthlink.net/~ritter/tiff/ (The
                 Unofficial TIFF Home Page);
                 http://partners.adobe.com/asn/tech/tiff/specification.jsp",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  keywords =     "TIFF (Tagged Image File Format) specification",
}

@Book{Adams:1992:FHC,
  author =       "Jeanne C. Adams and Walter S. Brainerd and Jerrold L.
                 Wagener",
  title =        "{Fortran 90} Handbook: Complete {ANSI\slash ISO}
                 Reference",
  publisher =    pub-MCGRAW-HILL,
  address =      pub-MCGRAW-HILL:adr,
  pages =        "xi + 740",
  year =         "1992",
  ISBN =         "0-07-000406-4",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-07-000406-1",
  LCCN =         "QA76.73.F28 F67 1992",
  bibdate =      "Sat Jun 17 12:29:56 2000",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/fortran3.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  note =         "See \cite{ANSI:ftn92}.",
  price =        "US\$79.50",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  keywords =     "Computer Programming; Fortran; Fortran 90 (computer
                 program language); Programming Languages",
  libnote =      "Not yet in my library.",
  tableofcontents = "0. Sneak Preview \\
                 1. Introduction \\
                 1.1. History \\
                 1.2. Why a New Standard? \\
                 1.3. Why Not Use Another Language? \\
                 1.4. Development of Fortran 90 \\
                 1.5. Fortran 77 Compatibility \\
                 1.6. Extensibility \\
                 1.7. Intrinsic and Standard Modules \\
                 1.8. The Fortran 90 Language Standard \\
                 1.9. References \\
                 2. Fortran Concepts and Terms \\
                 2.1. Scope and Association \\
                 2.2. Program Organization \\
                 2.3. Data Environment \\
                 2.4. Program Execution \\
                 2.5. Terms \\
                 2.6. Summary of Forms \\
                 2.7. Ordering Requirements \\
                 2.8. Example Fortran 90 Program \\
                 2.9. Summary \\
                 3. Language Elements and Source Form \\
                 3.1. The Processor Character Set \\
                 3.2. Lexical Tokens \\
                 3.3. Source Form \\
                 3.4. Rules for Fixed/Free Source Form \\
                 3.5. The INCLUDE Line \\
                 3.6. Low-Level Syntax \\
                 3.7. Summary \\
                 4. Data Types \\
                 4.1. Building the Data Environment for a Problem
                 Solution \\
                 4.2. What Is Meant by ``Type'' in Fortran? \\
                 4.3. Intrinsic Data Types \\
                 4.4. Derived Types \\
                 4.5. Structure Constructors \\
                 4.6. Array Constructors \\
                 4.7. Summary \\
                 5. Declarations \\
                 5.1. Type Declaration Statements \\
                 5.2. Implicit Typing \\
                 5.3. Array Properties \\
                 5.4. Pointer Properties \\
                 5.6. Object Accessibility and Use \\
                 5.7. Procedure Properties \\
                 5.8. Automatic Data Objects \\
                 5.9. NAMELIST Statement \\
                 5.10. Storage Association \\
                 5.11. Summary \\
                 6. Using Data \\
                 6.1. Constants and Variables \\
                 6.2. Substrings \\
                 6.3. Structure Components \\
                 6.4. Arrays \\
                 6.5. Pointers and Allocatable Arrays \\
                 6.6. Summary \\
                 7. Expressions and Assignment \\
                 7.1. Introduction to Fortran 90 Expressions \\
                 7.2. Formation of Expressions \\
                 7.3. Interpretation of Expressions \\
                 7.4. Evaluation of Expressions \\
                 7.5. Assignment \\
                 7.6. Summary \\
                 8. Controlling Execution \\
                 8.1. The Execution Sequence \\
                 8.2. Blocks and Executable Constructs \\
                 8.3. IF Construct and IF Statement \\
                 8.4. The CASE Construct \\
                 8.5. The DO Construct \\
                 8.6. Branching \\
                 8.7. Obsolescent Control Statements \\
                 8.8. Summary \\
                 9. Input and Output Processing \\
                 9.1. Records, Files, Access Methods, and Units \\
                 9.2. Data Transfer Statements \\
                 9.3. Execution Model for Data Transfer Statements \\
                 9.4. Error and Other Conditions in Input/Output
                 Statements \\
                 9.5. The OPEN Statement \\
                 9.6. The CLOSE Statement \\
                 9.7. Inquiring about Files \\
                 9.8. File Positioning Statements \\
                 9.9. Restrictions on Input/Output Specifiers, List
                 Items, and Statements \\
                 9.10. Summary \\
                 10. Input and Output Editing \\
                 10.1. Explicit Formatting \\
                 10.2. Format Specifications \\
                 10.3. Character String Edit Descriptor Form \\
                 10.4. Formatted Data Transfer \\
                 10.5. File Positioning by Format Control \\
                 10.6. Numeric Editing \\
                 10.7. Logical Editing \\
                 10.8. Character Editing \\
                 10.9. Control Edit Descriptors \\
                 10.10. List-Directed Formatting \\
                 10.11. Namelist Formatting \\
                 10.12. Summary \\
                 11. Program Units \\
                 11.1. Overview \\
                 11.2. Main Program \\
                 11.3. Internal Procedures \\
                 11.4. Host Association \\
                 11.5. External Subprograms \\
                 11.6. Modules \\
                 11.7. Block Data Program Units \\
                 11.8. Summary \\
                 12. Using Procedures \\
                 12.1. Procedure Terms and Concepts \\
                 12.2. Subroutines \\
                 12.3. Functions \\
                 12.4. Procedure-Related Statements \\
                 12.5. Argument Association \\
                 12.6. Procedure Interfaces \\
                 12.7. Summary \\
                 13. Intrinsic Procedures \\
                 13.1. Intrinsic Procedure Terms and Concepts \\
                 13.2. Representation Models \\
                 13.3. Inquiry and Numeric Manipulation Functions \\
                 13.4. Transfer and Conversion Functions \\
                 13.5. Computation Functions \\
                 13.6. Array Functions \\
                 13.7. Intrinsic Subroutines \\
                 13.8. Alphabetical List of All Intrinsic Procedures.
                 13.9. Specific Names for Generic Intrinsic Procedures.
                 13.10. Summary \\
                 14. Scope, Association, and Definition \\
                 14.1. The Use of Names \\
                 14.2. Scope \\
                 14.3. Association \\
                 14.4. Definition Status \\
                 Appendix A: Intrinsic Procedures \\
                 Appendix B: Fortran 90 Syntax \\
                 B.1. The Form of the Syntax \\
                 B.2. Syntax Rules and Constraints \\
                 B.3. Cross References \\
                 Appendix C: Decremental Features \\
                 C.1. Deleted Features \\
                 C.2. Obsolescent Features",
  xxauthor =     "Jeanne C. Adams and Walter S. Brainerd and Jeanne T.
                 Martin",
}

@Book{Adams:1997:FHC,
  editor =       "Jeanne C. Adams and Walter S. Brainerd and Jeanne T.
                 Martin and Brian T. Smith and Jerrold L. Wagener",
  title =        "{Fortran 95} Handbook: Complete {ISO\slash ANSI}
                 Reference",
  publisher =    pub-MIT,
  address =      pub-MIT:adr,
  pages =        "xii + 711",
  month =        nov,
  year =         "1997",
  ISBN =         "0-262-51096-0",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-262-51096-7",
  LCCN =         "QA76.73.F25 F6 1997",
  bibdate =      "Fri Dec 19 10:45:21 1997",
  bibsource =    "http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ISBN=0262510960/wholesaleproductA/;
                 http://www.cbooks.com/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/fortran3.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  series =       "Scientific and Engineering Computation",
  URL =          "http://www.cbooks.com/sqlnut/SP/search/gtsumt?source=&isbn=0262510960;
                 http://www.mitpress.com/book-home.tcl?isbn=0262510960",
  abstract =     "The \booktitle{Fortran 95 Handbook}, a comprehensive
                 reference work for the Fortran Programmer and
                 Implementor, contains a complete description of the
                 Fortran 95 programming language. The chapters follow
                 the same sequence of topics as the Fortran 95 standard,
                 but contain a more thorough and informal explanation of
                 the language's features and many more examples.
                 Appendices describe all the intrinsic features, the
                 deprecated features, and the complete syntax of the
                 language. In addition to an unusually thorough topical
                 index, there is an index of examples. Major new
                 features added in Fortran 95 are the FORALL statement
                 and construct, pure and elemental procedures, and
                 structure and pointer default initialization.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  tableofcontents = "1: What is Fortran 95? \\
                 2: Getting started \\
                 3: Types of data \\
                 4: Introducing arrays \\
                 5: Intrinsic procedures \\
                 6: Execution control \\
                 7: Introducing external procedures \\
                 8: More about data; the type declaration statement \\
                 9: Arrays and data manipulation \\
                 10: Modules \\
                 11: More about procedures \\
                 12: Advanced array features and derived types \\
                 13: Pointers \\
                 14: Overview \\
                 15: High Performance Fortran \\
                 Appendix A: Input and output \\
                 Appendix B: Bits \\
                 Appendix C: ISO\_VARYING\_STRINGS \\
                 Appendix D: Fortran 95's new features: summary \\
                 Appendix E: Fortran 95 statements \\
                 Appendix F: Fortran 95 intrinsic procedures \\
                 Appendix G: Answers to selected exercises",
}

@Book{Adobe:1985:PLR,
  author =       "{Adobe Systems Incorporated}",
  title =        "{PostScript} Language Reference Manual",
  publisher =    pub-AW,
  address =      pub-AW:adr,
  pages =        "ix + 321",
  year =         "{\noopsort{1985a}}1985",
  ISBN =         "0-201-10174-2",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-201-10174-4",
  LCCN =         "QA76.73.P67 A33 1985",
  bibdate =      "Sat Oct 28 08:25:13 2000",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Adobe:1985:PLT,
  author =       "{Adobe Systems Incorporated}",
  title =        "{PostScript} Language Tutorial and Cookbook",
  publisher =    pub-AW,
  address =      pub-AW:adr,
  pages =        "x + 243",
  year =         "{\noopsort{1985b}}1985",
  ISBN =         "0-201-10179-3",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-201-10179-9",
  LCCN =         "QA76.73.P67 A34 1985",
  bibdate =      "Sat Oct 28 08:25:05 2000",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  tableofcontents = "Stack and arithmetic \\
                 Beginning graphics \\
                 Procedures and variables \\
                 printing text \\
                 More graphics \\
                 Loops and conditional \\
                 Arrays \\
                 More fonts \\
                 Clipping and line details \\
                 Images \\
                 Postscript printers",
}

@Manual{Adobe:1988:DPS,
  author =       "Adobe Systems Incorporated",
  title =        "The Display {PostScript} System Reference",
  organization = pub-ADOBE,
  month =        oct # " 10",
  year =         "1988",
  bibdate =      "Sat Oct 28 08:25:11 2000",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Manual{Adobe:1990:ATF,
  author =       "Adobe Systems Incorporated",
  title =        "{Adobe} Type 1 Font Format",
  organization = pub-ADOBE,
  address =      pub-ADOBE:adr,
  month =        mar,
  year =         "1990",
  bibdate =      "Sat Oct 28 08:25:07 2000",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  partnumber =   "LPS0064",
}

@Book{Adobe:1990:PLR,
  author =       "{Adobe Systems Incorporated}",
  title =        "{PostScript} Language Reference Manual",
  publisher =    pub-AW,
  address =      pub-AW:adr,
  edition =      "Second",
  pages =        "viii + 764",
  year =         "1990",
  ISBN =         "0-201-18127-4",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-201-18127-2",
  LCCN =         "QA76.73.P67 P67 1990",
  bibdate =      "Sat Oct 28 08:25:15 2000",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/postscri.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  shorttableofcontents = "Basic ideas \\
                 Language \\
                 Graphics \\
                 Fonts \\
                 Rendering \\
                 Display postscript \\
                 Operator \\
                 Appendices \\
                 Bibliography \\
                 Index",
  tableofcontents = "Preface \\
                 Introduction \\
                 About This Manual \\
                 Evolution of the PostScript Language \\
                 LanguageLevel 3 Overview \\
                 Related Publications \\
                 Copyrights and Trademarks \\
                 Basic Ideas \\
                 Raster Output Devices \\
                 Scan Conversion \\
                 Page Description Languages \\
                 Using the PostScript Language \\
                 Language \\
                 Interpreter \\
                 Syntax \\
                 Data Types and Objects \\
                 Stacks \\
                 Execution \\
                 Overview of Basic Operators \\
                 Memory Management \\
                 File Input and Output \\
                 Named Resources \\
                 Functions \\
                 Errors \\
                 Early Name Binding \\
                 Filtered Files Details \\
                 Binary Encoding Details \\
                 Graphics \\
                 Imaging Model \\
                 Graphics State \\
                 Coordinate Systems and Transformations \\
                 Path Construction \\
                 Painting \\
                 User Paths \\
                 Forms \\
                 Color Spaces \\
                 Patterns \\
                 Images \\
                 Fonts \\
                 Organization and Use of Fonts \\
                 Font Dictionaries \\
                 Character Encoding \\
                 Glyph Metric Information \\
                 Font Cache \\
                 Unique ID Generation \\
                 Type 3 Fonts \\
                 Additional Base Font Types \\
                 Font Derivation and Modification \\
                 Composite Fonts \\
                 CID-Keyed Fonts \\
                 Device Control \\
                 Using Page Devices \\
                 Page Device Parameters \\
                 In-RIP Trapping \\
                 Output Device Dictionary \\
                 Rendering \\
                 CIE-Based Color to Device Color \\
                 Conversions among Device Color Spaces \\
                 Transfer Functions \\
                 Halftones \\
                 Scan Conversion Details \\
                 Operators \\
                 Operator Summary \\
                 Operator Details \\
                 LanguageLevel Feature Summary \\
                 LanguageLevel 3 Features \\
                 LanguageLevel 2 Features \\
                 Incompatibilities \\
                 Implementation Limits \\
                 Typical Limits \\
                 Virtual Memory Use \\
                 Interpreter Parameters \\
                 Properties of User and System Parameters \\
                 Defined User and System Parameters \\
                 Details of User and System Parameters \\
                 Device Parameters \\
                 Compatibility Strategies \\
                 The LanguageLevel Approach \\
                 When to Provide Compatibility \\
                 Compatibility Techniques \\
                 Installing Emulations \\
                 Character Sets and Encoding Vectors \\
                 Times Family \\
                 Helvetica Family \\
                 Courier Family \\
                 Symbol \\
                 Standard Latin Character Set \\
                 StandardEncoding Encoding Vector \\
                 ISOLatin1Encoding Encoding Vector \\
                 CE Encoding Vector \\
                 Expert Character Set \\
                 Expert Encoding Vector \\
                 ExpertSubset Encoding Vector \\
                 Symbol Character Set 786 \\
                 Symbol Encoding Vector \\
                 System Name Encodings \\
                 Operator Usage Guidelines \\
                 Bibliography \\
                 Index",
  xxauthor =     "Ed Taft and Jeff Walden and Paul Engstrom",
}

@Book{Adobe:1993:PDP,
  author =       "{Adobe Systems Incorporated}",
  title =        "Programming the {Display PostScript System} with {X}",
  publisher =    pub-AW,
  address =      pub-AW:adr,
  year =         "1993",
  ISBN =         "0-201-62203-3",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-201-62203-4",
  LCCN =         "QA76.73.P67 D57 1993",
  bibdate =      "Sat Aug 27 10:53:05 1994",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  price =        "US\$29.95",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Adobe:1997:AFA,
  author =       "{Adobe Press}",
  title =        "{Adobe FAQ}: {Adobe}'s most frequently asked questions
                 answered",
  publisher =    pub-ADOBE-PRESS,
  address =      pub-ADOBE-PRESS:adr,
  pages =        "xvi + 774",
  year =         "1997",
  ISBN =         "1-56830-372-6",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-1-56830-372-7",
  LCCN =         "QA76.754 .A36 1997",
  bibdate =      "Fri Aug 21 12:48:20 1998",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  note =         "Includes CD-ROM.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  annote =       "Covers Adobe Acrobat 3.0 (Capture, Distiller,
                 Exchange, Reader), After Effects 3.1, FontFolio 7.09,
                 Framemaker 5 Illustrator 7.0, PageMaker 6.5, PageMill
                 2.0, Persuasion 4.0 PhotoShop 4.0, Premiere 4.2
                 SiteMill 1.0, and Type Manager Deluxe.",
}

@Book{Adobe:1999:PLR,
  author =       "{Adobe Systems Incorporated}",
  title =        "{PostScript} Language Reference",
  publisher =    pub-AW,
  address =      pub-AW:adr,
  edition =      "Third",
  pages =        "xii + 897",
  year =         "1999",
  ISBN =         "0-201-37922-8",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-201-37922-8",
  LCCN =         "QA76.73.P67 P67 1999",
  bibdate =      "Tue Dec 05 18:14:16 2000",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  note =         "This new edition defines PostScript Language Level 3.
                 An electronic version of the book is available at the
                 Adobe Web site, and is also included in a CD-ROM
                 attached to the book.",
  price =        "US\$49.95, CDN\$74.95",
  URL =          "http://partners.adobe.com/asn/developer/PDFS/TN/PLRM.pdf;
                 http://partners.adobe.com/supportservice/devrelations/PDFS/TN/PLRM.pdf",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  tableofcontents = "Preface \\
                 Introduction \\
                 About This Manual \\
                 Evolution of the PostScript Language \\
                 LanguageLevel 3 Overview \\
                 Related Publications \\
                 Copyrights and Trademarks \\
                 Basic Ideas \\
                 Raster Output Devices \\
                 Scan Conversion \\
                 Page Description Languages \\
                 Using the PostScript Language \\
                 Language \\
                 Interpreter \\
                 Syntax \\
                 Data Types and Objects \\
                 Stacks \\
                 Execution \\
                 Overview of Basic Operators \\
                 Memory Management \\
                 File Input and Output \\
                 Named Resources \\
                 Functions \\
                 Errors \\
                 Early Name Binding \\
                 Filtered Files Details \\
                 Binary Encoding Details \\
                 Graphics \\
                 Imaging Model \\
                 Graphics State \\
                 Coordinate Systems and Transformations \\
                 Path Construction \\
                 Painting \\
                 User Paths \\
                 Forms \\
                 Color Spaces \\
                 Patterns \\
                 Images \\
                 Fonts \\
                 Organization and Use of Fonts \\
                 Font Dictionaries \\
                 Character Encoding \\
                 Glyph Metric Information \\
                 Font Cache \\
                 Unique ID Generation \\
                 Type 3 Fonts \\
                 Additional Base Font Types \\
                 Font Derivation and Modification \\
                 Composite Fonts \\
                 CID-Keyed Fonts \\
                 Device Control \\
                 Using Page Devices \\
                 Page Device Parameters \\
                 In-RIP Trapping \\
                 Output Device Dictionary \\
                 Rendering \\
                 CIE-Based Color to Device Color \\
                 Conversions among Device Color Spaces \\
                 Transfer Functions \\
                 Halftones \\
                 Scan Conversion Details \\
                 Operators \\
                 Operator Summary \\
                 Operator Details \\
                 LanguageLevel Feature Summary \\
                 LanguageLevel 3 Features \\
                 LanguageLevel 2 Features \\
                 Incompatibilities \\
                 Implementation Limits \\
                 Typical Limits \\
                 Virtual Memory Use \\
                 Interpreter Parameters \\
                 Properties of User and System Parameters \\
                 Defined User and System Parameters \\
                 Details of User and System Parameters \\
                 Device Parameters \\
                 Compatibility Strategies \\
                 The LanguageLevel Approach \\
                 When to Provide Compatibility \\
                 Compatibility Techniques \\
                 Installing Emulations \\
                 Character Sets and Encoding Vectors \\
                 Times Family \\
                 Helvetica Family \\
                 Courier Family \\
                 Symbol \\
                 Standard Latin Character Set \\
                 StandardEncoding Encoding Vector \\
                 ISOLatin1Encoding Encoding Vector \\
                 CE Encoding Vector \\
                 Expert Character Set \\
                 Expert Encoding Vector \\
                 ExpertSubset Encoding Vector \\
                 Symbol Character Set 786 \\
                 Symbol Encoding Vector \\
                 System Name Encodings \\
                 Operator Usage Guidelines \\
                 Bibliography \\
                 Index",
}

@Book{Adobe:2000:PRA,
  author =       "{Adobe Systems Incorporated}",
  title =        "{PDF} Reference: {Adobe} Portable Document Format,
                 Version 1.3",
  publisher =    pub-AW,
  address =      pub-AW:adr,
  edition =      "Second",
  pages =        "xvi + 679",
  year =         "2000",
  ISBN =         "0-201-61588-6 (paperback)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-201-61588-3 (paperback)",
  LCCN =         "QA76.76.T49 P38 2000",
  bibdate =      "Wed Sep 20 11:06:40 2000",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/postscri.bib",
  price =        "US\$49.95",
  URL =          "http://partners.adobe.com/asn/developer/acrosdk/DOCS/PDFRef.pdf",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Adobe:AT1.190,
  author =       "Adobe Systems Incorporated",
  title =        "{Adobe} Type 1 Font Format---Version 1.1",
  publisher =    pub-AW,
  address =      pub-AW:adr,
  pages =        "iii + 103",
  month =        aug,
  year =         "1990",
  ISBN =         "0-201-57044-0",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-201-57044-1",
  LCCN =         "QA76.73.P67 A36 1990",
  bibdate =      "Sat Oct 28 08:24:48 2000",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  price =        "US\$14.95",
  URL =          "http://partners.adobe.com/asn/developer/pdfs/tn/T1_SPEC.PDF",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Misc{Adobe:colophon,
  author =       "Adobe Systems Incorporated",
  title =        "{Colophon}: {Adobe Systems News} {Publication}",
  bibdate =      "Sat Oct 28 08:25:09 2000",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@TechReport{Adobe:docstruct-spec,
  author =       "{PostScript Developer Support Group}",
  title =        "{Document Structuring Conventions} Specification,
                 Version 2.1",
  number =       "PN LPS5001",
  institution =  pub-ADOBE,
  address =      pub-ADOBE:adr,
  month =        jan # " 16",
  year =         "1989",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  note =         "Available electronically from
                 \path|ps-file-server@adobe.com| in response to an
                 e-mail request {\tt send Documents
                 \path|struct.ps.Zba|}. The request {\tt send Index}
                 will return a complete index for the server.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@TechReport{Adobe:epsf-spec,
  author =       "{Adobe PostScript Developer Support Group}",
  title =        "{Encapsulated PostScript Files} Specification Version
                 2.0",
  number =       "PN LPS5002",
  institution =  pub-ADOBE,
  address =      pub-ADOBE:adr,
  month =        jun # " 5",
  year =         "1989",
  bibdate =      "Sat Aug 27 10:55:59 1994",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  note =         "Available electronically from
                 \path|ps-file-server@adobe.com| in response to an
                 e-mail request {\tt send Documents EPSF.ps.Zba}. The
                 request {\tt send Index} will return a complete index
                 for the server. The version 3.0 specification is
                 published in \cite[Appendix~H]{Adobe:1990:PLR}.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Aho:1972:TPT,
  author =       "Alfred V. Aho and Jeffrey D. Ullman",
  title =        "The Theory of Parsing, Translation, and Compiling.
                 {I}: Parsing",
  volume =       "I",
  publisher =    pub-PH,
  address =      pub-PH:adr,
  pages =        "xviii + 542",
  year =         "1972",
  ISBN =         "0-13-914556-7",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-13-914556-8",
  LCCN =         "QA76.6 .A286 1972-73",
  bibdate =      "Wed Dec 15 15:01:28 1993",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/string-matching.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  tableofcontents = "0: Mathematical preliminaries \\
                 1: An introduction to compiling \\
                 2: Elements of language theory \\
                 3: Theory of translation \\
                 4: General parsing methods \\
                 5: One-pass no backtrack parsing \\
                 6: Limited backtrack parsing algorithms",
}

@Book{Aho:1973:TPT,
  author =       "Alfred V. Aho and Jeffrey D. Ullman",
  title =        "The Theory of Parsing, Translation, and Compiling.
                 {II}. {Compiling}",
  volume =       "II",
  publisher =    pub-PH,
  address =      pub-PH:adr,
  pages =        "xiii + 460",
  year =         "1973",
  ISBN =         "0-13-914564-8",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-13-914564-3",
  LCCN =         "QA76.6 .A286 1972-73",
  bibdate =      "Wed Dec 15 15:01:25 1993",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/string-matching.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  tableofcontents = "7: Techniques for parser optimization \\
                 8: Theory of deterministic parsing \\
                 9: Translation and code generation \\
                 10: Bookkeeping \\
                 11: Code optimization",
}

@Book{Aho:1974:DAC,
  author =       "Alfred V. Aho and John E. Hopcroft and Jeffrey D.
                 Ullman",
  title =        "The Design and Analysis of Computer Algorithms",
  publisher =    pub-AW,
  address =      pub-AW:adr,
  pages =        "x + 470",
  year =         "1974",
  ISBN =         "0-201-00029-6",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-201-00029-0",
  LCCN =         "QA76.6 .A284 1974",
  bibdate =      "Tue Dec 14 22:34:07 1993",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/string-matching.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  tableofcontents = "1. Models of computation \\
                 2. Design of efficient algorithms \\
                 3. Sorting and order statistics \\
                 4. Data structures for set manipulation problems \\
                 5. Algorithms on graphs \\
                 6. Matrix multiplication and related operations \\
                 7. The Fast Fourier Transform and its applications \\
                 8. Integer and polynomial arithmetic \\
                 9. Pattern-matching algorithms \\
                 10. NP-complete problems \\
                 11. Some provably intractable problems \\
                 12. Lower bounds on numbers of arithmetic operations",
}

@Book{Aho:1977:PCD,
  author =       "Alfred V. Aho and Jeffrey D. Ullman",
  title =        "Principles of Compiler Design",
  publisher =    pub-AW,
  address =      pub-AW:adr,
  pages =        "x + 604",
  year =         "1977",
  ISBN =         "0-201-00022-9 (hardcover), 0-201-10073-8",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-201-00022-1 (hardcover), 978-0-201-10073-0",
  LCCN =         "QA76.6 .A285 1977",
  bibdate =      "Tue Dec 14 22:34:24 1993",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/fortran1.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/fortran2.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/unix.bib",
  note =         "See also the much expanded subsequent book
                 \cite{Aho:1986:CPC}.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  remark =       "This is commonly called the ``green dragon'' book,
                 after its colorful cover design.",
  tableofcontents = "1: Introduction to Compilers \\
                 1.1 Compilers and translators / 1 \\
                 1.2 Why do we need translators? / 3 \\
                 1.3 The structure of a compiler / 5 \\
                 1.4 Lexical analysis / 10 \\
                 1.5 Syntax analysis / 12 \\
                 1.6 Intermediate code generation / 13 \\
                 1.7 Optimization / 17 \\
                 1.8 Code generation / 19 \\
                 1.9 Bookkeeping / 20 \\
                 1.10 Error handling / 21 \\
                 1.11 Compiler-writing tools / 21 \\
                 1.12 Getting started / 23 \\
                 2: Programming Languages \\
                 2.1 High-level programming languages / 26 \\
                 2.2 Definitions of programming languages / 28 \\
                 2.3 The lexical and syntactic structure of a language /
                 32 \\
                 2.4 Data elements / 34 \\
                 2.5 Data structures / 38 \\
                 2.6 Operators / 45 \\
                 2.7 Assignment / 50 \\
                 2.8 Statements / 53 \\
                 2.9 Program units / 55 \\
                 2.10 Data environments / 57 \\
                 2.11 Parameter transmission / 59 \\
                 2.12 Storage management / 63 \\
                 3: Finite Automata and Lexical Analysis \\
                 3.1 The role of the lexical analyzer 7 / 4 \\
                 3.2 A simple approach to the design of lexical
                 analyzers / 76 \\
                 3.3 Regular expressions / 82 \\
                 3.4 Finite automata / 88 \\
                 3.5 From regular expressions to finite automata / 95
                 \\
                 3.6 Minimizing the number of slates of a DFA / 99 \\
                 3.7 A language for specifying lexical analyzers / 103
                 \\
                 3.8 Implementation of a lexical analyzer / 109 \\
                 3.9 The scanner generator as Swiss army knife / 118 \\
                 4: The Syntactic Specification of Programming Languages
                 \\
                 4.1 Context-free grammars / 126 \\
                 4.2 Derivations and parse trees / 129 \\
                 4.3 Capabilities of context-free grammars / 136 \\
                 5: Basic Parsing Techniques \\
                 5.1 Parsers / 146 \\
                 5.2 Shift--reduce parsing / 150 \\
                 5.3 Operator-precedence parsing / 158 \\
                 5.4 Top-down parsing / 174 \\
                 5.5 Predictive parsers / 184 \\
                 6: Automatic Construction of Efficient Parsers \\
                 6.1 LR parsers / 198 \\
                 6.2 The canonical collection of LR(0) items / 204 \\
                 6.3 Constructing SLR parsing tables / 211 \\
                 6.4 Constructing canonical LR parsing tables / 214 \\
                 6.5 Constructing LALR parsing tables / 219 \\
                 6.6 Using ambiguous grammars / 225 \\
                 6.7 An automatic parser generator / 229 \\
                 6.8 Implementation of LR parsing tables / 233 \\
                 6.9 Constructing LALR sets of items / 236 \\
                 7: Syntax-Directed Translation \\
                 7.1 Syntax-directed translation schemes / 246 \\
                 7.2 Implementation of syntax-directed translators / 249
                 \\
                 7.3 Intermediate code / 254 \\
                 7.4 Postfix notation / 254 \\
                 7.5 Parse trees and syntax trees / 258 \\
                 7.6 Three-address code, quadruples, and triples / 259
                 \\
                 7.7 Translation of assignment statements / 265 \\
                 7.8 Boolean expressions / 271 \\
                 7.9 Statements that alter the flow of control / 281 \\
                 7.10 Postfix translations / 286 \\
                 7.11 Translation with a top-down parser / 290 \\
                 8: More About Translation \\
                 8.1 Array references in arithmetic expressions / 296
                 \\
                 8.2 Procedure calls / 303 \\
                 8.3 Declarations / 307 \\
                 8.4 Case statements / 308 \\
                 8.5 Record structures / 312 \\
                 8.6 PL/I-style structures / 317 \\
                 9: Symbol Tables \\
                 9.1 The contents of a symbol table / 328 \\
                 9.2 Data structures for symbol tables / 336 \\
                 9.3 Representing scope information / 341 \\
                 10: Run-time Storage Administration \\
                 10.1 Implementation of a simple stack allocation scheme
                 / 351 \\
                 10.2 Implementation of block-structured languages / 356
                 \\
                 10.3 Storage allocation in FORTRAN / 364 \\
                 10.4 Storage allocation in block-structured languages /
                 377 \\
                 11: Error Detection and Recovery \\
                 11.1 Errors / 382 \\
                 11.2 Lexical-phase errors / 388 \\
                 11.3 Syntactic-phase errors / 391 \\
                 11.4 Semantic errors / 402 \\
                 12: Introduction to Code Optimization \\
                 12.1 The principal sources of optimization / 408 \\
                 12.2 Loop optimization / 410 \\
                 12.3 The DAG representation of basic blocks / 418 \\
                 12.4 Value numbers and algebraic laws / 427 \\
                 12.5 Global data-flow analysis / 429 \\
                 13: More About Loop Optimization \\
                 13.1 Dominators / 442 \\
                 13.2 Reducible flow graphs / 447 \\
                 13.3 Depth-first search / 449 \\
                 13.4 Loop-invariant computations / 454 \\
                 13.5 Induction variable elimination / 466 \\
                 13.6 Some other loop optimizations / 471 \\
                 14: More About Data-Flow Analysis \\
                 14.1 Reaching definitions again / 478 \\
                 14.2 Available expressions / 482 \\
                 14.3 Copy propagation / 487 \\
                 14.4 Backward flow problems / 489 \\
                 14.5 Very busy expressions and code hoisting / 491 \\
                 14.6 The four kinds of data-flow analysis problems /
                 497 \\
                 14.7 Handling pointers / 499 \\
                 14.8 Interprocedural data-flow analysis / 504 \\
                 14.9 Putting it all together / 511 \\
                 15: Code Generation \\
                 15.1 Object programs / 518 \\
                 15.2 Problems in code generation / 521 \\
                 15.3 A machine model / 523 \\
                 15.4 A simple code generator / 525 \\
                 15.5 Register allocation and assignment / 533 \\
                 15.6 Code generation from DAG's / 537 \\
                 15.7 Peephole optimization / 548 \\
                 Appendix A: A Look at Some Compilers \\
                 A.1 The C compilers / 557 \\
                 A.2 The FORTRAN H compiler / 559 \\
                 A.3 The BLISS/11 compiler / 561 \\
                 Appendix B: A Compiler Project \\
                 B.1 Introduction / 563 \\
                 B.2 A PASCAL Subset / 563 \\
                 B.3 Program structure / 566 \\
                 B.4 Lexical conventions / 566 \\
                 B.5 Suggested exercises / 567 \\
                 B.6 Some extensions / 569 \\
                 Bibliography / 570 \\
                 Index / 592",
}

@Book{Aho:1986:CPC,
  author =       "Alfred V. Aho and Ravi Sethi and Jeffrey D. Ullman",
  title =        "Compilers: Principles, Techniques, and Tools",
  publisher =    pub-AW,
  address =      pub-AW:adr,
  pages =        "x + 796",
  year =         "1986",
  ISBN =         "0-201-10088-6 (hardcover), 0-201-10194-7 (paperback)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-201-10088-4 (hardcover), 978-0-201-10194-2
                 (paperback)",
  LCCN =         "QA76.76.C65 A371 1986",
  bibdate =      "Tue Dec 14 22:33:59 1993",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/fortran2.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/unix.bib",
  note =         "See \cite{Aho:1977:PCD}.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  remark =       "This is commonly called the ``red dragon'' book, after
                 its colorful cover design.",
  shorttableofcontents = "1: Introduction to Compiling / 1 \\
                 2: A Simple One-Pass Compiler / 25 \\
                 3: Lexical Analysis / 83 \\
                 4: Syntax Analysis / 159 \\
                 5: Syntax-Directed Translation / 279 \\
                 6: Type Checking / 343 \\
                 7: Run-Time Environments / 389 \\
                 8: Intermediate Code Generation / 463 \\
                 9: Code Generation / 513 \\
                 10: Code Optimization / 585 \\
                 11: Want to Write a Compiler? / 723 \\
                 12: A Look at Some Compilers / 733 \\
                 Appendix A: Compiler Project / 745 \\
                 Bibliography / 752 \\
                 Index / 780",
  tableofcontents = "1: Introduction to Compiling / 1 \\
                 1.1 Compilers / 1 \\
                 1.2 Analysis of the source program / 4 \\
                 1.3 The phases of a compiler / 10 \\
                 1.4 Cousins of the compiler / 16 \\
                 1.5 The grouping of phases / 20 \\
                 1.6 Compiler-construction tools / 22 \\
                 Bibliographic notes / 23 \\
                 2: A Simple One-Pass Compiler / 25 \\
                 2.1 Overview / 25 \\
                 2.2 Syntax definition / 26 \\
                 2.3 Syntax-directed translation / 33 \\
                 2.4 Parsing / 40 \\
                 2.5 A translator for simple expressions / 48 \\
                 2.6 Lexical analysis / 54 \\
                 2.7 Incorporating a symbol table / 60 \\
                 2.8 Abstract stack machines / 62 \\
                 2.9 Putting the techniques together / 69 \\
                 Exercises / 78 \\
                 Bibliographic notes / 81 \\
                 3: Lexical Analysis / 83 \\
                 3.1 The role of the lexical analyzer / 84 \\
                 3.2 Input buffering / 88 \\
                 3.3 Specification of tokens / 92 \\
                 3.4 Recognition of tokens / 98 \\
                 3.5 A language for specifying lexical analyzers / 105
                 \\
                 3.6 Finite automata / 113 \\
                 3.7 From a regular expression to an NFA / 121 \\
                 3.8 Design of a lexical analyzer generator / 128 \\
                 3.9 Optimization of DFA-based pattern matchers / 134
                 \\
                 Exercises / 146 \\
                 Bibliographic notes / 157 \\
                 4: Syntax Analysis / 159 \\
                 4.1 The role of the par ser / 160 \\
                 4.2 Context-free grammars / 165 \\
                 4.3 Writing a grammar / 172 \\
                 4.4 Top-down parsing / 181 \\
                 4.5 Bottom-up par sing / 195 \\
                 4.6 Operator-precedence parsing / 203 \\
                 4.7 LR parsers / 215 \\
                 4.8 Using ambiguous grammars / 247 \\
                 4.9 Parser generators / 257 \\
                 Exercises / 267 \\
                 Bibliographic notes / 277 \\
                 5: Syntax-Directed Translation / 279 \\
                 5.1 Syntax-directed definitions / 280 \\
                 5.2 Construction of syntax trees / 287 \\
                 5.3 Bottom-up evaluation of S-attributed definition s /
                 293 \\
                 5.4 L-attributed definitions / 296 \\
                 5.5 Top-down translation / 302 \\
                 5.6 Bottom-up evaluation of inherited attributes / 308
                 \\
                 5.7 Recursive evaluators / 316 \\
                 5.8 Space for attribute values at compile time / 320
                 \\
                 5.9 Assigning space at compiler-construction time / 323
                 \\
                 5.10 Analysis of syntax-directed definitions / 329 \\
                 Exercises / 336 \\
                 Bibliographic notes / 340 \\
                 6: Type Checking / 343 \\
                 6.1 Type systems / 344 \\
                 6.2 Specification of a simple type checker / 348 \\
                 6.3 Equivalence of type expressions / 352 \\
                 6.4 Type conversions / 359 \\
                 6.5 Overloading of functions and operators / 361 \\
                 6.6 Polymorphic functions / 364 \\
                 6.7 An algorithm for unification / 376 \\
                 Exercises / 381 \\
                 Bibliographic notes / 386 \\
                 7: Run-Time Environments / 389 \\
                 7.1 Source language issues / 389 \\
                 7.2 Storage organization / 396 \\
                 7.3 Storage-allocation strategies / 401 \\
                 7.4 Access to nonlocal names / 411 \\
                 7.5 Parameter passing / 424 \\
                 7.6 Symbol tables / 429 \\
                 7.7 Language facilities for dynamic storage allocation
                 / 440 \\
                 7.8 Dynamic storage allocation techniques / 442 \\
                 7.9 Storage allocation in Fortran / 446 \\
                 Exercises / 455 \\
                 Bibliographic notes / 461 \\
                 8: Intermediate Code Generation / 463 \\
                 8.1 Intermediate languages / 464 \\
                 8.2 Declarations / 473 \\
                 8.3 Assignment statements / 478 \\
                 8.4 Boolean expressions / 488 \\
                 8.5 Case statements / 497 \\
                 8.6 Back patching / 500 \\
                 8.7 Procedure calls / 506 \\
                 Exercises / 508 \\
                 Bibliographic notes / 511 \\
                 9: Code Generation / 513 \\
                 9.1 Issues in the design of a code generator / 514 \\
                 9.2 The target machine / 519 \\
                 9.3 Run-time storage management / 522 \\
                 9.4 Basic blocks and flow graphs / 528 \\
                 9.5 Next-use information / 534 \\
                 9.6 A simple code generator / 535 \\
                 9.7 Register allocation and assignment / 541 \\
                 9.8 The dag representation of basic blocks / 546 \\
                 9.9 Peephole optimization / 554 \\
                 9.10 Generating code from dags / 557 \\
                 9.11 Dynamic programming code-generation algorithm /
                 567 \\
                 9.12 Code-generator generators / 572 \\
                 Exercises / 580 \\
                 Bibliographic notes / 583 \\
                 10: Code Optimization / 585 \\
                 1O.1 Introduction / 586 \\
                 10.2 The principal sources of optimization / 592 \\
                 10.3 Optimization of basic blocks / 598 \\
                 10.4 Loops in flow graphs / 602 \\
                 10.5 Introduction to global data-flow analysis / 608
                 \\
                 10.6 Iterative solution of data-flow equations / 624
                 \\
                 10.7 Code-improving transformations / 633 \\
                 10.8 Dealing with aliases / 648 \\
                 10.9 Data-flow analysis of structured flow graphs / 660
                 \\
                 10.10 Efficient data-flow algorithms / 671 \\
                 10.11 A tool for data-flow analysis / 680 \\
                 10.12 Estimation of types / 694 \\
                 10.13 Symbolic debugging of optimized code / 703 \\
                 Exercises / 711 \\
                 Bibliographic notes / 718 \\
                 11: Want to Write a Compiler? / 723 \\
                 11.1 Planning a compiler / 723 \\
                 11.2 Approaches to compiler development / 725 \\
                 11.3 The compiler-development environment / 729 \\
                 11.4 Testing and maintenance / 731 \\
                 12: A Look at Some Compilers / 733 \\
                 12.1 EQN, a preprocessor for typesetting mathematics /
                 733 \\
                 12.2 Compilers for Pascal / 734 \\
                 12.3 The C compilers / 735 \\
                 12.4 The Fortran H compilers / 737 \\
                 12.5 The Bliss/11 compiler / 740 \\
                 12.6 Modula-2 optimizing compiler / 742 \\
                 Appendix A: Compiler Project / 745 \\
                 A.1 Introduction / 745 \\
                 A.2 A Pascal subset / 745 \\
                 A.3 Program structure / 745 \\
                 A.4 Lexical conventions / 748 \\
                 A.5 Suggested exercises / 749 \\
                 A.6 Evolution of the interpreter / 750 \\
                 A.7 Extensions / 751 \\
                 Bibliography / 752 \\
                 Index / 780",
}

@Book{Aho:1988:APL,
  author =       "Alfred V. Aho and Brian W. Kernighan and Peter J.
                 Weinberger",
  key =          "AWK87",
  title =        "The {AWK} Programming Language",
  publisher =    pub-AW,
  address =      pub-AW:adr,
  pages =        "x + 210",
  year =         "1988",
  ISBN =         "0-201-07981-X",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-201-07981-4",
  LCCN =         "QA76.73.A95 A35 1988",
  MRclass =      "68N15, 68-01, 68N20, 68N25",
  bibdate =      "Sun May 02 07:44:41 1999",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/bibnet/subjects/acc-stab-num-alg.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/bibnet/subjects/han-wri-mat-sci-2ed.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/css.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/gnu.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/unix.bib",
  note =         "See also \cite{FSF:gawk,MKS:awk,Polytron:polyawk}.",
  ZMnumber =     "0751.68009",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  nb =           "the author order is AKW, but the key looks better as
                 AWK",
  shorttableofcontents = "1: An AWK Tutorial / \\
                 2: The AWK Language / \\
                 3: Data Processing / \\
                 4: Reports and Databases / \\
                 5: Processing Words / \\
                 6: Little Languages / \\
                 7: Experiments with Algorithms / \\
                 Make: A File Updating Program / \\
                 8: Epilog / \\
                 Appendix A: AWK Summary / \\
                 Appendix B: Answers to Selected Exercises / \\
                 Index",
  tableofcontents = "Preface / \\
                 1: An AWK Tutorial / \\
                 Getting Started / \\
                 Simple Output / \\
                 Fancier Output / \\
                 Selection / \\
                 Computing with AWK / \\
                 Control-Flow Statements / \\
                 Arrays / \\
                 A Handful of Useful ``One-liners'' / \\
                 What Next? / \\
                 2: The AWK Language / \\
                 Patterns / \\
                 Actions / \\
                 User-Defined Functions / \\
                 Output / \\
                 Input / \\
                 Interaction with Other Programs / \\
                 Summary / \\
                 3: Data Processing / \\
                 Data Transformation and Reduction / \\
                 Data Validation / \\
                 Bundle and Unbundle / \\
                 Multiline Records / \\
                 Summary / \\
                 4: Reports and Databases / \\
                 Generating Reports / \\
                 Packaged Queries / \\
                 A Relational Database System / \\
                 Summary / \\
                 5: Processing Words / \\
                 Random Text Generation / \\
                 Interactive Text-Manipulation / \\
                 Text Processing / \\
                 Summary / \\
                 6: Little Languages / \\
                 An Assembler and Interpreter / \\
                 A Language for Drawing Graphs / \\
                 A Sort Generator / \\
                 A Reverse-Polish Calculator / \\
                 An Infix Calculator / \\
                 Recursive-Descent Parsing / \\
                 Summary / \\
                 7: Experiments with Algorithms / \\
                 Sorting / \\
                 Profiling / \\
                 Topological Sorting / \\
                 Make: A File Updating Program / \\
                 Summary / \\
                 8: Epilog / \\
                 AWK as a Language / \\
                 Performance / \\
                 Conclusion / \\
                 Appendix A: AWK Summary / \\
                 Appendix B: Answers to Selected Exercises / \\
                 Index",
}

@Book{Aho:2007:CPT,
  editor =       "Alfred V. Aho and Monica S. Lam and Ravi Sethi and
                 Jeffrey D. Ullman",
  title =        "Compilers: Principles, Techniques, and Tools",
  publisher =    "Pearson/Addison Wesley",
  address =      "Boston, MA, USA",
  edition =      "Second",
  pages =        "xxiv + 1009",
  year =         "2007",
  ISBN =         "0-321-48681-1 (hardcover), 0-321-49169-6 (paperback)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-321-48681-3 (hardcover), 978-0-321-49169-5
                 (paperback)",
  LCCN =         "QA76.76.C65 A37 2007",
  bibdate =      "Tue Jan 30 16:21:16 MST 2007",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/unix.bib;
                 z3950.loc.gov:7090/Voyager",
  URL =          "http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0618/2006024333.html",
  abstract =     "This new edition of the classic `Dragon' book has been
                 completely revised to include the most recent
                 developments to compiling. The book provides a thorough
                 introduction to compiler design and continues to
                 emphasize the applicability of compiler technology to a
                 broad range of problems in software design and
                 development. The first half of the book is designed for
                 use in an undergraduate compilers course while the
                 second half can be used in a graduate course stressing
                 code optimization.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  remark =       "Revised edition of \cite{Aho:1986:CPC}. This is
                 commonly called the ``purple dragon'' book, after its
                 colorful cover design.",
  shorttableofcontents = "1: Introduction / 1 \\
                 2: A Simple Syntax-Directed Translator / 39 \\
                 3: Lexical Analysis / 109 \\
                 4: Syntax Analysis / 191 \\
                 5: Syntax-Directed Translation / 303 \\
                 6: Intermediate-Code Generation / 357 \\
                 7: Run-Time Environments / 427 \\
                 8: Code Generation / 505 \\
                 9: Machine-Independent Optimizations / 583 \\
                 10: Instruction-Level Parallelism / 707 \\
                 11: Optimizing for Parallelism and Locality / 769 \\
                 12: Interprocedural Analysis / 903 \\
                 A: A Complete Front End / 965 \\
                 B: Finding Linearly Independent Solutions / 989 \\
                 Index / 993",
  subject =      "Compilers (Computer programs)",
  tableofcontents = "1: Introduction / 1 \\
                 1.1 Language Processors / 1 \\
                 1.1.1 Exercises for Section 1.1 / 3 \\
                 1.2 The Structure of a Compiler / 4 \\
                 1.2.1 Lexical Analysis / 5 \\
                 1.2.2 Syntax Analysis / 8 \\
                 1.2.3 Semantic Analysis / 8 \\
                 1.2.4 Intermediate Code Generation / 9 \\
                 1.2.5 Code Optimization / 10 \\
                 1.2.6 Code Generation / 10 \\
                 1.2.7 Symbol-Table Management / 11 \\
                 1.2.8 The Grouping of Phases into Passes / 11 \\
                 1.2.9 Compiler-Construction Tools / 12 \\
                 1.3 The Evolution of Programming Languages / 12 \\
                 1.3.1 The Move to Higher-level Languages / 13 \\
                 1.3.2 Impacts on Compilers / 14 \\
                 1.3.3 Exercises for Section 1.3 / 14 \\
                 1.4 The Science of Building a Compiler / 15 \\
                 1.4.1 Modeling in Compiler Design and Implementation /
                 15 \\
                 1.4.2 The Science of Code Optimization / 15 \\
                 1.5 Applications of Compiler Technology / 17 \\
                 1.5.1 Implementation of High-Level Programming
                 Languages / 17 \\
                 1.5.2 Optimizations for Computer Architectures / 19 \\
                 1.5.3 Design of New Computer Architectures / 21 \\
                 1.5.4 Program Translations / 22 \\
                 1.5.5 Software Productivity Tools / 23 \\
                 1.6 Programming Language Basics / 25 \\
                 1.6.1 The Static/Dynamic Distinction / 25 \\
                 1.6.2 Environments and States / 26 \\
                 1.6.3 Static Scope and Block Structure / 28 \\
                 1.6.4 Explicit Access Control / 31 \\
                 1.6.5 Dynamic Scope / 31 \\
                 1.6.6 Parameter Passing Mechanisms / 33 \\
                 1.6.7 Aliasing / 35 \\
                 1.6.8 Exercises for Section 1.6 / 35 \\
                 1.7 Summary of Chapter 1 / 36 \\
                 1.8 References for Chapter 1 / 38 \\
                 2: A Simple Syntax-Directed Translator / 39 \\
                 2.1 Introduction / 40 \\
                 2.2 Syntax Definition / 42 \\
                 2.2.1 Definition of Grammars / 42 \\
                 2.2.2 Derivations / 44 \\
                 2.2.3 Parse Trees / 45 \\
                 2.2.4 Ambiguity / 47 \\
                 2.2.5 Associativity of Operators / 48 \\
                 2.2.6 Precedence of Operators / 48 \\
                 2.2.7 Exercises for Section 2.2 / 51 \\
                 2.3 Syntax-Directed Translation / 52 \\
                 2.3.1 Postfix Notation / 53 \\
                 2.3.2 Synthesized Attributes / 54 \\
                 2.3.3 Simple Syntax-Directed Definitions / 56 \\
                 2.3.4 Tree Traversals / 56 \\
                 2.3.5 Translation Schemes / 57 \\
                 2.3.6 Exercises for Section 2.3 / 60 \\
                 2.4 Parsing / 60 \\
                 2.4.1 Top-Down Parsing / 61 \\
                 2.4.2 Predictive Parsing / 64 \\
                 2.4.3 When to Use $\epsilon$-Productions / 65 \\
                 2.4.4 Designing a Predictive Parser / 66 \\
                 2.4.5 Left Recursion / 67 \\
                 2.4.6 Exercises for Section 2.4 / 68 \\
                 2.5 A Translator for Simple Expressions / 68 \\
                 2.5.1 Abstract and Concrete Syntax / 69 \\
                 2.5.2 Adapting the Translation Scheme / 70 \\
                 2.5.3 Procedures for the Nonterminals / 72 \\
                 2.5.4 Simplifying the Translator / 73 \\
                 2.5.5 The Complete Program / 74 \\
                 2.6 Lexical Analysis / 76 \\
                 2.6.1 Removal of White Space and Comments / 77 \\
                 2.6.2 Reading Ahead / 78 \\
                 2.6.3 Constants / 78 \\
                 2.6.4 Recognizing Keywords and Identifiers / 79 \\
                 2.6.5 A Lexical Analyzer / 81 \\
                 2.6.6 Exercises for Section 2.6 / 84 \\
                 2.7 Symbol Tables / 85 \\
                 2.7.1 Symbol Table Per Scope / 86 \\
                 2.7.2 The Use of Symbol Tables / 89 \\
                 2.8 Intermediate Code Generation / 91 \\
                 2.8.1 Two Kinds of Intermediate Representations / 91
                 \\
                 2.8.2 Construction of Syntax Trees / 92 \\
                 2.8.3 Static Checking / 97 \\
                 2.8.4 Three-Address Code / 99 \\
                 2.8.5 Exercises for Section 2.8 / 105 \\
                 2.9 Summary of Chapter 2 / 105 \\
                 3: Lexical Analysis / 109 \\
                 3.1 The Role of the Lexical Analyzer / 109 \\
                 3.1.1 Lexical Analysis Versus Parsing / 110 \\
                 3.1.2 Tokens, Patterns, and Lexemes / 111 \\
                 3.1.3 Attributes for Tokens / 112 \\
                 3.1.4 Lexical Errors / 113 \\
                 3.1.5 Exercises for Section 3.1 / 114 \\
                 3.2 Input Buffering / 115 \\
                 3.2.1 Buffer Pairs / 115 \\
                 3.2.2 Sentinels / 116 \\
                 3.3 Specification of Tokens / 116 \\
                 3.3.1 Strings and Languages / 117 \\
                 3.3.2 Operations on Languages / 119 \\
                 3.3.3 Regular Expressions / 120 \\
                 3.3.4 Regular Definitions / 123 \\
                 3.3.5 Extensions of Regular Expressions / 124 \\
                 3.3.6 Exercises for Section 3.3 / 125 \\
                 3.4 Recognition of Tokens / 128 \\
                 3.4.1 Transition Diagrams / 130 \\
                 3.4.2 Recognition of Reserved Words and Identifiers /
                 132 \\
                 3.4.3 Completion of the Running Example / 133 \\
                 3.4.4 Architecture of a Transition-Diagram-Based
                 Lexical Analyzer / 134 \\
                 3.4.5 Exercises for Section 3.4 / 136 \\
                 3.5 The Lexical-Analyzer Generator Lex / 140 \\
                 3.5.1 Use of Lex / 140 \\
                 3.5.2 Structure of Lex Programs / 141 \\
                 3.5.3 Conflict Resolution in Lex / 144 \\
                 3.5.4 The Lookahead Operator / 144 \\
                 3.5.5 Exercises for Section 3.5 / 146 \\
                 3.6 Finite Automata / 147 \\
                 3.6.1 Nondeterministic Finite Automata / 147 \\
                 3.6.2 Transition Tables / 148 \\
                 3.6.3 Acceptance of Input Strings by Automata / 149 \\
                 3.6.4 Deterministic Finite Automata / 149 \\
                 3.6.5 Exercises for Section 3.6 / 151 \\
                 3.7 From Regular Expressions to Automata / 152 \\
                 3.7.1 Conversion of an NFA to a DFA / 152 \\
                 3.7.2 Simulation of an NFA / 156 \\
                 3.7.3 Efficiency of NFA Simulation / 157 \\
                 3.7.4 Construction of an NFA from a Regular Expression
                 / 159 \\
                 3.7.5 Efficiency of String-Processing Algorithms / 163
                 \\
                 3.7.6 Exercises for Section 3.7 / 166 \\
                 3.8 Design of a Lexical-Analyzer Generator / 166 \\
                 3.8.1 The Structure of the Generated Analyzer / 167 \\
                 3.8.2 Pattern Matching Based on NFA's / 168 \\
                 3.8.3 DFA's for Lexical Analyzers / 170 \\
                 3.8.4 Implementing the Lookahead Operator / 171 \\
                 3.8.5 Exercises for Section 3.8 / 172 \\
                 3.9 Optimization of DFA-Based Pattern Matchers / 173
                 \\
                 3.9.1 Important States of an NFA / 173 \\
                 3.9.2 Functions Computed From the Syntax Tree / 175 \\
                 3.9.3 Computing {\em nullable}, {\em firstpos}, and
                 {\em lastpos} / 176 \\
                 3.9.4 Computing {\em followpos} / 177 \\
                 3.9.5 Converting a Regular Expression Directly to a DFA
                 / 179 \\
                 3.9.6 Minimizing the Number of States of a DFA / 180
                 \\
                 3.9.7 State Minimization in Lexical Analyzers / 184 \\
                 3.9.8 Trading Time for Space in DFA Simulation / 185
                 \\
                 3.9.9 Exercises for Section 3.9 / 186 \\
                 3.10 Summary of Chapter 3 / 187 \\
                 3.11 References for Chapter 3 / 189 \\
                 4: Syntax Analysis / 191 \\
                 4.1 Introduction / 192 \\
                 4.1.1 The Role of the Parser / 192 \\
                 4.1.2 Representative Grammars / 193 \\
                 4.1.3 Syntax Error Handling / 194 \\
                 4.1.4 Error-Recovery Strategies / 195 \\
                 4.2 Context-Free Grammars / 197 \\
                 4.2.1 The Formal Definition of a Context-Free Grammar.
                 / 197 \\
                 4.2.2 Notational Conventions / 198 \\
                 4.2.3 Derivations / 199 \\
                 4.2.4 Parse Trees and Derivations / 201 \\
                 4.2.5 Ambiguity / 203 \\
                 4.2.6 Verifying the Language Generated by a Grammar /
                 204 \\
                 4.2.7 Context-Free Grammars Versus Regular Expressions
                 / 205 \\
                 4.2.8 Exercise for Section 4.2 / 206 \\
                 4.3 Writing a Grammar / 209 \\
                 4.3.1 Lexical Versus Syntactic Analysis / 209 \\
                 4.3.2 Eliminating Ambiguity / 210 \\
                 4.3.3 Elimination of Left Recursion / 212 \\
                 4.3.4 Left Factoring / 214 \\
                 4.3.5 Non-Context-Free Language Constructs / 215 \\
                 4.3.6 Exercises for Section 4.3 / 216 \\
                 4.4 Top-Down Parsing / 217 \\
                 4.4.1 Recursive-Descent Parsing / 219 \\
                 4.4.2 FIRST and FOLLOW / 220 \\
                 4.4.3 LL(l) Grammars / 222 \\
                 4.4.4 Nonrecursive Predictive Parsing / 226 \\
                 4.4.5 Error Recovery in Predictive Parsing / 228 \\
                 4.4.6 Exercises for Section 4.4 / 231 \\
                 4.5 Bottom-Up Parsing / 233 \\
                 4.5.1 Reductions / 234 \\
                 4.5.2 Handle Pruning / 235 \\
                 4.5.3 Shift-Reduce Parsing / 236 \\
                 4.5.4 Conflicts During Shift-Reduce Parsing / 238 \\
                 4.5.5 Exercises for Section 4.5 / 240 \\
                 4.6 Introduction to LR Parsing: Simple LR / 241 \\
                 4.6.1 Why LR Parsers? / 241 \\
                 4.6.2 Items and the LR(0) Automaton / 242 \\
                 4.6.3 The LR-Parsing Algorithm / 248 \\
                 4.6.4 Constructing SLR-Parsing Tables / 252 \\
                 4.6.5 Viable Prefixes / 256 \\
                 4.6.6 Exercises for Section 4.6 / 257 \\
                 4.7 More Powerful LR Parsers / 259 \\
                 4.7.1 Canonical LR(1) Items / 260 \\
                 4.7.2 Constructing LR(1) Sets of Items / 261 \\
                 4.7.3 Canonical LR(1) Parsing Tables / 265 \\
                 4.7.4 Constructing LALR Parsing Tables / 266 \\
                 4.7.5 Efficient Construction of LALR Parsing Tables /
                 270 \\
                 4.7.6 Compaction of LR Parsing Tables / 275 \\
                 4.7.7 Exercises for Section 4.7 / 277 \\
                 4.8 Using Ambiguous Grammars / 278 \\
                 4.8.1 Precedence and Associativity to Resolve Conflicts
                 / 279 \\
                 4.8.2 The ``Dangling-Else'' Ambiguity / 281 \\
                 4.8.3 Error Recovery in LR Parsing / 283 \\
                 4.8.4 Exercises for Section 4.8 / 285 \\
                 4.9 Parser Generators / 287 \\
                 4.9.1 The Parser Generator Yacc / 287 \\
                 4.9.2 Using Yacc with Ambiguous Grammars / 291 \\
                 4.9.3 Creating Yacc Lexical Analyzers with Lex / 294
                 \\
                 4.9.4 Error Recovery in Yacc / 295 \\
                 4.9.5 Exercises for Section 4.9 / 297 \\
                 4.10 Summary of Chapter 4 / 297 \\
                 4.11 References for Chapter 4 / 300 \\
                 5: Syntax-Directed Translation / 303 \\
                 5.1 Syntax-Directed Definitions / 304 \\
                 5.1.1 Inherited and Synthesized Attributes / 304 \\
                 5.1.2 Evaluating an SDD at the Nodes of a Parse Tree /
                 306 \\
                 5.1.3 Exercises for Section 5.1 / 309 \\
                 5.2 Evaluation Orders for SDD's / 310 \\
                 5.2.1 Dependency Graphs / 310 \\
                 5.2.2 Ordering the Evaluation of Attributes / 312 \\
                 5.2.3 S-Attributed Definitions / 312 \\
                 5.2.4 L-Attributed Definitions / 313 \\
                 5.2.5 Semantic Rules with Controlled Side Effects / 314
                 \\
                 5.2.6 Exercises for Section 5.2 / 317 \\
                 5.3 Applications of Syntax-Directed Translation / 318
                 \\
                 5.3.1 Construction of Syntax Trees / 318 \\
                 5.3.2 The Structure of a Type / 321 \\
                 5.3.3 Exercises for Section 5.3 / 323 \\
                 5.4 Syntax-Directed Translation Schemes / 324 \\
                 5.4.1 Postfix Translation Schemes / 324 \\
                 5.4.2 Parser-Stack Implementation of Postfix SDT's /
                 325 \\
                 5.4.3 SDT's With Actions Inside Productions / 327 \\
                 5.4.4 Eliminating Left Recursion From SDT 's / 328 \\
                 5.4.5 SDT's for L-Attributed Definitions / 331 \\
                 5.4.6 Exercises for Section 5.4 / 336 \\
                 5.5 Implementing L-Attributed SDD's / 337 \\
                 5.5.1 Translation During Recursive-Descent Parsing /
                 338 \\
                 5.5.2 On-The-Fly Code Generation / 340 \\
                 5.5.3 L-Attributed SDD's and LL Parsing / 343 \\
                 5.5.4 Bottom-Up Parsing of L-Attributed SDD's / 348 \\
                 5.5.5 Exercises for Section 5.5 / 352 \\
                 5.6 Summary of Chapter 5 / 353 \\
                 5.7 References for Chapter 5 / 354 \\
                 6: Intermediate-Code Generation / 357 \\
                 6.1 Variants of Syntax Trees / 358 \\
                 6.1.1 Directed Acyclic Graphs for Expressions / 359 \\
                 6.1.2 The Value-Number Method for Constructing DAG's /
                 360 \\
                 6.1.3 Exercises for Section 6.1 / 362 \\
                 6.2 Three-Address Code / 363 \\
                 6.2.1 Addresses and Instructions / 364 \\
                 6.2.2 Quadruples / 366 \\
                 6.2.3 Triples / 367 \\
                 6.2.4 Static Single-Assignment Form / 369 \\
                 6.2.5 Exercises for Section 6.2 / 370 \\
                 6.3 Types and Declarations / 370 \\
                 6.3.1 Type Expressions / 371 \\
                 6.3.2 Type Equivalence / 372 \\
                 6.3.3 Declarations / 373 \\
                 6.3.4 Storage Layout for Local Names / 373 \\
                 6.3.5 Sequences of Declarations / 376 \\
                 6.3.6 Fields in Records and Classes / 376 \\
                 6.3.7 Exercises for Section 6.3 / 378 \\
                 6.4 Translation of Expressions / 378 \\
                 6.4.1 Operations Within Expressions / 378 \\
                 6.4.2 Incremental Translation / 380 \\
                 6.4.3 Addressing Array Elements / 381 \\
                 6.4.4 Translation of Array References / 383 \\
                 6.4.5 Exercises for Section 6.4 / 384 \\
                 6.5 Type Checking / 386 \\
                 6.5.1 Rules for Type Checking / 387 \\
                 6.5.2 Type Conversions / 388 \\
                 6.5.3 Overloading of Functions and Operators / 390 \\
                 6.5.4 Type Inference and Polymorphic Functions / 391
                 \\
                 6.5.5 An Algorithm for Unification / 395 \\
                 6.5.6 Exercises for Section 6.5 / 398 \\
                 6.6 Control Flow / 399 \\
                 6.6.1 Boolean Expressions / 399 \\
                 6.6.2 Short-Circuit Code / 400 \\
                 6.6.3 Flow-of-Control Statements / 401 \\
                 6.6.4 Control-Flow Translation of Boolean Expressions /
                 403 \\
                 6.6.5 A voiding Redundant Gotos / 405 \\
                 6.6.6 Boolean Values and Jumping Code / 408 \\
                 6.6.7 Exercises for Section 6.6 / 408 \\
                 6.7 Backpatching / 410 \\
                 6.7.1 One-Pass Code Generation Using Backpatching / 410
                 \\
                 6.7.2 Backpatching for Boolean Expressions / 411 \\
                 6.7.3 Flow-of-Control Statements / 413 \\
                 6.7.4 Break-, Continue-, and Goto-Statements / 416 \\
                 6.7.5 Exercises for Section 6.7 / 417 \\
                 6.8 Switch-Statements / 418 \\
                 6.8.1 Translation of Switch-Statements / 419 \\
                 6.8.2 Syntax-Directed Translation of Switch-Statements
                 / 420 \\
                 6.8.3 Exercises for Section 6.8 / 421 \\
                 6.9 Intermediate Code for Procedures / 422 \\
                 6.10 Summary of Chapter 6 / 424 \\
                 6.11 References for Chapter 6 / 425 \\
                 7: Run-Time Environments / 427 \\
                 7.1 Storage Organization / 427 \\
                 7.1.1 Static Versus Dynamic Storage Allocation / 429
                 \\
                 7.2 Stack Allocation of Space / 430 \\
                 7.2.1 Activation Trees / 430 \\
                 7.2.2 Activation Records / 433 \\
                 7.2.3 Calling Sequences / 436 \\
                 7.2.4 Variable-Length Data on the Stack / 438 \\
                 7.2.5 Exercises for Section 7.2 / 440 \\
                 7.3 Access to Nonlocal Data on the Stack / 441 \\
                 7.3.1 Data Access Without Nested Procedures / 442 \\
                 7.3.2 Issues With Nested Procedures / 442 \\
                 7.3.3 A Language With Nested Procedure Declarations /
                 443 \\
                 7.3.4 Nesting Depth / 443 \\
                 7.3.5 Access Links / 445 \\
                 7.3.6 Manipulating Access Links / 447 \\
                 7.3.7 Access Links for Procedure Parameters / 448 \\
                 7.3.8 Displays / 449 \\
                 7.3.9 Exercises for Section 7.3 / 451 \\
                 7.4 Heap Management / 452 \\
                 7.4.1 The Memory Manager / 453 \\
                 7.4.2 The Memory Hierarchy of a Computer / 454 \\
                 7.4.3 Locality in Programs / 455 \\
                 7.4.4 Reducing Fragmentation / 457 \\
                 7.4.5 Manual Deallocation Requests / 460 \\
                 7.4.6 Exercises for Section 7.4 / 463 \\
                 7.5 Introduction to Garbage Collection / 463 \\
                 7.5.1 Design Goals for Garbage Collectors / 464 \\
                 7.5.2 Reachability / 466 \\
                 7.5.3 Reference Counting Garbage Collectors / 468 \\
                 7.5.4 Exercises for Section 7.5 / 470 \\
                 7.6 Introduction to Trace-Based Collection / 470 \\
                 7.6.1 A Basic Mark-and-Sweep Collector / 471 \\
                 7.6.2 Basic Abstraction / 473 \\
                 7.6.3 Optimizing Mark-and-Sweep / 475 \\
                 7.6.4 Mark-and-Compact Garbage Collectors / 476 \\
                 7.6.5 Copying collectors / 478 \\
                 7.6.6 Comparing Costs / 482 \\
                 7.6.7 Exercises for Section 7.6 / 482 \\
                 7.7 Short-Pause Garbage Collection / 483 \\
                 7.7.1 Incremental Garbage Collection / 483 \\
                 7.7.2 Incremental Reachability Analysis / 485 \\
                 7.7.3 Partial-Collection Basics / 487 \\
                 7.7.4 Generational Garbage Collection / 488 \\
                 7.7.5 The Train Algorithm / 490 \\
                 7.7.6 Exercises for Section 7.7 / 493 \\
                 7.8 Advanced Topics in Garbage Collection / 494 \\
                 7.8.1 Parallel and Concurrent Garbage Collection / 495
                 \\
                 7.8.2 Partial Object Relocation / 497 \\
                 7.8.3 Conservative Collection for Unsafe Languages /
                 498 \\
                 7.8.4 Weak References / 498 \\
                 7.8.5 Exercises for Section 7.8 / 499 \\
                 7.9 Summary of Chapter 7 / 500 \\
                 7.10 References for Chapter 7 / 502 \\
                 8: Code Generation / 505 \\
                 8.1 Issues in the Design of a Code Generator / 506 \\
                 8.1.1 Input to the Code Generator / 507 \\
                 8.1.2 The Target Program / 507 \\
                 8.1.3 Instruction Selection / 508 \\
                 8.1.4 Register Allocation / 510 \\
                 8.1.5 Evaluation Order / 511 \\
                 8.2 The Target Language / 512 \\
                 8.2.1 A Simple Target Machine Model / 512 \\
                 8.2.2 Program and Instruction Costs / 515 \\
                 8.2.3 Exercises for Section 8.2 / 516 \\
                 8.3 Addresses in the Target Code / 518 \\
                 8.3.1 Static Allocation / 518 \\
                 8.3.2 Stack Allocation / 520 \\
                 8.3.3 Run-Time Addresses for Names / 522 \\
                 8.3.4 Exercises for Section 8.3 / 524 \\
                 8.4 Basic Blocks and Flow Graphs / 525 \\
                 8.4.1 Basic Blocks / 526 \\
                 8.4.2 Next-Use Information / 528 \\
                 8.4.3 Flow Graphs / 529 \\
                 8.4.4 Representation of Flow Graphs / 530 \\
                 8.4.5 Loops / 531 \\
                 8.4.6 Exercises for Section 8.4 / 531 \\
                 8.5 Optimization of Basic Blocks / 533 \\
                 8.5.1 The DAG Representation of Basic Blocks / 533 \\
                 8.5.2 Finding Local Common Subexpressions / 534 \\
                 8.5.3 Dead Code Elimination / 535 \\
                 8.5.4 The Use of Algebraic Identities / 536 \\
                 8.5.5 Representation of Array References / 537 \\
                 8.5.6 Pointer Assignments and Procedure Calls / 539 \\
                 8.5.7 Reassembling Basic Blocks From DAG's / 539 \\
                 8.5.8 Exercises for Section 8.5 / 541 \\
                 8.6 A Simple Code Generator / 542 \\
                 8.6.1 Register and Address Descriptors / 543 \\
                 8.6.2 The Code-Generation Algorithm / 544 \\
                 8.6.3 Design of the Function {\em getReg} / 547 \\
                 8.6.4 Exercises for Section 8.6 / 548 \\
                 8.7 Peephole Optimization / 549 \\
                 8.7.1 Eliminating Redundant Loads and Stores / 550 \\
                 8.7.2 Eliminating Unreachable Code / 550 \\
                 8.7.3 Flow-of-Control Optimizations / 551 \\
                 8.7.4 Algebraic Simplification and Reduction in
                 Strength / 552 \\
                 8.7.5 Use of Machine Idioms / 552 \\
                 8.7.6 Exercises for Section 8.7 / 553 \\
                 8.8 Register Allocation and Assignment / 553 \\
                 8.8.1 Global Register Allocation / 553 \\
                 8.8.2 Usage Counts / 554 \\
                 8.8.3 Register Assignment for Out er Loops / 556 \\
                 8.8.4 Register Allocation by Graph Coloring / 556 \\
                 8.8.5 Exercises for Section 8.8 / 557 \\
                 8.9 Instruction Selection by Tree Rewriting / 558 \\
                 8.9.1 Tree-Translation Schemes / 558 \\
                 8.9.2 Code Generation by Tiling an Input Tree / 560 \\
                 8.9.3 Pattern Matching by Parsing / 563 \\
                 8.9.4 Routines for Semantic Checking / 565 \\
                 8.9.5 General Tree Matching / 565 \\
                 8.9.6 Exercises for Section 8.9 / 567 \\
                 8.10 Optimal Code Generation for Expressions / 567 \\
                 8.10.1 Ershov Numbers / 567 \\
                 8.10.2 Generating Code From Labeled Expression Trees /
                 568 \\
                 8.10.3 Evaluating Expressions with an Insufficient
                 Supply of Registers / 570 \\
                 8.10.4 Exercises for Section 8.10 / 572 \\
                 8.11 Dynamic Programming Code-Generation / 573 \\
                 8.11.1 Contiguous Evaluation / 574 \\
                 8.11.2 The Dynamic Programming Algorithm / 575 \\
                 8.11.3 Exercises for Section 8.11 / 577 \\
                 8.12 Summary of Chapter 8 / 578 \\
                 8.13 References for Chapter 8 / 579 \\
                 9: Machine-Independent Optimizations / 583 \\
                 9.1 The Principal Sources of Optimization / 584 \\
                 9.1.1 Causes of Redundancy / 584 \\
                 9.1.2 A Running Example: Quicksort / 585 \\
                 9.1.3 Semantics-Preserving Transformations / 586 \\
                 9.1.4 Global Common Subexpressions / 588 \\
                 9.1.5 Copy Propagation / 590 \\
                 9.1.6 Dead-Code Elimination / 591 \\
                 9.1.7 Code Motion / 592 \\
                 9.1.8 Induction Variables and Reduction in Strength /
                 592 \\
                 9.1.9 Exercises for Section 9.1 / 596 \\
                 9.2 Introduction to Data-Flow Analysis / 597 \\
                 9.2.1 The Data-Flow Abstraction / 597 \\
                 9.2.2 The Data-Flow Analysis Schema / 599 \\
                 9.2.3 Data-Flow Schemas on Basic Blocks / 600 \\
                 9.2.4 Reaching Definitions / 601 \\
                 9.2.5 Live-Variable Analysis / 608 \\
                 9.2.6 Available Expressions / 610 \\
                 9.2.7 Summary / 614 \\
                 9.2.8 Exercises for Section 9.2 / 615 \\
                 9.3 Foundations of Data-Flow Analysis / 618 \\
                 9.3.1 Semilattices / 618 \\
                 9.3.2 Transfer Functions / 623 \\
                 9.3.3 The Iterative Algorithm for General Frameworks /
                 626 \\
                 9.3.4 Meaning of a Data-Flow Solution / 628 \\
                 9.3.5 Exercises for Section 9.3 / 631 \\
                 9.4 Constant Propagation / 632 \\
                 9.4.1 Data-Flow Values for the Constant-Propagation
                 Framework / 633 \\
                 9.4.2 The Meet for the Constant-Propagation Framework /
                 633 \\
                 9.4.3 Transfer Functions for the Constant-Propagation
                 Framework / 634 \\
                 9.4.4 Monotonicity of the Constant-Propagation
                 Framework / 635 \\
                 9.4.5 Nondistributivity of the Constant-Propagation
                 Framework / 635 \\
                 9.4.6 Interpretation of the Results / 637 \\
                 9.4.7 Exercises for Section 9.4 / 637 \\
                 9.5 Partial-Redundancy Elimination / 639 \\
                 9.5.1 The Sources of Redundancy / 639 \\
                 9.5.2 Can All Redundancy Be Eliminated? / 642 \\
                 9.5.3 The Lazy-Code-Motion Problem / 644 \\
                 9.5.4 Anticipation of Expressions / 645 \\
                 9.5.5 The Lazy-Code-Motion Algorithm / 646 \\
                 9.5.6 Exercises for Section 9.5 / 655 \\
                 9.6 Loops in Flow Graphs / 655 \\
                 9.6.1 Dominators / 656 \\
                 9.6.2 Depth-First Ordering / 660 \\
                 9.6.3 Edges in a Depth-First Spanning Tree / 661 \\
                 9.6.4 Back Edges and Reducibility / 662 \\
                 9.6.5 Depth of a Flow Graph / 665 \\
                 9.6.6 Natural Loops / 665 \\
                 9.6.7 Speed of Convergence of Iterative Data-Flow
                 Algorithms / 667 \\
                 9.6.8 Exercises for Section 9.6 / 669 \\
                 9.7 Region-Based Analysis / 672 \\
                 9.7.1 Regions / 672 \\
                 9.7.2 Region Hierarchies for Reducible Flow Graphs /
                 673 \\
                 9.7.3 Overview of a Region-Based Analysis / 676 \\
                 9.7.4 Necessary Assumptions About Transfer Functions /
                 678 \\
                 9.7.5 An Algorithm for Region-Based Analysis / 680 \\
                 9.7.6 Handling Nonreducible Flow Graphs / 684 \\
                 9.7.7 Exercises for Section 9.7 / 686 \\
                 9.8 Symbolic Analysis / 686 \\
                 9.8.1 Affine Expressions of Reference Variables / 687
                 \\
                 9.8.2 Data-Flow Problem Formulation / 689 \\
                 9.8.3 Region-Based Symbolic Analysis / 694 \\
                 9.8.4 Exercises for Section 9.8 / 699 \\
                 9.9 Summary of Chapter 9 / 700 \\
                 9.10 References for Chapter 9 / 703 \\
                 10: Instruction-Level Parallelism / 707 \\
                 10.1 Processor Architectures / 708 \\
                 10.1.1 Instruction Pipelines and Branch Delays / 708
                 \\
                 10.1.2 Pipelined Execution / 709 \\
                 10.1.3 Multiple Instruction Issue / 710 \\
                 10.2 Code-Scheduling Constraints / 710 \\
                 10.2.1 Data Dependence / 711 \\
                 10.2.2 Finding Dependences Among Memory Accesses / 712
                 \\
                 10.2.3 Tradeoff Between Register Usage and Parallelism.
                 / 713 \\
                 10.2.4 Phase Ordering Between Register Allocation and
                 Code Scheduling / 716 \\
                 10.2.5 Control Dependence / 716 \\
                 10.2.6 Speculative Execution Support / 717 \\
                 10.2.7 A Basic Machine Model / 719 \\
                 10.2.8 Exercises for Section 10.2 / 720 \\
                 10.3 Basic-Block Scheduling / 721 \\
                 10.3.1 Data-Dependence Graphs / 722 \\
                 10.3.2 List Scheduling of Basic Blocks / 723 \\
                 10.3.3 Prioritized Topological Orders / 725 \\
                 10.3.4 Exercises for Section 10.3 / 726 \\
                 10.4 Global Code Scheduling / 727 \\
                 10.4.1 Primitive Code Motion / 728 \\
                 10.4.2 Upward Code Motion / 730 \\
                 10.4.3 Downward Code Motion / 731 \\
                 10.4.4 Updating Data Dependences / 732 \\
                 10.4.5 Global Scheduling Algorithms / 732 \\
                 10.4.6 Advanced Code Motion Technique s / 736 \\
                 10.4.7 Interaction with Dynamic Schedulers / 737 \\
                 10.4.8 Exercises for Section 10.4 / 737 \\
                 10.5 Software Pipelining / 738 \\
                 10.5.1 Introduction / 738 \\
                 10.5.2 Software Pipelining of Loops / 740 \\
                 10.5.3 Register Allocation and Code Generation / 743
                 \\
                 10.5.4 Do-Across Loops / 743 \\
                 10.5.5 Goals and Constraints of Software Pipelining /
                 745 \\
                 10.5.6 A Software-Pipelining Algorithm / 749 \\
                 10.5.7 Scheduling Acyclic Data-Dependence Graphs / 749
                 \\
                 10.5.8 Scheduling Cyclic Dependence Graphs / 751 \\
                 10.5.9 Improvements to the Pipelining Algorithms / 758
                 \\
                 10.5.10 Modular Variable Expansion / 758 \\
                 10.5.11 Conditional Statements / 761 \\
                 10.5.12 Hardware Support for Software Pipelining / 762
                 \\
                 10.5.13 Exercises for Section 10.5 / 763 \\
                 10.6 Summary of Chapter 10 / 765 \\
                 10.7 References for Chapter 10 / 766 \\
                 11: Optimizing for Parallelism and Locality / 769 \\
                 11.1 Basic Concepts / 771 \\
                 11.1.1 Multiprocessors / 772 \\
                 11.1.2 Parallelism in Applications / 773 \\
                 11.1.3 Loop-Level Parallelism / 775 \\
                 11.1.4 Data Locality / 777 \\
                 11.1.5 Introduction to Affine Transform Theory / 778
                 \\
                 11.2 Matrix Multiply: An In-Depth Example / 782 \\
                 11.2.1 The Matrix-Multiplication Algorithm / 782 \\
                 11.2.2 Optimizations / 785 \\
                 11.2.3 Cache Interference / 788 \\
                 11.2.4 Exercises for Section 11.2 / 788 \\
                 11.3 Iteration Spaces / 788 \\
                 11.3.1 Constructing Iteration Spaces from Loop Nests /
                 788 \\
                 11.3.2 Execution Order for Loop Nests / 791 \\
                 11.3.3 Matrix Formulation of Inequalities / 791 \\
                 11.3.4 Incorporating Symbolic Constants / 793 \\
                 11.3.5 Controlling the Order of Execution / 793 \\
                 11.3.6 Changing Axes / 798 \\
                 11.3.7 Exercises for Section 11.3 / 799 \\
                 11.4 Affine Array Indexes / 801 \\
                 11.4.1 Affine Accesses / 802 \\
                 11.4.2 Affine and Nonaffine Accesses in Practice / 803
                 \\
                 11.4.3 Exercises for Section 11.4 / 804 \\
                 11.5 Data Reuse / 804 \\
                 11.5.1 Types of Reuse / 805 \\
                 11.5.2 Self Reuse / 806 \\
                 11.5.3 Self-Spatial Reuse / 809 \\
                 11.5.4 Group Reuse / 811 \\
                 11.5.5 Exercises for Section 11.5 / 814 \\
                 11.6 Array Data-Dependence Analysis / 815 \\
                 11.6.1 Definition of Data Dependence of Array Accesses
                 / 816 \\
                 11.6.2 Integer Linear Programming / 817 \\
                 11.6.3 The GCD Test / 818 \\
                 11.6.4 Heuristics for Solving Integer Linear Programs /
                 820 \\
                 11.6.5 Solving General Integer Linear Programs / 823
                 \\
                 11.6.6 Summary / 825 \\
                 11.6.7 Exercises for Section 11.6 / 826 \\
                 11.7 Finding Synchronization-Free Parallelism / 828 \\
                 11.7.1 An Introductory Example / 828 \\
                 11.7.2 Affine Space Partitions / 830 \\
                 11.7.3 Space-Partition Constraints / 831 \\
                 11.7.4 Solving Space-Partition Constraints / 835 \\
                 11.7.5 A Simple Code-Generation Algorithm / 838 \\
                 11.7.6 Eliminating Empty Iterations / 841 \\
                 11.7.7 Eliminating Tests from Innermost Loops / 844 \\
                 11.7.8 Source-Code Transforms / 846 \\
                 11.7.9 Exercises for Section 11.7 / 851 \\
                 11.8 Synchronization Between Parallel Loops / 853 \\
                 11.8.1 A Constant Number of Synchronizations / 853 \\
                 11.8.2 Program-Dependence Graphs / 854 \\
                 11.8.3 Hierarchical Time / 857 \\
                 11.8.4 The Parallelization Algorithm / 859 \\
                 11.8.5 Exercises for Section 11.8 / 860 \\
                 11.9 Pipelining / 861 \\
                 11.9.1 What is Pipelining? / 861 \\
                 11.9.2 Successive Over-Relaxation (SOR): An Example /
                 863 \\
                 11.9.3 Fully Permutable Loops / 864 \\
                 11.9.4 Pipelining Fully Permutable Loops / 864 \\
                 11.9.5 General Theory / 867 \\
                 11.9.6 Time-Partition Constraints / 868 \\
                 11.9.7 Solving Time-Partition Constraints by Farkas'
                 Lemma / 872 \\
                 11.9.8 Code Transformations / 875 \\
                 11.9.9 Parallelism With Minimum Synchronization / 880
                 \\
                 11.9.10 Exercises for Section 11.9 / 882 \\
                 11.10 Locality Optimizations / 884 \\
                 11.10.1 Temporal Locality of Computed Data / 885 \\
                 11.10.2 Array Contraction / 885 \\
                 11.10.3 Partition Interleaving / 887 \\
                 11.10.4 Putting it All Together / 890 \\
                 11.10.5 Exercises for Section 11.10 / 892 \\
                 11.11 Other Uses of Affine Transforms / 893 \\
                 11.11.1 Distributed memory machines / 894 \\
                 11.11.2 Multi-Instruction-Issue Processors / 895 \\
                 11.11.3 Vector and SIMD Instructions / 895 \\
                 11.11.4 Prefetching / 896 \\
                 11.12 Summary of Chapter 11 / 897 \\
                 11.13 References for Chapter 11 / 899 \\
                 12: Interprocedural Analysis / 903 \\
                 12.1 Basic Concepts / 904 \\
                 12.1.1 Call Graphs / 904 \\
                 12.1.2 Context Sensitivity / 906 \\
                 12.1.3 Call Strings / 908 \\
                 12.1.4 Cloning-Based Context-Sensitive Analysis / 910
                 \\
                 12.1.5 Summary-Based Context-Sensitive Analysis / 911
                 \\
                 12.1.6 Exercises for Section 12.1 / 914 \\
                 12.2 Why Interprocedural Analysis? / 916 \\
                 12.2.1 Virtual Method Invocation / 916 \\
                 12.2.2 Pointer Alias Analysis / 917 \\
                 12.2.3 Parallelization / 917 \\
                 12.2.4 Detection of Software Errors and Vulnerabilities
                 / 917 \\
                 12.2.5 SQL Injection / 918 \\
                 12.2.6 Buffer Overflow / 920 \\
                 12.3 A Logical Representation of Data Flow / 921 \\
                 12.3.1 Introduction to Datalog / 921 \\
                 12.3.2 Datalog Rules / 922 \\
                 12.3.3 Intensional and Extensional Predicates / 924 \\
                 12.3.4 Execution of Datalog Programs / 927 \\
                 12.3.5 Incremental Evaluation of Datalog Programs / 928
                 \\
                 12.3.6 Problematic Datalog Rules / 930 \\
                 12.3.7 Exercises for Section 12.3 / 932 \\
                 12.4 A Simple Pointer-Analysis Algorithm / 933 \\
                 12.4.1 Why is Pointer Analysis Difficult / 934 \\
                 12.4.2 A Model for Pointers and References / 935 \\
                 12.4.3 Flow Insensitivity / 936 \\
                 12.4.4 The Formulation in Datalog / 937 \\
                 12.4.5 Using Type Information / 938 \\
                 12.4.6 Exercises for Section 12.4 / 939 \\
                 12.5 Context-Insensitive Interprocedural Analysis / 941
                 \\
                 12.5.1 Effects of a Method Invocation / 941 \\
                 12.5.2 Call Graph Discovery in Datalog / 943 \\
                 12.5.3 Dynamic Loading and Reflection / 944 \\
                 12.5.4 Exercises for Section 12.5 / 945 \\
                 12.6 Context-Sensitive Pointer Analysis / 945 \\
                 12.6.1 Contexts and Call Strings / 946 \\
                 12.6.2 Adding Context to Datalog Rules / 949 \\
                 12.6.3 Additional Observations About Sensitivity / 949
                 \\
                 12.6.4 Exercises for Section 12.6 / 950 \\
                 12.7 Datalog Implementation by BDD's / 951 \\
                 12.7.1 Binary Decision Diagrams / 951 \\
                 12.7.2 Transformations on BDD's / 953 \\
                 12.7.3 Representing Relations by BDD's / 954 \\
                 12.7.4 Relational Operations as BDD Operations / 954
                 \\
                 12.7.5 Using BDD's for Points-to Analysis / 957 \\
                 12.7.6 Exercises for Section 12.7 / 958 \\
                 12.8 Summary of Chapter 12 / 958 \\
                 12.9 References for Chapter 12 / 961 \\
                 A: A Complete Front End / 965 \\
                 A.1 The Source Language / 965 \\
                 A.2 Main / 966 \\
                 A.3 Lexical Analyzer / 967 \\
                 A.4 Symbol Tables and Types / 970 \\
                 A.5 Intermediate Code for Expressions / 971 \\
                 A.6 Jumping Code for Boolean Expressions / 974 \\
                 A.7 Intermediate Code for Statements / 978 \\
                 A.8 Parser / 981 \\
                 A.9 Creating the Front End / 986 \\
                 B: Finding Linearly Independent Solutions / 989 \\
                 Index / 993",
}

@Article{Aiken:1946:ASC,
  author =       "H. H. Aiken and G. M. Hopper",
  title =        "The {Automatic Sequence Controlled Calculator}",
  journal =      "Electrical Engineering",
  volume =       "65",
  number =       "??",
  pages =        "384--391, 449--454, 522--528",
  year =         "1946",
  bibdate =      "Wed Oct 13 11:26:29 2010",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  note =         "Reprinted in \cite[\S 5.2]{Randell:1982:ODC}.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Article{Aiken:1964:PAC,
  author =       "H. H. Aiken",
  title =        "Proposed automatic calculating machine",
  journal =      j-IEEE-SPECTRUM,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "??",
  pages =        "62--69",
  month =        aug,
  year =         "1964",
  CODEN =        "IEESAM",
  DOI =          "https://doi.org/10.1109/MSPEC.1964.5531929",
  ISSN =         "0018-9235 (print), 1939-9340 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "0018-9235",
  bibdate =      "Wed Oct 13 11:16:56 2010",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/fparith.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  note =         "Previously unpublished memorandum. Reprinted in
                 \cite[\S 5.1]{Randell:1982:ODC}.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  remark =       "This article does not appear in the IEEE Xplore
                 database, and that source lists only volume 1, number
                 1, for 1964. I found multiple references to this paper
                 as the August 1964 issue, so perhaps IEEE Xplore is
                 missing early journal issues??",
  xxpages =      "62--68",
}

@Book{Akl:1985:PSA,
  author =       "Selim G. Akl",
  title =        "Parallel Sorting Algorithms",
  publisher =    pub-ACADEMIC,
  address =      pub-ACADEMIC:adr,
  pages =        "xiii + 229",
  year =         "1985",
  ISBN =         "0-12-047680-0",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-12-047680-0",
  LCCN =         "QA76.5 .A363 1985",
  bibdate =      "Tue Dec 14 22:36:06 1993",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Al-Khalili:2011:HWH,
  author =       "Jim Al-Khalili",
  title =        "The house of wisdom: how {Arabic} science saved
                 ancient knowledge and gave us the {Renaissance}",
  publisher =    pub-PENGUIN,
  address =      pub-PENGUIN:adr,
  pages =        "xxix + 302 + 8",
  year =         "2011",
  ISBN =         "1-59420-279-6 (hardcover)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-1-59420-279-7 (hardcover)",
  LCCN =         "Q127.A5 A4 2011",
  bibdate =      "Fri Jul 22 15:57:04 MDT 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 z3950.loc.gov:7090/Voyager",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  subject =      "science; Arab countries; history; philosophy; science,
                 medieval; methodology; intellectual life; science,
                 Renaissance",
  tableofcontents = "A dream of Aristotle \\
                 The rise of Islam \\
                 Translation \\
                 The lonely alchemist \\
                 The house of wisdom \\
                 Big science \\
                 Numbers \\
                 Algebra \\
                 The philosopher \\
                 The medic \\
                 The physicist \\
                 The prince and the pauper \\
                 Andalusia \\
                 The Mar{\aa}agha Revolution \\
                 Decline and Renaissance \\
                 Science and Islam today \\
                 Timeline: then Islamic world from antiquity to the
                 beginning of the modern period",
}

@Book{Albers:1990:MMP,
  editor =       "Donald J. Albers and Gerald L. Alexanderson and
                 Constance Reid",
  title =        "More Mathematical People: Contemporary Conversations",
  publisher =    pub-HBJ,
  address =      pub-HBJ:adr,
  pages =        "xviii + 375",
  year =         "1990",
  ISBN =         "0-15-158175-4",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-15-158175-7",
  LCCN =         "QA28 .M67 1990",
  bibdate =      "Mon Aug 10 17:01:29 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 z3950.loc.gov:7090/Voyager",
  price =        "US\$29.95",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  libnote =      "Not yet in my library.",
  subject =      "mathematicians; interviews; biography",
  tableofcontents = "Becoming a mathematician \\
                 Lipman Bers \\
                 Ralph P. Boas, Jr. \\
                 Paul J. Cohen \\
                 George B. Dantzig \\
                 Andrew M. Gleason \\
                 Bill Gosper \\
                 Irving Kaplansky \\
                 Peter D. Lax \\
                 Lucien Le Cam \\
                 Hans Lewy \\
                 Saunders Mac Lane \\
                 Cathleen S. Morawetz \\
                 Fredereck Mosteller \\
                 Julia Robinson \\
                 Mary Ellen Rudin \\
                 Steve Smale \\
                 William P. Thurston \\
                 Robin Wilson",
}

@Book{Albers:1994:MMP,
  editor =       "Donald J. Albers and Gerald L. Alexanderson and
                 Constance Reid",
  title =        "More Mathematical People: Contemporary Conversations",
  publisher =    pub-ACADEMIC,
  address =      pub-ACADEMIC:adr,
  pages =        "xviii + 375",
  year =         "1994",
  ISBN =         "0-12-048251-7",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-12-048251-1",
  LCCN =         "QA28 .M67 1994",
  bibdate =      "Mon Aug 10 17:01:29 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 z3950.loc.gov:7090/Voyager",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  libnote =      "Not yet in my library.",
  remark =       "Reprint of \cite{Albers:1990:MMP}.",
  subject =      "mathematicians; biography",
  tableofcontents = "Becoming a mathematician \\
                 Lipman Bers \\
                 Ralph P. Boas, Jr. \\
                 Paul J. Cohen \\
                 George B. Dantzig \\
                 Andrew M. Gleason \\
                 Bill Gosper \\
                 Irving Kaplansky \\
                 Peter D. Lax \\
                 Lucien Le Cam \\
                 Hans Lewy \\
                 Saunders Mac Lane \\
                 Cathleen S. Morawetz \\
                 Fredereck Mosteller \\
                 Julia Robinson \\
                 Mary Ellen Rudin \\
                 Steve Smale \\
                 William P. Thurston \\
                 Robin Wilson",
}

@Book{Albers:2008:MPP,
  editor =       "Donald J. Albers and Gerald L. Alexanderson",
  title =        "Mathematical people: profiles and interviews",
  publisher =    pub-A-K-PETERS,
  address =      pub-A-K-PETERS:adr,
  edition =      "Second",
  pages =        "xxvi + 386",
  year =         "2008",
  ISBN =         "1-56881-340-6",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-1-56881-340-0",
  LCCN =         "QA28 .M37 2008",
  bibdate =      "Mon Aug 10 17:01:29 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/bibnet/authors/m/mandelbrot-benoit.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/bibnet/authors/u/ulam-stanislaw-m.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/mathgaz2010.bib;
                 z3950.loc.gov:7090/Voyager",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  libnote =      "Not yet in my library.",
  subject =      "mathematicians; biography",
  tableofcontents = "Garrett Birkhoff / interviewed by G. L.
                 Alexanderson and Carroll Wilde \\
                 David Blackwell / interviewed by Donald J. Albers \\
                 Shiing-Shen Chern / by William Chinn and John Lewis \\
                 John H. Conway / by Richard K. Guy \\
                 H. S. M. Coxeter / interviewed by Dave Logothetti \\
                 Persi Diaconis / interviewed by Donald J. Albers \\
                 Paul Erd{\H{o}}s / interviewed by G. L. Alexanderson
                 \\
                 Martin Gardner: defending the honor of the human mind /
                 by Peter Renz \\
                 Martin Gardner: master of recreational mathematics and
                 much more / interviewed by Donald J. Albers \\
                 Ronald L. Graham / by Donald J. Albers \\
                 Paul Halmos / interviewed by Donald J. Albers \\
                 Peter J. Hilton / interviewed by Lynn A. Steen and G.
                 L. Alexanderson \\
                 John Kemeny / interviewed by Lynn A. Steen \\
                 Morris Kline / interviewed by G. L. Alexanderson \\
                 Donald Knuth / interviewed by Donald J. Albers and Lynn
                 A. Steen \\
                 Solomon Lefschetz: a reminiscence / by Albert W. Tucker
                 \\
                 Beno{\^\i}t Mandelbrot / interviewed by Anthony
                 Barcellos \\
                 Henry Pollak / interviewed by Donald J. Albers and
                 Michael J. Thibodeaux \\
                 George P{\'o}lya / interviewed by G. L. Alexanderson
                 \\
                 Mina Rees / interviewed by Rosamond Dana and Peter J.
                 Hilton \\
                 Constance Reid / interviewed by G. L. Alexanderson \\
                 Herbert Robbins / interviewed by Warren Page \\
                 Raymond Smullyan: autobiographical essay \\
                 Olga Taussky-Todd: autobiographical essay \\
                 Albert Tucker / interviewed by Stephen B. Maurer \\
                 Stanis{\l}aw M. Ulam / interviewed by Anthony
                 Barcellos",
}

@Book{Albers:2016:GHH,
  editor =       "Donald J. Albers and Gerald L. Alexanderson and
                 William Dunham",
  title =        "The {G. H. Hardy} reader",
  publisher =    pub-CAMBRIDGE,
  address =      pub-CAMBRIDGE:adr,
  pages =        "xv + 1 + 395",
  year =         "2016",
  ISBN =         "1-107-13555-9 (hardcover), 1-107-59464-2 (paperback)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-1-107-13555-0 (hardcover), 978-1-107-59464-7
                 (paperback)",
  LCCN =         "QA29.H23 G44 2015",
  bibdate =      "Thu Sep 15 07:39:02 MDT 2016",
  bibsource =    "fsz3950.oclc.org:210/WorldCat;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  series =       "Spectrum",
  abstract =     "This book is a feast of G. H. Hardy's writing. There
                 are selections of his mathematical papers, his book
                 reviews, his tributes to departed colleagues. Some
                 articles are serious, and others display his wry sense
                 of humor. To these are added recollections by those who
                 knew Hardy, along with biographical and mathematical
                 pieces written explicitly for this collection.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  libnote =      "Not yet in my library.",
  subject =      "Hardy, G. H; (Godfrey Harold); (Godfrey Harold),;
                 Mathematics; History; 19th century; 20th century;
                 Mathematics.",
  subject-dates = "1877--1947",
  tableofcontents = "I: Biography \\
                 1: Hardy's life \\
                 2: The letter from Ramanujan to Hardy, 16 January 1913
                 \\
                 3: A letter from Bertrand Russell to Lady Ottoline
                 Morrell, 2 February 1913 \\
                 4: The Indian mathematician Ramanujan \\
                 5: ``Epilogue'' from The man who knew infinity by
                 Robert Kanigel \\
                 6: Posters of ``Hardy's years at Oxford'' by R. J.
                 Wilson \\
                 7: A glimpse of J. E. Littlewood \\
                 8: A letter from Freeman Dyson to C. P. Snow, 22 May
                 1967, and two letters from Hardy to Dyson \\
                 9: Miss Gertrude Hardy \\
                 II: Writings by and about G. H. Hardy \\
                 10: Hardy on writing books \\
                 11: Selections from Hardy's writings \\
                 12: Selections from what others have said about Hardy
                 \\
                 III: Mathematics \\
                 13: An introduction to the theory of numbers \\
                 14: Prime numbers \\
                 15: The theory of numbers \\
                 16: The Riemann zeta-function and lattice point
                 problems by E. C. Titchmarsh \\
                 17: Four Hardy gems \\
                 a: A function \\
                 b: An integral \\
                 c: An inequality \\
                 d: An application \\
                 18: What is geometry? \\
                 19: The case against the mathematical tripos \\
                 20: The mathematician on cricket by C. P. Snow \\
                 21: Cricket for the rest of us by John Stillwell \\
                 22: A mathematical theorem about golf \\
                 23: Mathematics in war-time \\
                 24: Mathematics \\
                 25: Asymptotic formul{\ae} in combinatory analysis
                 (excerpts) with S. Ramanujan \\
                 26: A new solution of Waring's problem (excerpts) with
                 J. E. Littlewood \\
                 27: Some notes on certain theorems in higher
                 trigonometry \\
                 28: The integral $\int_0^\infty \frac{\sin(x)}{x} \,
                 dx$ and further remarks on the integral $\int_0^\infty
                 \frac{\sin(x)}{x} \, dx$ \\
                 IV: Tributes \\
                 29: Dr. Glaisher and the ``messenger of mathematics''
                 \\
                 30: David Hilbert \\
                 31: Edmund Landau (with H. Heilbronn) \\
                 32: G{\"o}sta Mittag-Leffler \\
                 V: Book Reviews \\
                 33: Osgood's Calculus and Johnson's Calculus \\
                 34: Hadamard: The psychology of invention in the
                 mathematical field \\
                 35: Hulburt: Differential and integral calculus \\
                 36: B{\^o}cher: An introduction to the study of
                 integral equations \\
                 37: Davison: Higher Algebra \\
                 38: Zoretti: Le{\c{c}}ons de math{\'e}matiques
                 g{\'e}n{\'e}rales \\
                 A Last Word \\
                 Sources \\
                 Acknowledgments \\
                 Index \\
                 About the Editors",
}

@Book{Alder:2002:MAT,
  author =       "Ken Alder",
  title =        "The Measure of All Things: The Seven-Year Odyssey and
                 Hidden Error That Transformed the World",
  publisher =    "Free Press",
  address =      "New York, NY, USA",
  pages =        "x + 422",
  year =         "2002",
  ISBN =         "0-7432-1675-X",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-7432-1675-3",
  LCCN =         "QB291 .A43 2002",
  bibdate =      "Fri Oct 24 15:16:47 2003",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  note =         "In June 1792, the erudite and cosmopolitan
                 Jean-Baptiste-Joseph Delambre and the cautious and
                 scrupulous Pierre-Fran{\c{c}}ois-Andre Mechain set out
                 from Paris --- one north to Dunkirk, the other south to
                 Barcelona to calculate the length of the meter. In the
                 face of death threats from village revolutionary
                 councils, superstitious peasants, and civil war, they
                 had only their wits and their letters to each other for
                 support. Their findings would be used to create what we
                 now know as the metric system. Despite their
                 painstaking and Herculean efforts, Mechain made a
                 mistake in his calculations that he covered up. The
                 guilty knowledge of his error drove him to the brink of
                 madness, and in the end, he died in an attempt to
                 correct himself. Only then was his mistake discovered.
                 Delambre decided to seal all evidence of the error in a
                 vault at the Paris Observatory. Two hundred year later,
                 historian Ken Alder discovered the truth. With
                 scintillating prose and wry wit, Alder uses these
                 previously overlooked letters, diaries, and journals to
                 bring to life a remarkable time when everything was
                 open to question and the light of reason made every
                 dream seem possible.",
  price =        "US\$27.00",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  keywords =     "Arc measures --- History; Delambre, J. B. J. (Jean
                 Baptiste Joseph), 1749--1822; Meter (Unit) --- History;
                 M{\'e}chain, Pierre, 1744--1804",
  tableofcontents = "North-going astronomer \\
                 South-going astronomer \\
                 Metric of revolution \\
                 Castle of Mont-Jouy \\
                 Calculating people \\
                 Fear of France \\
                 Convergence \\
                 Triangulation \\
                 Empire of science \\
                 Broken arc \\
                 Mechain's mistake, Delambre's peace \\
                 Metered globe \\
                 Epilogue: Shape of our world",
}

@TechReport{Aldus:tiff,
  author =       "Aldus Corporation and Microsoft Corporation",
  title =        "Tag Image File Format ({TIFF}) Specification Revision
                 5.0",
  institution =  "Aldus Corporation, 411 First Avenue South, Suite 200,
                 Seattle, WA 98104, Tel: (206) 622-5500, and Microsoft
                 Corporation, 16011 NE 36th Way, Box 97017, Redmond, WA
                 98073-9717, Tel: (206) 882-8080",
  month =        aug # " 8",
  year =         "1988",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Alexander:2010:DDH,
  author =       "Amir Alexander",
  title =        "Duel at Dawn: Heroes, Martyrs, and the Rise of Modern
                 Mathematics",
  publisher =    pub-HARVARD,
  address =      pub-HARVARD:adr,
  pages =        "307",
  year =         "2010",
  ISBN =         "0-674-04661-7",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-674-04661-0",
  LCCN =         "QA10.7 .A44 2010",
  bibdate =      "Thu Mar 14 12:05:39 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/bibnet/authors/i/infeld-leopold.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/annscience.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/bjhs2010.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/histmath.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/mathgaz2010.bib;
                 z3950.loc.gov:7090/Voyager",
  abstract =     "From Paris to St. Petersburg, Norway to Transylvania,
                 Amir Alexander introduces us to national heroes and
                 outcasts, innocents, swindlers, and martyrs --- all
                 uncommonly gifted creators of modern mathematics.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  remark =       "The book contains three index entries about Leopold
                 Infeld in reference to his book on Galois
                 \cite{Infeld:1948:WGL}.",
  subject =      "Mathematics; Social aspects; History",
  tableofcontents = "Introduction: A Showdown in Paris / 1 \\
                 I: Natural men \\
                 1: The eternal child / 19 \\
                 2: Natural mathematics / 49 \\
                 II: Heroes and martyrs \\
                 3: A habit of insult: The short and impertinent life of
                 {\'E}variste Galois / 77 \\
                 4: The exquisite dance of the blue nymphs / 301 \\
                 5: A martyr to contempt / 127 \\
                 III: Romantic mathematics \\
                 6: The poetry of mathematics / 159 \\
                 7: Purity and rigor: the birth of modern mathematics /
                 184 \\
                 IV: A new and different world \\
                 8: The gifted swordsman / 215 \\
                 Conclusion: Portrait of a mathematician / 253 \\
                 Notes / 275 \\
                 Acknowledgements / 299 \\
                 Index / 301",
}

@Book{Alexandrescu:2010:DPL,
  author =       "Andrei Alexandrescu",
  title =        "The {D} programming language",
  publisher =    pub-AW,
  address =      pub-AW:adr,
  pages =        "xxvii + 463",
  year =         "2010",
  ISBN =         "0-321-65953-8 (hardcover), 0-321-63536-1 (paperback)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-321-65953-8 (hardcover), 978-0-321-63536-5
                 (paperback)",
  LCCN =         "QA76.73.D138 A44 2010; QA76.73.D138",
  bibdate =      "Sat Aug 21 13:36:45 MDT 2010",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 library.mit.edu:9909/mit01",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  subject =      "D (Computer program language)",
  tableofcontents = "Foreword by Walter Bright \\
                 Foreword by Scott Meyers \\
                 Preface \\
                 Intended Audience \\
                 Organization of the Book \\
                 A Brief History \\
                 Acknowledgments \\
                 1 ``D''iving In \\
                 1.1 Numbers and Expressions \\
                 1.2 Statements \\
                 1.3 Function Basics \\
                 1.4 Arrays and Associative Arrays \\
                 1.4.1 Building a Vocabulary \\
                 1.4.2 Array Slicing. Type-Generic Functions. Unit Tests
                 \\
                 1.4.3 Counting Frequencies. Lambda Functions \\
                 1.5 Basic Data Structures \\
                 1.6 Interfaces and Classes \\
                 1.6.1 More Statistics. Inheritance \\
                 1.7 Values versus References \\
                 1.8 Summary \\
                 2 Basic Types. Expressions \\
                 2.1 Symbols \\
                 2.1.1 Special Symbols \\
                 2.2 Literals \\
                 2.2.1 Boolean Literals \\
                 2.2.2 Integral Literals \\
                 2.2.3 Floating-Point Literals \\
                 2.2.4 Character Literals \\
                 2.2.5 String Literals \\
                 2.2.6 Array and Associative Array Literals \\
                 2.2.7 Function Literals \\
                 2.3 Operators \\
                 2.3.1 Lvalues and Rvalues \\
                 2.3.2 Implicit Numeric Conversions \\
                 2.3.3 Typing of Numeric Operators \\
                 2.3.4 Primary Expressions \\
                 2.3.5 Postfix Expressions \\
                 2.3.6 Unary Expressions \\
                 2.3.7 The Power Expression \\
                 2.3.8 Multiplicative Expressions \\
                 2.3.9 Additive Expressions \\
                 2.3.10 Shift Expressions \\
                 2.3.11 in Expressions \\
                 2.3.12 Comparison Operators \\
                 2.3.13 Bitwise OR, XOR, AND \\
                 2.3.14 Logical AND \\
                 2.3.15 Logical OR \\
                 2.3.16 The Conditional Operator \\
                 2.3.17 Assignment Operators \\
                 2.3.18 The Comma Operator \\
                 2.4 Summary and Quick Reference \\
                 3 Statements \\
                 3.1 The Expression Statement \\
                 3.2 The Compound Statement \\
                 3.3 The if Statement \\
                 3.4 The static if Statement \\
                 3.5 The switch Statement \\
                 3.6 The final switch Statement \\
                 3.7 Looping Statements \\
                 3.7.1 The while Statement \\
                 3.7.2 The do-while Statement \\
                 3.7.3 The for Statement \\
                 3.7.4 The foreach Statement \\
                 3.7.5 Foreach on Arrays \\
                 3.7.6 The continue and break Statements \\
                 3.8 The goto Statement \\
                 3.9 The with Statement \\
                 3.10 The return Statement \\
                 3.11 The throw and try Statements \\
                 3.12 The mixin Statement \\
                 3.13 The scope Statement \\
                 3.14 The synchronized Statement \\
                 3.15 The asm Statement \\
                 3.16 Summary and Quick Reference \\
                 4 Arrays, Associative Arrays, and Strings \\
                 4.1 Dynamic Arrays \\
                 4.1.1 Length \\
                 4.1.2 Bounds Checking \\
                 4.1.3 Slicing \\
                 4.1.4 Copying \\
                 4.1.5 Comparing for Equality \\
                 4.1.6 Concatenating \\
                 4.1.7 Array-wise Expressions \\
                 4.1.8 Shrinking \\
                 4.1.9 Expanding \\
                 4.1.10 Assigning to length \\
                 4.2 Fixed-Size Arrays \\
                 4.2.1 Length \\
                 4.2.2 Bounds Checking \\
                 4.2.3 Slicing \\
                 4.2.4 Copying and Implicit Conversion \\
                 4.2.5 Comparing for Equality \\
                 4.2.6 Concatenating \\
                 4.2.7 Array-wise Operations \\
                 4.3 Multidimensional Arrays \\
                 4.4 Associative Arrays \\
                 4.4.1 Length \\
                 4.4.2 Reading and Writing Slots \\
                 4.4.3 Copying \\
                 4.4.4 Comparing for Equality \\
                 4.4.5 Removing Elements \\
                 4.4.6 Iterating \\
                 4.4.7 User-Defined Types as Keys \\
                 4.5 Strings \\
                 4.5.1 Code Points \\
                 4.5.2 Encodings \\
                 4.5.3 Character Types \\
                 4.5.4 Arrays of Characters + Benefits = Strings \\
                 4.6 Arrays' Maverick Cousin: The Pointer \\
                 4.7 Summary and Quick Reference \\
                 [Chapter 5--13, Bibliography, and Index: no data
                 available]",
}

@Book{Allen:1978:AL,
  author =       "John R. Allen",
  title =        "Anatomy of {LISP}",
  publisher =    pub-MCGRAW-HILL,
  address =      pub-MCGRAW-HILL:adr,
  pages =        "xviii + 446",
  year =         "1978",
  ISBN =         "0-07-001115-X",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-07-001115-1",
  LCCN =         "QA76.73 .L23 A43 1978",
  bibdate =      "Tue Dec 14 22:36:12 1993",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Allen:2001:OCM,
  author =       "Randy Allen and Ken Kennedy",
  title =        "Optimizing Compilers for Modern Architectures: a
                 Dependence-based Approach",
  publisher =    pub-MORGAN-KAUFMANN,
  address =      pub-MORGAN-KAUFMANN:adr,
  pages =        "xxv + 790",
  year =         "2001",
  ISBN =         "1-55860-286-0, 0-585-45699-2 (e-book)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-1-55860-286-1, 978-0-585-45699-7 (e-book)",
  LCCN =         "QA76.76.C65 A45 2001",
  bibdate =      "Thu Jan 31 05:26:44 2002",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  URL =          "http://www.loc.gov/catdir/description/els031/2001092381.html;
                 http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/els031/2001092381.html",
  abstract =     "Modern computer architectures designed with
                 high-performance microprocessors offer tremendous
                 potential gains in performance over previous designs.
                 Yet their very complexity makes it increasingly
                 difficult to produce efficient code and to realize
                 their full potential. This landmark text from two
                 leaders in the field focuses on the pivotal role that
                 compilers can play in addressing this critical issue.
                 The basis for all the methods presented in this book is
                 data dependence, a fundamental compiler analysis tool
                 for optimizing programs on high-performance
                 microprocessors and parallel architectures. It enables
                 compiler designers to write compilers that
                 automatically transform simple, sequential programs
                 into forms that can exploit special features of these
                 modern architectures. The text provides a broad
                 introduction to data dependence, to the many
                 transformation strategies it supports, and to its
                 applications to important optimization problems such as
                 parallelization, compiler memory hierarchy management,
                 and instruction scheduling. The authors demonstrate the
                 importance and wide applicability of dependence-based
                 compiler optimizations and give the compiler writer the
                 basics needed to understand and implement them. They
                 also offer cookbook explanations for transforming
                 applications by hand to computational scientists and
                 engineers who are driven to obtain the best possible
                 performance of their complex applications. The
                 approaches presented are based on research conducted
                 over the past two decades, emphasizing the strategies
                 implemented in research prototypes at Rice University
                 and in several associated commercial systems. Randy
                 Allen and Ken Kennedy have provided an indispensable
                 resource for researchers, practicing professionals, and
                 graduate students engaged in designing and optimizing
                 compilers for modern computer architectures. This text:
                 offers a guide to the simple, practical algorithms and
                 approaches that are most effective in real-world,
                 high-performance microprocessor and parallel systems;
                 demonstrates each transformation in worked examples;
                 examines how two case study compilers implement the
                 theories and practices described in each chapter;
                 presents the most complete treatment of memory
                 hierarchy issues of any compiler text; illustrates
                 ordering relationships with dependence graphs
                 throughout the book; applies the techniques to a
                 variety of languages, including Fortran 77, C, hardware
                 definition languages, Fortran 90, and High Performance
                 Fortran; and provides extensive references to the most
                 sophisticated algorithms known in research.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  libnote =      "Not yet in my library.",
  subject =      "Optimizing compilers; Computer architecture",
  tableofcontents = "Preface \\
                 1: Compiler challenges for high-performance
                 architectures \\
                 2: Dependence \\
                 3: Dependence testing \\
                 4: Preliminary transformations \\
                 5: Enhancing fine-grained parallelism \\
                 6: Creating coarse-grained parallelism \\
                 7: Handling control flow \\
                 8: Improving register usage \\
                 9: Managing cache \\
                 10: Scheduling \\
                 11: Interprocedural analysis and optimization \\
                 12: Dependence in C and hardware design \\
                 13: Compiling array assignments \\
                 14: Compiling High Performance Fortran \\
                 Appendix: Fundamentals of Fortran 90 \\
                 References \\
                 Index",
}

@TechReport{Almgren:2000:HWC,
  author =       "Fredrik Almgren and Gunnar Andersson and Torbj{\"o}rn
                 Granlund and Lars Ivansson and Staffan Ulfberg",
  title =        "How We Cracked the {Code Book} Ciphers",
  type =         "Technical report",
  institution =  "????",
  address =      "????",
  pages =        "40",
  day =          "11",
  month =        oct,
  year =         "2000",
  bibdate =      "Thu Jan 17 10:51:00 2002",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/adabooks.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/cryptography1990.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  note =         "See \cite{Singh:1999:CBE}.",
  URL =          "http://frode.home.cern.ch/frode/crypto/codebook_solution.pdf;
                 http://www.simonsingh.com/cipher.htm",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Alred:2006:HTW,
  author =       "Gerald J. Alred and Charles T. Brusaw and Walter E.
                 Oliu",
  title =        "Handbook of Technical Writing",
  publisher =    "Bedford\slash St. Martins",
  address =      "Boston, MA, USA",
  edition =      "Eighth",
  pages =        "xxiv + 636",
  year =         "2006",
  ISBN =         "0-312-43613-0 (paperback), 0-312-35267-0 (hardcover)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-312-43613-1 (paperback), 978-0-312-35267-7
                 (hardcover)",
  LCCN =         "T11 .B78 2006",
  bibdate =      "Mon Apr 14 18:09:54 MDT 2008",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 z3950.loc.gov:7090/Voyager",
  URL =          "http://www.loc.gov/catdir/enhancements/fy0708/2005921350-b.html;
                 http://www.loc.gov/catdir/enhancements/fy0708/2005921350-d.html",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  subject =      "Technical writing; Handbooks, manuals, etc",
  tableofcontents = "Model documents and figures by topic \\
                 Five steps to successful writing \\
                 Checklist of the writing process \\
                 Handbook of technical writing: alphabetical entries /
                 1--585 \\
                 Commonly misused words and phrases \\
                 Contents by topic",
}

@Article{Alt:1948:BTLa,
  author =       "Franz L. Alt",
  title =        "A {Bell Telephone Laboratories}' Computing
                 Machine---{I}",
  journal =      j-MATH-TABLES-OTHER-AIDS-COMPUT,
  volume =       "3",
  number =       "21",
  pages =        "1--13",
  month =        jan,
  year =         "1948",
  CODEN =        "MTTCAS",
  ISSN =         "0891-6837",
  bibdate =      "Tue Oct 13 08:44:19 MDT 1998",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib; JSTOR
                 database",
  note =         "Reprinted in \cite[\S 6.4]{Randell:1982:ODC}.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Altland:2019:MPI,
  author =       "Alexander Altland and Jan von Delft",
  title =        "Mathematics for Physicists: Introductory Concepts and
                 Methods",
  publisher =    pub-CAMBRIDGE,
  address =      pub-CAMBRIDGE:adr,
  pages =        "xxi + 700",
  year =         "2019",
  ISBN =         "1-108-47122-6 (hardcover)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-1-108-47122-0 (hardcover)",
  LCCN =         "QC20 .A4345 2019",
  bibdate =      "Thu Mar 7 16:33:21 MST 2019",
  bibsource =    "fsz3950.oclc.org:210/WorldCat
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  libnote =      "Not in my library.",
  subject =      "Mathematical physics; Physics; Mathematische Physik",
  tableofcontents = "Preface \\
                 Part I. Linear Algebra: \\
                 1. Mathematics before numbers \\
                 2. Vector spaces \\
                 3. Euclidean geometry \\
                 4. Vector product \\
                 5. Linear maps \\
                 6. Determinants \\
                 7. Matrix diagonalization \\
                 8. Unitarity and hermiticity \\
                 9. Linear algebra in function spaces \\
                 10. Multilinear algebra \\
                 Problems: linear algebra \\
                 Part II. Calculus: \\
                 1. Differentiation of one-dimensional functions \\
                 2. Integration of one-dimensional functions \\
                 3. Partial differentiation \\
                 4. Multi-dimensional integration \\
                 5. Taylor series \\
                 6. Fourier calculus \\
                 7. Differential equations \\
                 8. Functional calculus \\
                 9. Calculus of complex functions \\
                 Problems: calculus \\
                 Part III. Vector Calculus: \\
                 1. Curves \\
                 2. Curvilinear coordinates \\
                 3. Fields \\
                 4. Introductory concepts of differential geometry \\
                 5. Alternating differential forms \\
                 6. Riemannian differential geometry \\
                 7. Case study: differential forms and electrodynamics
                 \\
                 Problems: vector calculus \\
                 Solutions: linear algebra \\
                 Solutions: calculus \\
                 Solutions: vector calculus \\
                 Index",
}

@Book{Alvarez:1997:RCD,
  author =       "Walter Alvarez",
  title =        "{T. rex} and the crater of doom",
  publisher =    pub-PRINCETON,
  address =      pub-PRINCETON:adr,
  pages =        "xxii + 185",
  year =         "1997",
  ISBN =         "0-691-13103-1",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-691-13103-0",
  LCCN =         "QE721.2.E97 ALV 1997",
  bibdate =      "Thu Apr 15 06:40:35 MDT 2010",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 library.ox.ac.uk:210/ADVANCE",
  URL =          "http://www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt28553d",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  remark =       "Third printing and first paperback printing (2008).",
  subject =      "Tyrannosaurus rex; catastrophes (geology); extinction
                 (biology); cryptoexplosion structures; Mexico;
                 Campeche, Bay of, region; Chicxulub Crater",
  tableofcontents = "Foreword / ix \\
                 Preface / xix \\
                 1: Armageddon / 3 \\
                 2: Ex Libro Lapidum Historia Mundi / 19 \\
                 3: Gradualist versus Catastrophist / 43 \\
                 4: Iridium / 59 \\
                 5: The Search for the Impact Site / 82 \\
                 6: The Crater of Doom / 106 \\
                 7: The World after Chicxulub / 130 \\
                 Notes / 147 \\
                 Index / 171",
}

@Book{Ament:2001:INB,
  author =       "Kurt Ament",
  title =        "Indexing: a Nuts-and-bolts Guide for Technical
                 Writers",
  publisher =    "William Andrew Publishing",
  address =      "Norwich, NY, USA",
  pages =        "x + 97",
  year =         "2001",
  ISBN =         "0-8155-1481-6",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-8155-1481-7",
  LCCN =         "T10.8 .A44 2001",
  bibdate =      "Fri Jun 17 06:26:43 MDT 2005",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/texbook3.bib;
                 z3950.loc.gov:7090/Voyager",
  URL =          "ftp://uiarchive.cso.uiuc.edu/pub/etext/gutenberg/;
                 http://www.loc.gov/catdir/description/wap041/2001033646.html;
                 http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/wap041/2001033646.html;
                 http://www.williamandrew.com/books.asp?id=1481",
  abstract =     "\booktitle{Indexing: A Practical Guide for Technical
                 Writers} is a nuts-and-bolts guide to indexing. It
                 explains in plain language and by example exactly how
                 to index any type of print or online publication
                 quickly, easily, and effectively. The sequential
                 indexing method presented in the book has been
                 battle-tested in high pressure publishing organizations
                 in a variety of high-tech industries over the space of
                 a decade. Because it is based on real-world success,
                 this indexing method is bulletproof. Users of this
                 guide will succeed as an indexer. Unlike other books on
                 the subject, this book is focused on readers, not the
                 subject itself. The book speaks directly to highly
                 practical and often anti-academic technical writers who
                 demand usability, reusability, and reliability. It is
                 geared to people with ``Keep It Simple, Stupid'' signs
                 on their cubicle walls. Proven end-user documentation
                 techniques are employed to present proven indexing
                 methods to readers who themselves develop end-user
                 documentation for a living. They have zero tolerance
                 for academic white papers on indexing. So, the book
                 delivers the hard facts.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  idnumber =     "502",
  keywords =     "Technology --- Abstracting and indexing, Science ---
                 Abstracting and indexing",
  remark =       "",
  subject =      "Technology; Abstracting and indexing; Science;
                 Abstracting and indexing",
  tableofcontents = "1: About indexing \\
                 Anyone can index \\
                 Sequential indexing \\
                 Usable indexes increase profits \\
                 2: Start indexing. Step 1 \\
                 Index chapters. Step 2 \\
                 Index procedures. Step 3 \\
                 Index topics. Step 4 \\
                 Index product names. Step 5 \\
                 Index product components. Step 6 \\
                 Index front and back matter. Step 7 \\
                 Edit your index. Step 8 \\
                 Create ``see'' references. Step 9 \\
                 Create ``see also'' references. Step 10 \\
                 Test your index \\
                 3: Indexing guidelines \\
                 Abbreviations \\
                 Acronyms \\
                 Articles \\
                 Back matter \\
                 Capitalization \\
                 Cross-references \\
                 Front matter \\
                 Interface components \\
                 Keyboard shortcuts \\
                 Master indexing \\
                 Nesting \\
                 Page ranges \\
                 Prepositions \\
                 Procedures \\
                 Product names \\
                 Scheduling \\
                 ``See'' references \\
                 ``See also'' references \\
                 Sorting \\
                 System messages",
}

@Book{Ames:1993:BPO,
  author =       "Patrick Ames",
  title =        "Beyond Paper: The Official Guide to {Adobe Acrobat}",
  publisher =    pub-ADOBE-PRESS,
  address =      pub-ADOBE-PRESS:adr,
  pages =        "127",
  year =         "1993",
  ISBN =         "1-56830-050-6",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-1-56830-050-4",
  LCCN =         "TK5105.9 .A48 1993",
  bibdate =      "Thu Jul 7 07:43:49 1994",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  price =        "US\$16.95",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Anderson:1992:LUG,
  author =       "E. Anderson and Z. Bai and C. Bischof and J. Demmel
                 and J. Dongarra and J. {Du Croz} and A. Greenbaum and
                 S. Hammarling and A. McKenney and S. Ostrouchov and D.
                 Sorensen",
  title =        "{LAPACK} Users' Guide",
  publisher =    pub-SIAM,
  address =      pub-SIAM:adr,
  pages =        "xv + 235",
  year =         "1992",
  ISBN =         "0-89871-294-7",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-89871-294-0",
  LCCN =         "QA76.73.F25 L36 1992",
  bibdate =      "Tue Dec 14 22:36:17 1993",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/bibnet/authors/d/dongarra-jack-j.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/texbook2.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  tableofcontents = "Part 1: Guide / 1 \\
                 1: Essentials / 3 \\
                 2: Contents of LAPACK / 7 \\
                 3: Performance of LAPACK / 34 \\
                 4: Accuracy and Stability / 44 \\
                 5: Documentation and Software Conventions / 61 \\
                 6: Installing LAPACK Routines / 71 \\
                 7: Troubleshooting / 75 \\
                 A: Index of Driver and Computational Routines / 79 \\
                 B: Index of Auxiliary Routines / 89 \\
                 C: Quick Reference Guide to the BLAS / 96 \\
                 D: Converting from LINPACK or EISPACK / 101 \\
                 E: LAPACK Working Notes / 109 \\
                 Bibliography / 112 \\
                 Index / 116 \\
                 Part 2: Specifications of Routines / 119",
}

@Book{Anderson:1995:LUG,
  author =       "E. Anderson and Z. Bai and C. Bischof and J. Demmel
                 and J. Dongarra and J. {Du Croz} and A. Greenbaum and
                 S. Hammarling and A. McKenney and S. Ostrouchov and D.
                 Sorensen",
  title =        "{LAPACK} Users' Guide",
  publisher =    pub-SIAM,
  address =      pub-SIAM:adr,
  edition =      "Second",
  pages =        "xix + 325",
  year =         "1995",
  ISBN =         "0-89871-345-5 (paperback)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-89871-345-9 (paperback)",
  LCCN =         "QA76.73.F25 L36 1995",
  bibdate =      "Sat Dec 06 17:25:09 2003",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/bibnet/authors/d/dongarra-jack-j.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/bibnet/subjects/acc-stab-num-alg.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/fortran3.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/gnu.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  keywords =     "algebras, linear -- data processing; Fortran (computer
                 program language); LAPACK; subroutines (computer
                 programs)",
}

@Book{Anderson:1999:LUG,
  author =       "E. Anderson and Z. Bai and C. Bischof and S. Blackford
                 and J. Demmel and J. Dongarra and J. Du Croz and A.
                 Greenbaum and S. Hammarling and A. McKenney and D.
                 Sorensen",
  title =        "{LAPACK} Users' Guide",
  publisher =    pub-SIAM,
  address =      pub-SIAM:adr,
  edition =      "Third",
  pages =        "xxi + 407",
  year =         "1999",
  ISBN =         "0-89871-447-8",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-89871-447-0",
  LCCN =         "QA76.73.F25 L36 1999",
  bibdate =      "Thu Sep 19 07:23:11 2002",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Andrews:1963:ESM,
  author =       "Frank C. Andrews",
  title =        "Equilibrium Statistical Mechanics",
  publisher =    pub-WILEY,
  address =      pub-WILEY:adr,
  pages =        "xi + 206",
  year =         "1963",
  LCCN =         "QC174.8.Z534",
  bibdate =      "Sat Jul 25 13:55:27 1998",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  xxISBN =       "none",
}

@Book{Andrews:1999:SF,
  author =       "George E. Andrews and Richard Askey and Ranjan Roy",
  title =        "Special Functions",
  volume =       "71",
  publisher =    pub-CAMBRIDGE,
  address =      pub-CAMBRIDGE:adr,
  pages =        "xvi + 664",
  year =         "1999",
  ISBN =         "0-521-62321-9 (hardcover), 0-521-78988-5 (paperback)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-521-62321-6 (hardcover), 978-0-521-78988-2
                 (paperback)",
  LCCN =         "QA351 .A74 1999",
  bibdate =      "Mon Sep 17 18:52:30 2001",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  price =        "US\$90.00 (hardcover), US\$34.95 (paperback)",
  series =       "Encyclopedia of mathematics and its applications",
  abstract =     "This treatise presents an overview of special
                 functions, focusing primarily on hypergeometric
                 functions and the associated hypergeometric series,
                 including Bessel functions and classical orthogonal
                 polynomials. The basic building block of the functions
                 studied in this book is the gamma function. In addition
                 to relatively new work on gamma and beta functions,
                 such as Selberg's multidimensional integrals, a number
                 of important but relatively unknown nineteenth century
                 results are included. The authors provide organizing
                 ideas, motivation, and historical background for the
                 study and application of some important special
                 functions. This work can serve as a learning tool and
                 lasting reference for students and researchers in
                 special functions, mathematical physics, differential
                 equations, mathematical computing, number theory, and
                 combinatorics.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  libnote =      "Not yet in my library.",
  tableofcontents = "1: The Gamma and Beta Functions \\
                 2: The Hypergeometric Functions \\
                 3: Hypergeometric Transformations and Identities \\
                 4: Bessel Functions and Confluent Hypergeometric
                 Functions \\
                 5: Orthogonal Polynomials \\
                 6: Special Orthogonal Polynomials \\
                 7: Topics in Orthogonal Polynomials \\
                 8: The Selberg Integral and Its Applications \\
                 9: Spherical Harmonics \\
                 10: Introduction to $q$-series \\
                 11: Partitions \\
                 12: Bailey Chains \\
                 A: Infinite Products \\
                 B: Summability and Fractional Integration \\
                 C: Asymptotic Expansions \\
                 D: Euler--Maclaurin Summation Formula \\
                 E: Lagrange Inversion Formula \\
                 F: Series Solutions of Differential Equations",
}

@Book{Angell:1981:PIC,
  author =       "Ian O. Angell",
  title =        "A Practical Introduction to Computer Graphics",
  publisher =    pub-WILEY,
  address =      pub-WILEY:adr,
  pages =        "viii + 146",
  year =         "1981",
  ISBN =         "0-470-27251-1",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-470-27251-0",
  LCCN =         "T385 .A53 1981",
  bibdate =      "Tue Dec 14 22:39:01 1993",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Anklam:1982:ECV,
  author =       "Patricia Anklam and David Cutler and Roger {Heinen,
                 Jr.} and M. Donald MacLaren",
  title =        "Engineering a Compiler: {VAX-11} Code Generation and
                 Optimization",
  publisher =    pub-DP,
  address =      pub-DP:adr,
  pages =        "xv + 269",
  year =         "1982",
  ISBN =         "0-932376-19-3",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-932376-19-0",
  LCCN =         "QA76.8.V37 E53 1982",
  bibdate =      "Sun Jul 10 01:07:03 1994",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  tableofcontents = "Where We Began, and Why / 1 \\
                 Background / 1 \\
                 Building the PL/1 Team / 2 \\
                 The Original Compiler / 2 \\
                 Armed for the Dragon / 3 \\
                 Getting Started: Design Decisions / 5 \\
                 A Code Generation Method / 5 \\
                 Bootstrapping / 6 \\
                 A Project Plan / 10 \\
                 Tools We Needed / 11 \\
                 How We Changed the Compiler / 12 \\
                 Introducing The VAX-11 Compiler and Common Code
                 Generator / 12 \\
                 The TBL (Table-Building Language) / 18 \\
                 How TBL Programs Are Constructed / 18 \\
                 The ``Language'' / 20 \\
                 Sample TBL Program and Its Interpreter / 24 \\
                 What the Front End Must Do / 35 \\
                 Parsing and Semantic Analysis / 36 \\
                 The Symbol Table / 37 \\
                 Trees / 45 \\
                 Block Activations and Stack Management / 47 \\
                 The Intermediate Language / 52 \\
                 Design Considerations / 52 \\
                 Summary of Operators / 54 \\
                 Data Types of Operators / 57 \\
                 References to Data / 59 \\
                 Computation of Offsets and Extents / 64 \\
                 Procedure Calls / 66 \\
                 Writing and Reducing Trees / 70 \\
                 The Evolution of Write Tree / 70 \\
                 Overview of Functions / 72 \\
                 Reduction of Integer Expressions / 76 \\
                 When a Tree Is Not a Tree / 80 \\
                 Global Optimization / 86 \\
                 Background: Engineering an Optimizer / 86 \\
                 Underlying Concepts and Assumptions / 88 \\
                 Structure and Control Flow in the Optimizer / 96 \\
                 Selecting Variables for Assignment to Registers / 99
                 \\
                 Optimizing Boolean Branch Expressions / 100 \\
                 Constructing the Flow Graph / 105 \\
                 Live Variable Analysis / 111 \\
                 Value Propagation and Register Assignment / 113 \\
                 Loop Invariant Removal / 125 \\
                 Common Subexpression Elimination / 134 \\
                 Result Incorporation / 145 \\
                 Conclusions / 146 \\
                 Operator Transformation and Code Generation / 152 \\
                 Background / 152 \\
                 Overview / 153 \\
                 Temporaries / 156 \\
                 Building Code Blocks / 159 \\
                 The Register Allocator / 169 \\
                 Background / 169 \\
                 Overview / 172 \\
                 Register Assignment / 175 \\
                 Updating Operand Specifiers in Code Blocks / 187 \\
                 Effects of Register Allocation on a Sample Program /
                 191 \\
                 Conclusions / 194 \\
                 Peephole Optimization / 196 \\
                 Objectives / 196 \\
                 Design / 197 \\
                 Scanning the Intermediate Code List / 198 \\
                 Some Peepholes / 199 \\
                 Conclusions / 202 \\
                 Beauty and the Beast / 204 \\
                 Background / 204 \\
                 The Beast / 205 \\
                 The Beauty / 213 \\
                 What Is the Moral? / 217 \\
                 Concluding Remarks / 219 \\
                 Appendix: Optimized Code Examples / 223 \\
                 Glossary / 239 \\
                 Index / 253",
}

@Book{Anlauff:2002:MBP,
  author =       "Heidi Anlauff and Axel B{\"o}ttcher and Martin
                 Ruckert",
  title =        "{Das MMIX-Buch: ein praxisnaher Zugang zur
                 Informatik}. ({German}) [{The MMIX Book}: a practical
                 introduction to computer science]",
  publisher =    pub-SV,
  address =      pub-SV:adr,
  pages =        "xiv + 327",
  year =         "2002",
  DOI =          "https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-56233-4",
  ISBN =         "3-540-42408-3 (paperback), 3-642-56233-7",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-3-540-42408-6 (paperback), 978-3-642-56233-4",
  LCCN =         "QA76.8.M6 A55 2002",
  bibdate =      "Thu Apr 26 06:59:30 MDT 2007",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 z3950.gbv.de:20011/gvk",
  price =        "EUR 24.95",
  series =       "Springer-Lehrbuch",
  URL =          "http://www.informatik.fh-muenchen.de/~mmix/MMIXBuch/",
  abstract =     "Das vorliegende Buch gibt eine praxisnahe
                 Einf{\"u}hrung in die Informatik. Zun{\"a}chst werden
                 die Grundlagen der Kodierung und der
                 Informationsdarstellung abgehandelt und fundamentale
                 Kontroll- und Datenstrukturen vorgestellt.
                 Anschlie{\ss}end werden Architekturmerkmale von
                 Prozessoren (RISC und CISC) sowie Mechanismen der
                 Systemsteuerung wie Pipelining und Interrupts
                 erl{\"a}utert. Zum Abschlu{\ss} erfolgt eine kompakte
                 Beschreibung der wichtigsten Funktionen eines
                 Betriebssystems wie die Organisation von Prozessen und
                 die Speicherverwaltung. Die Darstellung all dieser
                 Konzepte wird dabei anhand des Modellprozessors MMIX
                 gezeigt, der von Donald E. Knuth (Stanford University)
                 in seinem weltweit anerkannten Standardwerk ``The Art
                 of Computer Programming'' entwickelt wurde. Die
                 Funktionsweise dieses Prozessors wird in einem eigenen
                 Kapitel ausf{\"u}hrlich beschrieben. Weiterhin werden
                 die Programmierumgebung des MMIX und seine
                 Assemblersprache MMIXAL in erg{\"a}nzenden Anh{\"a}ngen
                 des Grundtextes zusammengestellt. Dieses Lehrbuch
                 eignet sich hervorragend zum Selbststudium. Neben der
                 Vermittlung von Grundlagenwissen steht insbesondere die
                 Wechselwirkung von Programmierung und Rechneraufbau im
                 Vordergrund.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  language =     "German",
  libnote =      "Not yet in my library.",
  subject =      "MMIX; Programmierung; Befehl <Informatik>",
  tableofcontents = "1. Einf{\"u}hrung \\
                 1.1 Computer \\
                 1.2 Die Hardware-Software-Schnittstelle \\
                 1.3 Das klassische Computermodell \\
                 1.4 Warum MMIX? \\
                 2. Darstellung von Information \\
                 Codierung und Zahlensysteme \\
                 2.1 Information, Daten und Nachricht \\
                 2.2 Codierung \\
                 2.3 Zahlensysteme \\
                 2.4 Negative Zahlen \\
                 2.5 Byte als Ma{\ss} f{\"u}r die Speicherkapazit{\"a}t
                 \\
                 3. Einf{\"u}hrung in MMIX \\
                 3.1 Der MMIX-Prozessor \\
                 3.2 Speicherzugriff \\
                 3.3 Arithmetik mit MMIX \\
                 3.4 Einfache Ein- und Ausgabe \\
                 3.5 Symbole zur Erh{\"o}hung der Lesbarkeit eines
                 Programms \\
                 4. Sprungbefehle und Kontrollstrukturen \\
                 4.1 Unbedingte Spr{\"u}nge \\
                 4.2 Bedingte Verzweigungen \\
                 4.3 Kontrollstrukturen \\
                 4.4 Bedingte Zuweisungen \\
                 5. Unterprogramme \\
                 5.1 Einf{\"u}hrung \\
                 5.2 Unterprogrammaufrufe mit GO \\
                 5.3 Der Stack \\
                 5.4 Exkurs: Pr{\"a}fix und lokale Symbole \\
                 5.5 Der Registerstack \\
                 6. Datenstrukturen \\
                 6.1 Bit \\
                 6.2 Adressen und Zeiger \\
                 6.3 Gleitkommazahlen \\
                 6.4 Zusammengesetzte Datentypen \\
                 6.5 Abstrakte Datentypen \\
                 6.6 Anwendung: Bitmap-Grafiken erzeugen und bearbeiten
                 \\
                 7. Ablaufsteuerung \\
                 7.1 Steuerwerk und Befehlszyklus \\
                 7.2 Adressierungsarten \\
                 7.3 RISC und CISC \\
                 7.4 Pipelining \\
                 7.5 Interrupts \\
                 8. Betriebssystem \\
                 8.1 Speicherverwaltung \\
                 8.2 Betriebssystemaufrufe \\
                 8.3 Prozesse \\
                 A. Liste der Befehle \\
                 B. Liste der Programme \\
                 c. Programmieren mit MMIX \\
                 C.1 Die Programmierumgebung zum Laufen bringen \\
                 C.1.1 Die ausf{\"u}hrbaren Dateien herunterladen \\
                 C.1.2 Die Programmierumgebung selbst {\"u}bersetzen \\
                 C.2 Versuche \\
                 D. Meldungen von mmixal und mmix \\
                 D.1 Warnungen von mmixal \\
                 D.2 Fehlermeldungen von mmixal \\
                 D.3 Meldungen von mmix \\
                 E. Zusammenfassung der Assemblersprache MMIXAL \\
                 E.1 Einfache Elemente \\
                 E.2 Ausdr{\"u}cke \\
                 E.3 Instruktionen \\
                 F. L{\"o}sung ausgew{\"a}hlter {\"U}bungsaufgaben",
}

@Book{Anonymous:1976:RAB,
  author =       "Anonymous",
  title =        "Road atlas {Britain}",
  publisher =    "John Bartholomew \& Son",
  address =      "Edinburgh, Scotland",
  pages =        "120",
  year =         "1976",
  ISBN =         "0-85152-505-9",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-85152-505-1",
  LCCN =         "G1811.P2 B350 1975",
  bibdate =      "Sat Dec 24 15:53:15 MST 2005",
  bibsource =    "BIBSYS [NO];
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  bookformat =   "Hardcover",
  dateentered =  "2005-12-23",
  idnumber =     "546",
}

@Book{Anonymous:1990:ASM,
  author =       "Anonymous",
  title =        "{AIP} style manual",
  publisher =    pub-AIP,
  address =      pub-AIP:adr,
  edition =      "Fourth",
  pages =        "64",
  year =         "1990",
  ISBN =         "0-88318-642-X (paperback)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-88318-642-8 (paperback)",
  LCCN =         "QC5.45 .A45; QC28 .A5 1990; T11 .A45 1990",
  bibdate =      "Tue Nov 21 07:37:46 2000",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/typeset.bib",
  abstract =     "Covers summary information for journal contributors,
                 preparing a scientific paper for publication, general
                 style, mathematical expressions, and figures.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  libnote =      "Not yet in my library.",
  tableofcontents = "Information for journal contributors \\
                 Preparing a scientific paper for publication \\
                 General style \\
                 Mathematical expressions \\
                 Figures \\
                 Appendix A: Statements of editorial policy for AIP and
                 member society journals \\
                 Appendix B: Correct or preferred spellings of
                 frequently occurring words \\
                 Appendix C: Units of measure \\
                 Appendix D: Standard abbreviations \\
                 Appendix E: Alphabets available for typesetting \\
                 Appendix F: Special symbols available for typesetting
                 \\
                 Appendix G: Journal title abbreviations \\
                 Appendix H: Symbols used in correcting proof \\
                 Appendix I: Physics and astronomy classification scheme
                 \\
                 Appendix J: Physics auxiliary publication scheme \\
                 Appendix K: AIP transfer of copyright agreement",
}

@Book{Anonymous:1993:CMS,
  author =       "Anonymous",
  key =          "Chicago Manual of Style",
  title =        "The {Chicago} Manual of Style",
  publisher =    pub-U-CHICAGO,
  address =      pub-U-CHICAGO:adr,
  edition =      "Fourteenth",
  pages =        "ix + 921",
  year =         "1993",
  ISBN =         "0-226-10389-7",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-226-10389-1",
  LCCN =         "Z253 .U69 1993",
  bibdate =      "Mon Sep 23 08:57:34 1996",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/bibnet/subjects/han-wri-mat-sci-2ed.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/texbook3.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/typeset.bib",
  price =        "US\$40.00",
  abstract =     "Provides information on manuscript preparation,
                 punctuation, spelling, quotations, captions, tables,
                 abbreviations, references, bibliographies, notes, and
                 indexes, with sections on journals and electronic
                 media.",
  acknowledgement = ack-njh # " and " # ack-nhfb,
  annote =       "The standard American work on typesetting style etc.
                 (CHe)",
  bibliography = "yes",
  glossary =     "yes",
  history =      "First edition 1906, 12th edition 1969, 13th edition
                 1982, 14th edition 1993",
  idnumber =     "517",
  index =        "yes",
  inprint =      "yes",
  keywords =     "authorship handbooks; authorship manuals; practical
                 style manuals; printing",
  printermarks = "yes",
  subtitle =     "The Essential Guide for Writers, Editors and
                 Publishers",
  tableofcontents = "The publishing process \\
                 Books and journals \\
                 Overview \\
                 The parts of a book \\
                 The parts of a journal \\
                 Considerations for web-based publications \\
                 Manuscript preparation, manuscript editing, and
                 proofreading \\
                 Overview and process outline \\
                 Manuscript preparation guidelines for authors \\
                 Manuscript editing \\
                 Proofreading \\
                 Illustrations and tables \\
                 Overview \\
                 Illustrations \\
                 Tables \\
                 Rights, permissions, and copyright administration /
                 William S. Strong \\
                 Overview \\
                 Copyright law and the licensing of rights \\
                 The publishing agreement \\
                 Subsidiary rights and permissions \\
                 The author's responsibilities \\
                 Style and usage \\
                 Grammar and usage / Bryan A. Garner \\
                 Grammar \\
                 Word usage \\
                 Punctuation \\
                 Overview \\
                 Punctuation in relation to surrounding text \\
                 Periods \\
                 Commas \\
                 Semicolons \\
                 Colons \\
                 Question marks \\
                 Exclamation points \\
                 Hyphens and dashes \\
                 Parentheses \\
                 Brackets and braces \\
                 Slashes \\
                 Quotation marks \\
                 Apostrophes \\
                 Multiple punctuation marks \\
                 Lists and outline style \\
                 Spelling, distinctive treatment of words, and compounds
                 \\
                 Overview \\
                 Plurals \\
                 Possessives \\
                 Contractions and interjections \\
                 Word division \\
                 A and an, o and oh \\
                 Ligatures \\
                 Italics, capitals, and quotation marks \\
                 Compounds and hyphenation \\
                 Names and terms \\
                 Overview \\
                 Personal names \\
                 Titles and offices \\
                 Epithets, kinship names, and personifications \\
                 Ethnic, socioeconomic, and other groups \\
                 Names of places \\
                 Words derived from proper names \\
                 Names of organizations \\
                 Historical and cultural terms \\
                 Calendar and time designations \\
                 Religious names and terms \\
                 Military terms \\
                 Names of ships and other vehicles \\
                 Scientific terminology \\
                 Brand names and trademarks \\
                 Titles of works \\
                 Signs and mottoes \\
                 Numbers \\
                 Overview \\
                 Numerals versus words \\
                 Plurals and punctuation of numbers \\
                 Inclusive numbers \\
                 Roman numerals \\
                 Abbreviations \\
                 Overview \\
                 Names and titles \\
                 Geographical terms \\
                 Designations of time \\
                 Scholarly abbreviations \\
                 Biblical abbreviations \\
                 Technology and science \\
                 Business and commerce \\
                 Foreign languages \\
                 Overview \\
                 Titles and other proper names \\
                 Languages using the Latin alphabet \\
                 Languages usually transliterated (or romanized) \\
                 Classical Greek \\
                 Old English and middle English \\
                 American sign language \\
                 Mathematics in type \\
                 Overview \\
                 Style of mathematical expressions \\
                 Preparation and editing of paper manuscripts \\
                 Quotations and dialogue \\
                 Overview \\
                 Permissible changes to quotations \\
                 Quotations in relation to text \\
                 Quotation marks \\
                 Ellipses \\
                 Interpolations and clarifications \\
                 Citing sources in text \\
                 Foreign-language quotations \\
                 Documentation \\
                 Documentation I: notes and bibliography \\
                 Source citations: an overview \\
                 Notes and bibliography: basic format, with examples and
                 variations \\
                 Notes \\
                 Bibliographies \\
                 Books \\
                 Periodicals \\
                 Interviews and personal communications \\
                 Unpublished and informally published material \\
                 Special types of references \\
                 Audiovisual materials \\
                 Legal and public documents \\
                 Documentation II: author-date references \\
                 Overview \\
                 Author-date references: basic format, with examples and
                 variations \\
                 Reference lists and text citations \\
                 Author-date references: special cases \\
                 Indexes \\
                 Overview \\
                 Components of an index \\
                 General principles of indexing \\
                 Indexing proper names and variants \\
                 Indexing titles of publications and other works \\
                 Alphabetizing \\
                 Punctuating indexes: a summary \\
                 The mechanics of indexing \\
                 Editing an index compiled by someone else \\
                 Typographical considerations for indexes \\
                 Examples of indexes \\
                 Appendix A: production and digital technology \\
                 Overview \\
                 Markup \\
                 Design \\
                 The electronic workflow \\
                 Options for presenting content \\
                 Print technologies \\
                 Appendix B: glossary",
}

@Book{Anonymous:1996:UIP,
  editor =       "Anonymous",
  title =        "{Ulrich}'s International Periodical Directory",
  publisher =    pub-BOWKER,
  address =      pub-BOWKER:adr,
  edition =      "34th",
  pages =        "various",
  year =         "1996",
  ISBN =         "0-8352-3681-1 (vol. 4), 0-8352-3676-5 (set)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-8352-3681-2 (vol. 4), 978-0-8352-3676-8 (set)",
  ISSN =         "0000-0175",
  LCCN =         "AP1.21 .P4",
  bibdate =      "Tue Apr 30 16:53:30 1996",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  note =         "Five volumes. Volume 4 contains a numerical ISSN
                 index.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Anonymous:1999:RAB,
  author =       "Anonymous",
  title =        "Road atlas 2000 {Britain}",
  publisher =    "Ordnance Survey and Bounty",
  address =      "Southampton, UK",
  pages =        "iv + 124",
  year =         "1999",
  ISBN =         "0-7537-0138-3",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-7537-0138-6",
  bibdate =      "Sat Dec 24 15:53:15 MST 2005",
  bibsource =    "British Library [UK];
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  bookformat =   "Hardcover",
  category =     "Great Britain; Roads; atlases",
  idnumber =     "549",
}

@Book{Anonymous:2003:CMS,
  author =       "Anonymous",
  title =        "The {Chicago} Manual of Style",
  publisher =    pub-U-CHICAGO,
  address =      pub-U-CHICAGO:adr,
  edition =      "15th",
  pages =        "xvii + 956",
  year =         "2003",
  ISBN =         "0-226-10403-6",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-226-10403-4",
  LCCN =         "Z253 .U69 2003",
  bibdate =      "Wed Sep 10 17:32:05 2003",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/texbook3.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/typeset.bib",
  price =        "US\$55.00",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  history =      "First edition 1906, 12th edition 1969, 13th edition
                 1982, 14th edition 1993, 15th edition 2003",
  idnumber =     "518",
  keywords =     "authorship handbooks; authorship manuals; practical
                 style manuals; printing",
  printermarks = "yes",
  remark =       "The standard American work on typesetting style etc.",
  subtitle =     "The Essential Guide for Writers, Editors and
                 Publishers",
  tableofcontents = "1: The parts of a published work \\
                 2: Manuscript preparation and manuscript editing \\
                 3: Proofs \\
                 4: Rights and permissions \\
                 5: Grammar and usage \\
                 6: Punctuation \\
                 7: Spelling, distinctive treatment of words, and
                 compounds \\
                 8: Names and terms \\
                 9: Numbers \\
                 10: Foreign languages \\
                 11: Quotations and dialogue \\
                 12: Illustrations and captions \\
                 13: Tables \\
                 14: Mathematics in type \\
                 15: Abbreviations \\
                 16: Documentation I: Basic patterns \\
                 17: Documentation II: Specific content \\
                 18: Indexes \\
                 Appendix A: Design and production- basic procedures and
                 key terms \\
                 Appendix B: The publishing process for books and
                 journals",
}

@Misc{Anonymous:2005:BFI,
  author =       "Anonymous",
  title =        "Basic {Feynman}: An Interview with {Michelle
                 Feynman}",
  howpublished = "Web site",
  year =         "2005",
  bibdate =      "Fri Nov 23 14:15:19 2018",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/bibnet/authors/f/feynman-richard-p.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/einstein.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/physperspect.bib",
  note =         "Comments about the preparation of
                 \cite{Feynman:2005:PRD}",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Anonymous:2010:CMS,
  author =       "Anonymous",
  title =        "The {Chicago} Manual of Style",
  publisher =    pub-U-CHICAGO,
  address =      pub-U-CHICAGO:adr,
  edition =      "16th",
  pages =        "xvi + 1026",
  year =         "2010",
  ISBN =         "0-226-10420-6 (hardcover)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-226-10420-1 (hardcover)",
  LCCN =         "Z253 .U69 2010",
  bibdate =      "Tue Jan 5 16:03:16 MST 2010",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/texbook3.bib;
                 z3950.loc.gov:7090/Voyager",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  subject =      "printing; style manuals; authorship",
  tableofcontents = "The publishing process \\
                 Books and journals \\
                 Overview \\
                 The parts of a book \\
                 The parts of a journal \\
                 Considerations for web-based publications \\
                 Manuscript preparation, manuscript editing, and
                 proofreading \\
                 Overview and process outline \\
                 Manuscript preparation guidelines for authors \\
                 Manuscript editing \\
                 Proofreading \\
                 Illustrations and tables \\
                 Overview \\
                 Illustrations \\
                 Tables \\
                 Rights, permissions, and copyright administration / by
                 William S. Strong \\
                 Overview \\
                 Copyright law and the licensing of rights \\
                 The publishing agreement \\
                 Subsidiary rights and permissions \\
                 The author's responsibilities \\
                 Style and usage \\
                 Grammar and usage / by Bryan A. Garner \\
                 Grammar \\
                 Word usage \\
                 Punctuation \\
                 Overview \\
                 Punctuation in relation to surrounding text \\
                 Periods \\
                 Commas \\
                 Semicolons \\
                 Colons \\
                 Question marks \\
                 Exclamation points \\
                 Hyphens and dashes \\
                 Parentheses \\
                 Brackets and braces \\
                 Slashes \\
                 Quotation marks \\
                 Apostrophes \\
                 Multiple punctuation marks \\
                 Lists and outline style \\
                 Spelling, distinctive treatment of words, and compounds
                 \\
                 Overview \\
                 Plurals \\
                 Possessives \\
                 Contractions and interjections \\
                 Word division \\
                 A and an, o and oh \\
                 Ligatures \\
                 Italics, capitals, and quotation marks \\
                 Compounds and hyphenation \\
                 Names and terms \\
                 Overview \\
                 Personal names \\
                 Titles and offices \\
                 Epithets, kinship names, and personifications \\
                 Ethnic, socioeconomic, and other groups \\
                 Names of places \\
                 Words derived from proper names \\
                 Names of organizations \\
                 Historical and cultural terms \\
                 Calendar and time designations \\
                 Religious names and terms \\
                 Military terms \\
                 Names of ships and other vehicles \\
                 Scientific terminology \\
                 Brand names and trademarks \\
                 Titles of works \\
                 Signs and mottoes \\
                 Numbers \\
                 Overview \\
                 Numerals versus words \\
                 Plurals and punctuation of numbers \\
                 Inclusive numbers \\
                 Roman numerals \\
                 Abbreviations \\
                 Overview \\
                 Names and titles \\
                 Geographical terms \\
                 Designations of time \\
                 Scholarly abbreviations \\
                 Biblical abbreviations \\
                 Technology and science \\
                 Business and commerce \\
                 Foreign languages \\
                 Overview \\
                 Titles and other proper names \\
                 Languages using the Latin alphabet \\
                 Languages usually transliterated (or romanized) \\
                 Classical Greek \\
                 Old English and middle English \\
                 American sign language \\
                 Mathematics in type \\
                 Overview \\
                 Style of mathematical expressions \\
                 Preparation and editing of paper manuscripts \\
                 Quotations and dialogue \\
                 Overview \\
                 Permissible changes to quotations \\
                 Quotations in relation to text \\
                 Quotation marks \\
                 Ellipses \\
                 Interpolations and clarifications \\
                 Citing sources in text \\
                 Foreign-language quotations \\
                 Documentation \\
                 Documentation I: notes and bibliography \\
                 Source citations: an overview \\
                 Notes and bibliography: basic format, with examples and
                 variations \\
                 Notes \\
                 Bibliographies \\
                 Books \\
                 Periodicals \\
                 Interviews and personal communications \\
                 Unpublished and informally published material \\
                 Special types of references \\
                 Audiovisual materials \\
                 Legal and public documents \\
                 Documentation II: author-date references \\
                 Overview \\
                 Author-date references: basic format, with examples and
                 variations \\
                 Reference lists and text citations \\
                 Author-date references: special cases \\
                 Indexes \\
                 Overview \\
                 Components of an index \\
                 General principles of indexing \\
                 Indexing proper names and variants \\
                 Indexing titles of publications and other works \\
                 Alphabetizing \\
                 Punctuating indexes: a summary \\
                 The mechanics of indexing \\
                 Editing an index compiled by someone else \\
                 Typographical considerations for indexes \\
                 Examples of indexes \\
                 Appendix A: production and digital technology \\
                 Overview \\
                 Markup \\
                 Design \\
                 The electronic workflow \\
                 Options for presenting content \\
                 Print technologies \\
                 Appendix B: glossary",
}

@Book{Anonymous:2017:CMS,
  author =       "Anonymous",
  title =        "The {Chicago} Manual of Style",
  publisher =    pub-U-CHICAGO,
  address =      pub-U-CHICAGO:adr,
  edition =      "17th",
  pages =        "xvi + 1144",
  year =         "2017",
  ISBN =         "0-226-28705-X (hardcover)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-226-28705-8 (hardcover)",
  LCCN =         "Z253 .U69 2017",
  bibdate =      "Thu Apr 06 12:16:30 2017",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/texbook3.bib;
                 z3950.loc.gov:7090/Voyager",
  abstract =     "In the seven years since the previous edition debuted,
                 we have seen an extraordinary evolution in the way we
                 create and share knowledge. This seventeenth edition of
                 The Chicago Manual of Style has been prepared with an
                 eye toward how we find, create, and cite information
                 that readers are as likely to access from their pockets
                 as from a bookshelf. It offers updated guidelines on
                 electronic workflows and publication formats, tools for
                 PDF annotation and citation management, web
                 accessibility standards, and effective use of metadata,
                 abstracts, and keywords. It recognizes the needs of
                 those who are self-publishing or following open access
                 or Creative Commons publishing models. The citation
                 chapters reflect the ever-expanding universe of
                 electronic sources--including social media posts and
                 comments, private messages, and app content--and also
                 offer updated guidelines on such issues as DOIs, time
                 stamps, and e-book locators.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  subject =      "printing; style manuals; authorship",
  tableofcontents = "Part 1: The publishing process Books and journals
                 \\
                 Manuscript preparation, manuscript editing, and
                 proofreading \\
                 Illustrations and tables \\
                 Rights, permissions, and copyright administration / by
                 William S. Strong \\
                 Part 2: Style and usage \\
                 Grammar and usage / by Bryan A. Garner \\
                 Punctuation \\
                 Spelling, distinctive treatment of words, and compounds
                 \\
                 Names, terms, and titles of terms \\
                 Numbers \\
                 Abbreviations \\
                 Languages other than English \\
                 Mathematics in type \\
                 Quotations and dialogue \\
                 Part 3: Source citations and indexes \\
                 Notes and bibliography \\
                 Author--date references \\
                 Indexes",
}

@Manual{ANSI:ada,
  title =        "Military Standard {Ada} Programming Language",
  organization = pub-ANSI,
  address =      pub-ANSI:adr,
  month =        feb # " 17",
  year =         "1983",
  bibdate =      "Sun May 2 07:42:36 1999",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  note =         "Also MIL-STD-1815A. See also
                 \cite{Ada79:rationale,Ada79:refman}.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Manual{ANSI:c86,
  title =        "Draft Proposed American National Standard Programming
                 Language {C}",
  organization = pub-ANSI,
  address =      pub-ANSI:adr,
  month =        oct # " 1",
  year =         "1986",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Manual{ANSI:c88a,
  title =        "Draft Proposed American National Standard Programming
                 Language {C}",
  organization = pub-ANSI,
  address =      pub-ANSI:adr,
  month =        jan # " 11",
  year =         "1988",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Manual{ANSI:c88b,
  title =        "Draft Proposed American National Standard Programming
                 Language {C}",
  organization = pub-ANSI,
  address =      pub-ANSI:adr,
  month =        oct # " 31",
  year =         "1988",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Manual{ANSI:c89,
  title =        "{American National Standard Programming Language C,
                 ANSI X3.159-1989}",
  organization = pub-ANSI,
  address =      pub-ANSI:adr,
  month =        dec # " 14",
  year =         "1989",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Manual{ANSI:ftn66,
  title =        "{ANSI Fortran X3.9-1966}",
  organization = pub-ANSI,
  address =      pub-ANSI:adr,
  year =         "1966",
  bibdate =      "Sun May 2 07:43:16 1999",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  note =         "Approved March 7, 1966 (also known as Fortran 66). See
                 also subsequent clarifications \cite{ANSI:ftn69} and
                 \cite{ANSI:ftn71}, and history \cite{Heising:ftn}.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Article{ANSI:ftn69,
  author =       "{ANSI Subcommittee X3J3}",
  title =        "Clarification of {Fortran} Standards: Initial
                 Progress",
  journal =      j-CACM,
  volume =       "12",
  pages =        "289--294",
  year =         "1969",
  bibdate =      "Sat Oct 28 08:25:35 2000",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  note =         "See also \cite{ANSI:ftn66}.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Article{ANSI:ftn71,
  author =       "{ANSI Subcommittee X3J3}",
  title =        "Clarification of {Fortran} Standards: Second Report",
  journal =      j-CACM,
  volume =       "14",
  pages =        "628--642",
  year =         "1971",
  bibdate =      "Sat Oct 28 08:25:37 2000",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  note =         "See also \cite{ANSI:ftn66}.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Article{ANSI:ftn76,
  author =       "{ANSI Subcommittee X3J3}",
  title =        "Draft Proposed {ANS Fortran}",
  journal =      j-SIGPLAN,
  volume =       "11",
  number =       "3",
  year =         "1976",
  bibdate =      "Sat Oct 28 08:25:39 2000",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  note =         "See also final standard \cite{ANSI:ftn77}.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Manual{ANSI:ftn77,
  title =        "{ANSI Fortran X3}.9--1978",
  organization = pub-ANSI,
  address =      pub-ANSI:adr,
  year =         "1978",
  bibdate =      "Sun May 2 07:43:43 1999",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  note =         "Approved April 3, 1978 (also known as Fortran 77). See
                 also draft \cite{ANSI:ftn76}.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Manual{ANSI:ftn8x,
  title =        "Draft Proposed {ANSI Fortran X3}.9--198x",
  organization = pub-ANSI,
  address =      pub-ANSI:adr,
  month =        sep # " 18",
  year =         "1987",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  note =         "See also \cite{Metcalf:F8E87}.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Manual{ANSI:ftn92,
  title =        "{American National Standard Programming Language
                 Fortran Extended X3.198--1992}",
  organization = pub-ANSI,
  address =      pub-ANSI:adr,
  year =         "1992",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/fparith.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  note =         "This US Standard is identical to the international
                 standard, ISO 1539:1991. See also
                 \cite{Adams:1992:FHC,Brainerd:1990:PGF,Counihan:1991:F,Metcalf:1990:FE}.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Manual{ANSI:ftn9x,
  title =        "Draft Proposed {American National Standard}
                 Programming Language {Fortran} Extended
                 {X3}.198--199x",
  organization = pub-ANSI,
  address =      pub-ANSI:adr,
  month =        sep # " 24",
  year =         "1990",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  note =         "See also \cite{Metcalf:F8E87}.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Manual{ANSI:gks,
  title =        "Information Systems: Computer Graphics: Graphical
                 Kernel System ({GKS}). {ANSI X3.124-1985}",
  organization = pub-ANSI,
  address =      pub-ANSI:adr,
  year =         "1985",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  note =         "Includes Fortran bindings to GKS.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Manual{ANSI:metafile,
  title =        "Information Systems: Computer Graphics: Metafile for
                 the Storage and Transfer of Picture Description
                 Information. {ANSI X3.122-1986}",
  organization = pub-ANSI,
  address =      pub-ANSI:adr,
  year =         "1986",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Manual{ANSI:pascal,
  title =        "The Pascal Programming Language. {ANSI\slash IEEE}
                 {770X3}.97-1983",
  organization = pub-ANSI,
  address =      pub-ANSI:adr,
  year =         "1983",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  note =         "See also \cite{Jensen:1974:PUM,Jensen:1985:PUM}.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Manual{ANSI:phigs,
  title =        "Information Systems: Computer Graphics: Programmer's
                 Hierarchical Interactive Graphical System. Draft
                 proposal {X3}.144.1988",
  organization = pub-ANSI,
  address =      pub-ANSI:adr,
  year =         "1988",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Manual{ANSI:phigs+,
  title =        "{PHIGS}+ Functional Description, Revision 2.0",
  organization = pub-ANSI,
  address =      pub-ANSI:adr,
  month =        jul # " 20",
  year =         "1987",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{APA:1994:PMA,
  author =       "{American Psychological Association}",
  title =        "Publication Manual of the {American Psychological
                 Association}",
  publisher =    "American Psychological Association",
  address =      "Washington, DC, USA",
  edition =      "Fourth",
  pages =        "xxxii + 368",
  year =         "1994",
  ISBN =         "1-55798-243-0 (hardcover), 1-55798-241-4 (paperback)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-1-55798-243-8 (hardcover), 978-1-55798-241-4
                 (paperback)",
  LCCN =         "BF76.7.P82 1994",
  bibdate =      "Fri Aug 07 17:19:51 1998",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  price =        "US\$23.00 (paperback)",
  abstract =     "Rules for manuscript preparation for articles in the
                 field of psychology and other areas, but especially in
                 the 24 American Psychological Association journals. The
                 rules are arranged under 7 sections covering such
                 topics as expression of ideas, editorial style,
                 preparation, and submitting the manuscript. Appendix
                 gives instructions for handling other than journal
                 articles.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  tableofcontents = "Content and organization of a manuscript \\
                 Expressing ideas and reducing bias in language \\
                 APA editorial style \\
                 Reference list \\
                 Manuscript preparation and sample papers to be
                 submitted for publication \\
                 Material other than journal articles \\
                 Manuscript acceptance and production \\
                 Journals program of the American Psychological
                 Association \\
                 Appendix A: Checklist for manuscript submission \\
                 Appendix B: Checklist for transmitting accepted
                 manuscripts for electronic production \\
                 Appendix C: Ethical standards for the reporting and
                 publishing of scientific information \\
                 Appendix D: References to legal materials \\
                 Appendix E: Sample cover letter",
}

@Book{APA:2001:PMA,
  author =       "{American Psychological Association}",
  title =        "Publication Manual of the {American Psychological
                 Association}",
  publisher =    "American Psychological Association",
  address =      "Washington, DC, USA",
  edition =      "Fifth",
  pages =        "xxviii + 439",
  year =         "2001",
  ISBN =         "1-55798-790-4 (hardcover), 1-55798-810-2 (coil bound),
                 1-55798-791-2 (paperback)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-1-55798-790-7 (hardcover), 978-1-55798-810-2 (coil
                 bound), 978-1-55798-791-4 (paperback)",
  LCCN =         "BF76.7.P83 2001; PE1475 .P976 2001; WZ345 P83 2001",
  bibdate =      "Thu May 16 14:21:17 2002",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  abstract =     "The \booktitle{Publication Manual of the American
                 Psychological Association} is the style manual of
                 choice for writers, editors, students, educators, and
                 professionals in psychology, sociology, business,
                 economics, nursing, social work, and justice
                 administration, and other disciplines in which
                 effective communication with words and data is
                 fundamental. In addition to providing clear guidance on
                 grammar, the mechanics of writing, and APA Style, the
                 \booktitle{Publication Manual} offers an authoritative
                 and easy-to-use reference and citation system and
                 comprehensive coverage of the treatment of numbers,
                 metrication, statistical and mathematical data, tables,
                 and figures for use in writing, reports, or
                 presentations. The fifth edition has been revised and
                 updated to include: (a) the latest guidelines and
                 examples for referencing electronic and online sources;
                 (b) new and revised guidelines for submitting papers
                 electronically; (c) Improved guidelines for avoiding
                 plagiarism; (d) Simplified formatting guidelines for
                 writers using up-to-date word-processing software; (e)
                 all new guidelines for presenting case studies; (f)
                 improved guidelines for the construction of tables; (g)
                 updates on copyright and permissions issues for
                 writers; (h) new reference examples for audiovisual
                 media and patents; and (i) an expanded and improved
                 index for quick and easy access.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  libnote =      "Not in my library.",
  tableofcontents = "1: Content and organization of a manuscript \\
                 2: Expressing ideas and reducing bias in language \\
                 3: APA editorial style \\
                 4: Reference list \\
                 5: Manuscript preparation and sample papers to be
                 submitted for publication \\
                 6: Material other than journal articles \\
                 7: Manuscript acceptance and production \\
                 8: Journals program of the American Psychological
                 Association \\
                 9: Bibliography \\
                 Appendix A: Checklist for manuscript submission \\
                 Appendix B: Checklist for transmitting accepted
                 manuscripts for electronic production \\
                 Appendix C: Ethical standards for the reporting and
                 publishing of scientific information \\
                 Appendix D: References to legal materials \\
                 Appendix E: Sample cover letter",
}

@Book{APA:2010:PMA,
  author =       "{American Psychological Association}",
  title =        "Publication manual of the {American Psychological
                 Association}",
  publisher =    "American Psychological Association",
  address =      "Washington, DC, USA",
  edition =      "Sixth",
  pages =        "xviii + 272",
  year =         "2010",
  ISBN =         "1-4338-0559-6 (hardcover), 1-4338-0561-8 (softcover),
                 1-4338-0562-6 (spiral bound)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-1-4338-0559-2 (hardcover), 978-1-4338-0561-5
                 (softcover), 978-1-4338-0562-2 (spiral bound)",
  LCCN =         "BF76.7 .P83 2010",
  bibdate =      "Tue Jan 5 15:57:45 MST 2010",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 z3950.loc.gov:7090/Voyager",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  subject =      "psychology; authorship; style manuals; social
                 sciences; psychological literature; publishing;
                 handbooks, manuals, etc; social science literature",
  tableofcontents = "1. Writing for the behavioral and social sciences:
                 Types of articles \\
                 Ethical and legal standards in publishing \\
                 Ensuring the accuracy of scientific knowledge \\
                 Protecting the rights and welfare of research
                 participants \\
                 Protecting intellectual property rights \\
                 2. Manuscript structure and content: Journal article
                 reporting standards \\
                 Manuscript elements \\
                 Sample papers \\
                 3. Writing clearly and concisely: Organization \\
                 Writing style \\
                 Reducing bias in language \\
                 General guidelines for reducing bias \\
                 Reducing bias by topic \\
                 Grammar and usage \\
                 4. Mechanics of style: Punctuation \\
                 Spelling \\
                 Capitalization \\
                 Italics \\
                 Abbreviations \\
                 Numbers \\
                 Metrication \\
                 Statistical and mathematical copy \\
                 Equations \\
                 5. Displaying results: General guidance on table and
                 figures \\
                 Tables \\
                 Figures \\
                 Presenting electrophysiological, radiological, and
                 other biological data \\
                 6. Crediting sources: When to cite \\
                 Quoting and paraphrasing \\
                 Citing references in text \\
                 Reference list \\
                 Reference components \\
                 7. Reference examples: Types and variations \\
                 Examples by type \\
                 Appendix 7-1: References to legal materials \\
                 8. Publication process: Editorial process \\
                 Author responsibilities \\
                 Appendix: Journal article reporting standards (JARS),
                 Meta-analysis reporting standards (MARS), and flow of
                 participants through each stage of an experiment or
                 quasi-experiment",
}

@Book{Appelt:1988:TFP,
  author =       "Wolfgang Appelt",
  title =        "{{\TeX{} f{\"u}r Fortgeschrittene:
                 Programmiertechniken und Makropakete}}",
  publisher =    pub-AW,
  address =      pub-AW:adr,
  pages =        "x + 179",
  year =         "1988",
  ISBN =         "3-89319-115-1",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-3-89319-115-4",
  LCCN =         "????",
  bibdate =      "Wed Dec 15 08:47:26 1993",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/texbook3.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Apple:1987:TIM,
  author =       "{Apple Computer, Inc.}",
  title =        "Technical Introduction to the {Macintosh} Family",
  publisher =    pub-AW,
  address =      pub-AW:adr,
  pages =        "xix + 289",
  year =         "1987",
  ISBN =         "0-201-17765-X",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-201-17765-7",
  LCCN =         "QA76.8.M3 T43 1987",
  bibdate =      "Tue Dec 14 22:39:39 1993",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  price =        "US\$19.95",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Apple:1995:PMC,
  author =       "{Apple Computer, Inc.} and {IBM Corporation} and
                 {Motorola, Inc.}",
  title =        "{PowerPC} Microprocessor Common Hardware Reference
                 Platform: a System Architecture",
  publisher =    pub-MORGAN-KAUFMANN,
  address =      pub-MORGAN-KAUFMANN:adr,
  pages =        "xxiv + 309",
  year =         "1995",
  ISBN =         "1-55860-394-8",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-1-55860-394-3",
  LCCN =         "QA76.89.P67P74 1995",
  bibdate =      "Fri Jan 19 08:14:50 1996",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/microchip.bib",
  price =        "US\$39.95",
  abstract =     "This book is the primary source of information for
                 anyone developing a hardware platform, an operating
                 system, or hardware component to be part of these
                 standard systems. It describes the hardware to
                 operating system interface that is essential to anyone
                 building hardware platforms and provides the minimum
                 system configurations platform designers must meet when
                 building a standard platform. Component manufacturers
                 require this information to produce compatible chips
                 and adaptors to use on these platforms, and software
                 developers require the information on mandatory
                 functions and documented interfaces. The architecture
                 is intended to support a range of PowerPC
                 microprocessor-based system implementations, including
                 portable, desktop, and server class systems, and allows
                 multiple operating system implementations across a wide
                 range of environments and function. This enables new
                 hardware and software enhancements, which are necessary
                 for the development of improved user interfaces, higher
                 performance, and broader operating environments.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  tableofcontents = "Foreword \\
                 Figures \\
                 Tables \\
                 About this Document \\
                 1. Introduction \\
                 1.1 Platform Topology \\
                 2. System Requirements \\
                 2.1 System Operation \\
                 2.2 Firmware \\
                 2.3 Bi-Endian Support \\
                 2.4 64-Bit Addressing Support \\
                 2.5 Minimum System Requirements \\
                 2.6 Options and Extensions \\
                 3. System Address Map \\
                 3.1 Address Areas \\
                 3.2 Address Decoding and Translation \\
                 3.3 PC Emulation Option \\
                 4. Processor and Memory \\
                 4.1 Processor Architecture \\
                 4.2 Memory Architecture \\
                 5. I/O Bridges \\
                 5.1 PCI Host Bridge (PHB) Architecture \\
                 5.2 I/O Bus to I/O Bus Bridges \\
                 6. Interrupt Controller \\
                 6.1 Interrupt Controller Architecture \\
                 6.2 Distributed Implementation \\
                 A Proposal \\
                 7. Run-Time Abstraction Services \\
                 7.1 RTAS Introduction \\
                 7.2 RTAS Environment \\
                 7.3 RTAS Call Function Definition \\
                 8. Non-Volatile Memory \\
                 8.1 System Requirements \\
                 8.2 Structure \\
                 8.3 Signatures \\
                 8.4 Architected Partitions \\
                 8.5 NVRAM Space Management \\
                 9. I/O Devices \\
                 9.1 PCI Devices \\
                 9.2 ISA Devices \\
                 10. Error and Event Notification10.1 Introduction \\
                 10.2 RTAS Error and Event Classes \\
                 10.3 RTAS Error and Event Information Reporting \\
                 11. Power Management \\
                 11.1 Power Management Concepts \\
                 11.2 Power-Managed Platform Requirements \\
                 11.3 Operating System Requirements \\
                 12. The Symmetric Multiprocessor Option \\
                 12.1 SMP System Organization \\
                 12.2 An SMP Boot Process \\
                 Appendix A Operating System Information \\
                 Appendix B Requirements Summary \\
                 Appendix C Bi-Endian Designs \\
                 C.1 Little-Endian Address and Data Translation \\
                 C.2 Conforming Bi-Endian Designs \\
                 C.3 Software Support for Bi-Endian Operation \\
                 C.4 Bi-Modal Devices \\
                 C.5 Future Directions in Bi-Endian Architecture \\
                 Appendix D Architecture Migration Notes \\
                 Glossary \\
                 Trademark Information \\
                 Bibliography \\
                 Index",
}

@Book{Arabatzis:2006:REB,
  author =       "Theodore Arabatzis",
  title =        "Representing Electrons: a Biographical Approach to
                 Theoretical Entities",
  publisher =    pub-U-CHICAGO,
  address =      pub-U-CHICAGO:adr,
  pages =        "xiv + 295",
  year =         "2006",
  ISBN =         "0-226-02420-2 (hardcover), 0-226-02421-0 (paperback),
                 0-226-02422-9 (e-book)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-226-02420-2 (hardcover), 978-0-226-02421-9
                 (paperback), 978-0-226-02422-6 (e-book)",
  LCCN =         "QC793.5.E62 A73 2011",
  bibdate =      "Fri Oct 31 07:44:34 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "fsz3950.oclc.org:210/WorldCat;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  URL =          "http://public.eblib.com/choice/publicfullrecord.aspx?p=709999",
  abstract =     "Using the electron --- or rather its representation
                 --- as a historical actor, Theodore Arabatzis
                 illustrates the emergence and gradual consolidation of
                 its representation in physics, its career throughout
                 old quantum theory, and its appropriation and
                 reinterpretation by chemists. As Arabatzis develops
                 this novel biographical approach, he portrays
                 scientific representations as partly autonomous agents
                 with lives of their own. Furthermore, he argues that
                 the considerable variance in the representation of the
                 electron does not undermine its stable identity or
                 existence. Raising philosophical issues of contentious
                 debate in the history and philosophy of science ---
                 namely, scientific realism and meaning change ---
                 Arabatzis addresses the history of the electron across
                 disciplines, integrating historical narrative with
                 philosophical analysis in a book that will be a
                 touchstone for historians and philosophers of science
                 and scientists alike.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  libnote =      "Not in my library.",
  subject =      "Electrons; History; Realism; Science; Philosophy;
                 Physics",
  tableofcontents = "Acknowledgements \\
                 Introduction \\
                 1: Methodological Preliminaries \\
                 2: Why Write Biographies of Theoretical Entities? \\
                 3: Rethinking ``the Discovery of the Electron'' \\
                 4: The Birth and Infancy of the Representation of the
                 Electron \\
                 5: The Genesis of the Quantum Electron \\
                 6: Between Relativity and Correspondence \\
                 7: ``How the Electrons Spend Their Leisure Time'': The
                 Chemists' Perspective \\
                 8: Forced to Spin by Uhlenbeck and Goudsmit \\
                 9: Identifying the Electron: Meaning Variance and the
                 Historicity of Scientific Realism",
}

@InProceedings{Arasu:2002:PCS,
  author =       "Arvind Arasu and Jasmine Novak and Andrew Tomkins and
                 John Tomlin",
  booktitle =    "Proceedings of the Eleventh International World Wide
                 Web Conference, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA, 7--11 May 2002",
  title =        "{PageRank} Computation and the Structure of the {Web}:
                 Experiments and Algorithms",
  publisher =    pub-ACM,
  address =      pub-ACM:adr,
  bookpages =    "748",
  year =         "2002",
  ISBN =         "1-880672-20-0",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-1-880672-20-4",
  LCCN =         "TK5105.888 Wic 11 2002",
  bibdate =      "Thu Oct 24 15:18:39 2002",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 http://www2002.org/CDROM/",
  URL =          "http://www2002.org/CDROM/poster/173.pdf",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  annote =       "PageRank is the Google search algorithm.",
  pagecount =    "5",
}

@Book{Arbib:1981:BTC,
  author =       "Michael A. Arbib and A. J. Kfoury and Robert N. Moll",
  title =        "A Basis for Theoretical Computer Science",
  publisher =    pub-SV,
  address =      pub-SV:adr,
  pages =        "viii + 220",
  year =         "1981",
  ISBN =         "0-387-90573-1",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-387-90573-0",
  LCCN =         "QA267 .A715",
  bibdate =      "Tue Dec 14 22:39:53 1993",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Arfken:2005:MMP,
  author =       "George B. Arfken and Hans-J{\"u}rgen Weber",
  title =        "Mathematical Methods for Physicists",
  publisher =    pub-ELSEVIER,
  address =      pub-ELSEVIER:adr,
  edition =      "Sixth",
  pages =        "xii + 1182",
  year =         "2005",
  ISBN =         "0-12-059876-0, 0-12-088584-0 (paperback)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-12-059876-2, 978-0-12-088584-8 (paperback)",
  LCCN =         "QA37.3 .A74 2005",
  bibdate =      "Tue Feb 17 18:23:45 MST 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/elefunt.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 z3950.loc.gov:7090/Voyager",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  subject =      "Mathematics; Mathematical physics",
  tableofcontents = "1. Vector Analysis \\
                 2. Vector Analysis in Curved Coordinates and Tensors
                 \\
                 3. Determinants and Matrices \\
                 4. Group Theory \\
                 5. Infinite Series \\
                 6. Functions of a Complex Variable I: Analytic
                 Properties, Mapping \\
                 7. Functions of a Complex Variable II \\
                 8. The Gamma Function (Factorial Function) \\
                 9. Differential Equations \\
                 10. Sturm--Liouville Theory-Orthogonal Functions \\
                 11. Bessel Functions \\
                 12. Legendre Functions \\
                 13. More Special Functions \\
                 14. Fourier Series \\
                 15. Integral Transforms \\
                 16. Integral Equations \\
                 17. Calculus of Variations \\
                 18. Nonlinear Methods and Chaos \\
                 19. Probability",
  xxauthor =     "George B. (George Brown) Arfken and Hans-J{\"u}rgen
                 Weber",
  xxURL =        "http://www.loc.gov/catdir/enhancements/fy0625/2005049844-d.html;
                 http://www.loc.gov/catdir/enhancements/fy0625/2005049844-t.html",
}

@Book{Arianrhod:2003:EHI,
  author =       "Robyn Arianrhod",
  title =        "{Einstein}'s heroes: imagining the world through the
                 language of mathematics",
  publisher =    "University of Queensland Press",
  address =      "St Lucia, Queensland, Australia",
  pages =        "viii + 323",
  year =         "2003",
  ISBN =         "0-7022-3408-7",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-7022-3408-8",
  LCCN =         "QC19.6 .A75 2003",
  bibdate =      "Mon Apr 23 09:09:08 MDT 2007",
  bibsource =    "catalogue.nla.gov.au:7090/Voyager;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/bibnet/authors/c/clerk-maxwell-james.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/einstein.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/physperspect.bib",
  price =        "US\$24.00",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  libnote =      "Not in my library.",
  subject =      "Maxwell, James Clerk; Einstein, Albert; Physics;
                 History; Mathematics; Science; Popular works;
                 Scientists; Biography",
  subject-dates = "1831--1879 (Maxwell); 1879--1955 (Einstein)",
  tableofcontents = "A seamless intertwining \\
                 A reluctant revolutionary \\
                 Beetles, strings and sealing wax \\
                 The nature of physics \\
                 The language of physics \\
                 Why Newton held the world in thrall \\
                 Rites of passage \\
                 A fledgling physicist \\
                 Electromagnetic controversy \\
                 Mathematics as language \\
                 The magical synthesis of algebra an geometry \\
                 Maxwell's mathematical language \\
                 Maxwell's rainbow \\
                 Imagining the world with the language of mathematics: a
                 revolution in physics",
}

@Book{Arianrhod:2005:EHI,
  author =       "Robyn Arianrhod",
  title =        "{Einstein}'s heroes: imagining the world through the
                 language of mathematics",
  publisher =    pub-OXFORD,
  address =      pub-OXFORD:adr,
  pages =        "xiii + 323",
  year =         "2005",
  ISBN =         "0-19-518370-3 (hardcover), 0-19-530890-5 (paperback)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-19-518370-2 (hardcover), 978-0-19-530890-7
                 (paperback)",
  LCCN =         "QC19.6 .A75 2005",
  bibdate =      "Fri Nov 17 12:24:46 2006",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/einstein.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/physperspect.bib;
                 z3950.loc.gov:7090/Voyager",
  URL =          "ftp://uiarchive.cso.uiuc.edu/pub/etext/gutenberg/;
                 http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip053/2004026055.html",
  abstract =     "Blending science, history, and biography, this book
                 reveals the mysteries of mathematics, focusing on the
                 life and work of three of Albert Einstein's heroes:
                 Isaac Newton, Michael Faraday, and especially James
                 Clerk Maxwell, whose portrait hung on Einstein's
                 laboratory wall and whose work directly inspired the
                 theory of relativity. In this book, Robyn Arianrhod
                 bridges the gap between science and literature,
                 portraying mathematics as a language and arguing that a
                 physical theory is a work of imagination involving the
                 elegant and clever use of this language. Her narrative
                 centers on the work of Maxwell, the first scientist to
                 embrace the ambiguous relationship between language and
                 reality - the first to accept that, in a very real
                 sense, language is reality.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  remark =       "Originally published in \cite{Arianrhod:2003:EHI}.",
  subject =      "Maxwell, James Clerk; Einstein, Albert; Mathematical
                 physics; History; Physicists; Biography; Science;
                 Popular works",
  subject-dates = "1831--1879 (Maxwell); 1879--1955 (Einstein)",
  tableofcontents = "A seamless intertwining \\
                 A reluctant revolutionary \\
                 Beetles, strings and sealing wax \\
                 The nature of physics \\
                 The language of physics \\
                 Why Newton held the world in thrall \\
                 Rites of passage \\
                 A fledgling physicist \\
                 Electromagnetic controversy \\
                 Mathematics as language \\
                 The magical synthesis of algebra an geometry \\
                 Maxwell's mathematical language \\
                 Maxwell's rainbow \\
                 Imagining the world with the language of mathematics: a
                 revolution in physics",
}

@Book{Arndt:2001:PU,
  author =       "J{\"o}rg Arndt and Christoph Haenel",
  title =        "Pi --- Unleashed",
  publisher =    pub-SV,
  address =      pub-SV:adr,
  pages =        "xii + 270",
  year =         "2001",
  ISBN =         "3-540-66572-2 (paperback), 3-642-56735-5 (e-book)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-3-540-66572-4 (paperback), 978-3-642-56735-3
                 (e-book)",
  LCCN =         "QA484.A7513 2001",
  bibdate =      "Sat Apr 20 11:01:28 2002",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/bibnet/authors/b/borwein-jonathan-m.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/pi.bib",
  note =         "Includes CD-ROM. Translated from the German by
                 Catriona and David Lischka.",
  price =        "US\$",
  abstract =     "Never in the 4000-year history of research into pi
                 have results been so prolific as at present. In their
                 book Joerg Arndt and Christoph Haenel describe in
                 easy-to-understand language the latest and most
                 fascinating findings of mathematicians and computer
                 scientists in the field of pi. Attention is focused on
                 new methods of computation whose speed outstrips that
                 of predecessor methods by orders of magnitude. The book
                 comes with a CD-ROM containing not only the source code
                 of all programs described, but also related texts and
                 even complete libraries.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  tableofcontents = "1: The state of Pi art / 1 \\
                 2: How random is $\pi$? / 21 \\
                 3: Shortcuts to $\pi$ / 35 \\
                 4: Aproximations for $\pi$ and continued fractions / 51
                 \\
                 5: Arcus tangens / 69 \\
                 6: Spigot algorithms / 77 \\
                 7: Gauss and $\pi$ / 87 \\
                 8: Ramanujan and $\pi$ / 103 \\
                 9: The Borweins and $\pi$ / 113 \\
                 10: The BBP algorithm / 117 \\
                 11: Arithmetic / 131 \\
                 12: Miscellaneous / 153 \\
                 13: The history of $\pi$ / 165 \\
                 14: Historical notes / 209 \\
                 15: The future: $\pi$ calculations on the Internet /
                 215 \\
                 16: $\pi$ formula collection / 223 \\
                 17: Tables / 239 \\
                 A: Documentation for the {\tt hfloat} Library / 247 \\
                 Bibliography / 257 \\
                 Index / 265",
}

@Book{Arnold:2000:JPL,
  author =       "Ken Arnold and James Gosling and David Holmes",
  title =        "The {Java} Programming Language",
  publisher =    pub-AW,
  address =      pub-AW:adr,
  edition =      "Third",
  pages =        "xxiv + 595",
  year =         "2000",
  ISBN =         "0-201-70433-1 (paperback)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-201-70433-4 (paperback)",
  LCCN =         "QA76.73.J38 A76 2000",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 24 17:48:00 2001",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/java2000.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  price =        "US\$37.95",
  abstract =     "This Third Edition of \booktitle{The Java Programming
                 Language} is a valuable resource for both novice and
                 advanced programmers. More than 100,000 developers who
                 programmed with C, C++, Smalltalk, or other high-level
                 languages have used this book to get a concise,
                 intelligent, and deep understanding of the Java
                 programming language. This book is what you need to
                 understand the basic design goals of the language and
                 the application of the language in real-world
                 development. It provides unique insights into why and
                 how the language was designed and intended to be used.
                 The authors describe the latest version of the
                 language, as defined in the Java Language
                 Specification, Second Edition and implemented in
                 version 1.3 of the Java 2 SDK, Standard Edition. This
                 third edition has been structured to give more in-depth
                 treatment of the newer language features, as well as
                 informative examples on using some of the new APIs. New
                 and/or revised in this edition: more details on
                 language features, including an expanded section on
                 nested classes; more comprehensive treatment of garbage
                 collection and related programming issues; and coverage
                 of new APIs, such as collections and
                 internationalization. Thoroughly revised from start to
                 finish, this edition fully covers the features of the
                 current release of the Java programming language and
                 class libraries. The book serves as a tutorial
                 introduction to the language and essential libraries as
                 well as a reference. Experienced programmers will find
                 this new edition to be a valuable reference, and will
                 gain new insights into the subtleties of the language.
                 Novice and intermediate programmers will benefit from
                 the valuable examples and clear explanations of
                 language and library features. Make sure you understand
                 the contents of this book before you begin any serious
                 development for the Java platform.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  tableofcontents = "A Quick Tour / 1 \\
                 Getting Started / 1 \\
                 Variables / 3 \\
                 1.2: Variables / 3 \\
                 1.3: Comments in Code / 6 \\
                 1.4: Named Constants / 6 \\
                 1.5: Unicode Characters / 8 \\
                 1.6: Flow of Control / 9 \\
                 1.7: Classes and Objects / 11 \\
                 1.7.1: Creating Objects / 12 \\
                 1.7.2: Static or Class Fields / 13 \\
                 1.7.3: Garbage Collector / 14 \\
                 1.8: Methods and Parameters / 14 \\
                 1.8.1: Invoking a Method / 15 \\
                 1.8.2: This Reference / 16 \\
                 1.8.3: Static or Class Methods / 17 \\
                 1.9: Arrays / 17 \\
                 1.10: String Objects / 20 \\
                 1.11: Extending a Class / 22 \\
                 1.11.1: Invoking Methods from the Superclass / 23 \\
                 1.11.2: Object Class / 24 \\
                 1.11.3: Type Casting / 25 \\
                 1.12: Interfaces / 25 \\
                 1.13: Exceptions / 27 \\
                 1.14: Packages / 30 \\
                 1.15: Java Platform / 32 \\
                 1.16: Other Topics Briefly Noted / 33 \\
                 2: Classes and Objects / 35 \\
                 2.1: A Simple Class / 36 \\
                 2.1.1: Class Members / 36 \\
                 2.1.2: Class Modifiers / 37 \\
                 2.2: Fields / 38 \\
                 2.2.1: Field Initialization / 38 \\
                 2.2.2: Static Fields / 39 \\
                 2.2.3: final Fields / 40 \\
                 2.3: Access Control / 41 \\
                 2.4: Creating Objects / 42 \\
                 2.5: Construction and Initialization / 43 \\
                 2.5.1: Constructors / 44 \\
                 2.5.2: Initialization Blocks / 48 \\
                 2.5.3: Static Initialization / 49 \\
                 2.6: Methods / 50 \\
                 2.6.1: Static Methods / 51 \\
                 2.6.2: Method Invocations / 51 \\
                 2.6.3: Method Execution and Return / 53 \\
                 2.6.4: Parameter Values / 54 \\
                 2.6.5: Using Methods to Control Access / 57 \\
                 2.7: this / 59 \\
                 2.8: Overloading Methods / 61 \\
                 2.9: Main Method / 62 \\
                 2.10: Native Methods / 63 \\
                 3: Extending Classes / 65 \\
                 3.1: An Extended Class / 66 \\
                 3.2: Constructors in Extended Classes / 69 \\
                 3.2.1: Constructor Order Dependencies / 71 \\
                 3.3: Inheriting and Redefining Members / 73 \\
                 3.3.1: Overriding / 73 \\
                 3.3.2: Hiding Fields / 74 \\
                 3.3.3: Accessing Inherited Members / 75 \\
                 3.3.4: Accessibility and Overriding / 77 \\
                 3.3.5: Hiding Static Members / 77 \\
                 3.3.6: Super Keyword / 78 \\
                 3.4: Type Compatibility and Conversion / 79 \\
                 3.4.1: Compatibility / 79 \\
                 3.4.2: Explicit Type Casting / 80 \\
                 3.4.3: Testing for Type / 80 \\
                 3.5: What protected Really Means / 81 \\
                 3.6: Marking Methods and Classes final / 84 \\
                 3.7: Abstract Classes and Methods / 85 \\
                 3.8: Object Class / 87 \\
                 3.9: Cloning Objects / 89 \\
                 3.9.1: Strategies for Cloning / 89 \\
                 3.9.2: Correct Cloning / 91 \\
                 3.9.3: Shallow versus Deep Cloning / 94 \\
                 3.10: Extending Classes: How and When / 95 \\
                 3.11: Designing a Class to Be Extended / 96 \\
                 3.11.1: Designing an Extensible Framework / 97 \\
                 3.12: Single Inheritance versus Multiple Inheritance /
                 102 \\
                 4: Interfaces / 105 \\
                 4.1: A Simple Interface Example / 106 \\
                 4.2: Interface Declarations / 108 \\
                 4.2.1: Interface Constants / 109 \\
                 4.2.2: Interface Methods / 109 \\
                 4.2.3: Interface Modifiers / 110 \\
                 4.3: Extending Interfaces / 110 \\
                 4.3.1: Inheriting and Hiding Constants / 111 \\
                 4.3.2: Inheriting, Overriding, and Overloading Methods
                 / 112 \\
                 4.4: Working with Interfaces / 113 \\
                 4.4.1: Implementing Interfaces / 114 \\
                 4.4.2: Using an Implementation / 116 \\
                 4.5: Marker Interfaces / 117 \\
                 4.6: When to Use Interfaces / 118 \\
                 5: Nested Classes and Interfaces / 121 \\
                 5.1: Static Nested Types / 121 \\
                 5.1.1: Static Nested Classes / 122 \\
                 5.1.2: Nested Interfaces / 123 \\
                 5.2: Inner Classes / 123 \\
                 5.2.1: Accessing Enclosing Objects / 125 \\
                 5.2.2: Extending Inner Classes / 126 \\
                 5.2.3: Inheritance, Scoping, and Hiding / 127 \\
                 5.3: Local Inner Classes / 129 \\
                 5.4: Anonymous Inner Classes / 131 \\
                 5.5: Inheriting Nested Types / 132 \\
                 5.6: Nesting in Interfaces / 134 \\
                 5.6.1: Modifiable Variables in Interfaces / 135 \\
                 5.7: Implementation of Nested Types / 136 \\
                 6: Tokens, Operators, and Expressions / 137 \\
                 6.1: Lexical Elements / 137 \\
                 6.1.1: Character Set / 138 \\
                 6.1.3: Tokens / 139 \\
                 6.1.4: Identifiers / 140 \\
                 6.1.5: Keywords / 141 \\
                 6.2: Types and Literals / 141 \\
                 6.2.1: Reference Literals / 142 \\
                 6.2.2: Boolean Literals / 142 \\
                 6.2.3: Character Literals / 142 \\
                 6.2.4: Integer Literals 143 \\
                 6.2.5: Floating-Point Literals / 143 \\
                 6.2.6: String Literals / 144 \\
                 6.2.7: Class Literals / 144 \\
                 6.3: Variables / 144 \\
                 6.3.1: Field and Local Variable Declarations / 145 \\
                 6.3.2: Parameter Variables / 146 \\
                 6.3.3: final Variables / 146 \\
                 6.4: Array Variables / 148 \\
                 6.4.1: Array Modifiers / 149 \\
                 6.4.2: Arrays of Arrays / 149 \\
                 6.4.3: Array Initialization / 150 \\
                 6.4.4: Arrays and Types / 151 \\
                 6.5: Meanings of Names / 152 \\
                 6.6: Arithmetic Operations / 156 \\
                 6.6.1: Integer Arithmetic / 156 \\
                 6.6.2: Floating-Point Arithmetic / 156 \\
                 6.6.3: Strict and non-Strict Floating-Point Arithmetic
                 / 158 \\
                 6.7: General Operators / 159 \\
                 6.7.1: Increment and Decrement Operators / 159 \\
                 6.7.2: Relational and Equality Operators / 160 \\
                 6.7.3: Logical Operators / 161 \\
                 6.7.4: instanceof / 162 \\
                 6.7.5: Bit Manipulation Operators / 163 \\
                 6.7.6: Conditional Operator?: / 164 \\
                 6.7.7: Assignment Operators / 165 \\
                 6.7.8: String Concatenation Operator / 167 \\
                 6.7.9: new / 167 \\
                 6.8: Expressions / 168 \\
                 6.8.1: Order of Evaluation / 168 \\
                 6.8.2: Expression Type / 169 \\
                 6.8.3: Implicit Type Conversions / 169 \\
                 6.8.4: Explicit Type Casts / 171 \\
                 6.8.5: String Conversions / 172 \\
                 6.9: Member Access / 173 \\
                 6.9.1: Finding the Right Method / 173 \\
                 6.10: Operator Precedence and Associativity / 176 \\
                 7: Control Flow / 179 \\
                 7.1: Statements and Blocks / 179 \\
                 7.2: if-else / 180 \\
                 7.3: switch / 182 \\
                 7.4: while and do-while / 185 \\
                 7.5: for / 186 \\
                 7.6: Labels / 189 \\
                 7.7: break / 189 \\
                 7.8: continue / 192 \\
                 7.9: return / 193 \\
                 7.10: What, No goto? / 193 \\
                 8: Exceptions / 195 \\
                 8.1: Creating Exception Types / 196 \\
                 8.2: throw / 197 \\
                 8.2.1: Transfer of Control / 198 \\
                 8.2.2: Asynchronous Exceptions / 198 \\
                 8.3: Throws Clause / 199 \\
                 8.3.1: throws Clauses and Method Overriding / 200 \\
                 8.3.2: throws Clauses and Native Methods / 201 \\
                 8.4: try, catch, and finally / 202 \\
                 8.4.1: finally / 204 \\
                 8.5: When to Use Exceptions / 206 \\
                 9: Strings / 209 \\
                 9.1: Basic String Operations / 209 \\
                 9.2: String Comparisons / 211 \\
                 9.2.1: String Literal Equivalence / 214 \\
                 9.3: Utility Methods / 215 \\
                 9.4: Making Related Strings / 215 \\
                 9.5: String Conversions / 217 \\
                 9.6: Strings and char Arrays / 218 \\
                 9.7: Strings and byte Arrays / 220 \\
                 9.7.1: Character Encodings / 221 \\
                 9.8: StringBuffer Class / 222 \\
                 9.8.1: Modifying the Buffer / 223 \\
                 9.8.2: Getting Data Out / 225 \\
                 9.8.3: Capacity Management / 226 \\
                 10: Threads / 227 \\
                 10.1: Creating Threads / 229 \\
                 10.2: Using Runnable / 231 \\
                 10.3: Synchronization / 235 \\
                 10.3.1: synchronized Methods / 235 \\
                 10.3.2: Static Synchronized Methods / 238 \\
                 10.3.3: synchronized Statements / 238 \\
                 10.3.4: Synchronization Designs / 242 \\
                 10.4: wait, notifyAll, and notify / 244 \\
                 10.5: Details of Waiting and Notification / 246 \\
                 10.6: Thread Scheduling / 248 \\
                 10.6.1: Voluntary Rescheduling / 249 \\
                 10.7: Deadlocks / 252 \\
                 10.8: Ending Thread Execution / 254 \\
                 10.8.1: Cancelling a Thread / 255 \\
                 10.8.2: Waiting for a Thread to Complete / 257 \\
                 10.9: Ending Application Execution / 259 \\
                 10.10: volatile / 260 \\
                 10.11: Thread Management, Security and ThreadGroup /
                 261 \\
                 10.12: Threads and Exceptions / 266 \\
                 10.12.1: Don't stop / 266 \\
                 10.13: ThreadLocal Variables / 267 \\
                 10.14: Debugging Threads / 269 \\
                 11: Programming with Types / 271 \\
                 11.1: Wrapper Classes / 272 \\
                 11.1.1: Void / 274 \\
                 11.1.2: Boolean / 274 \\
                 11.1.3: Character / 275 \\
                 11.1.4: Number / 279 \\
                 11.1.5: Integer Wrappers / 279 \\
                 11.1.6: Floating-Point Wrapper Classes / 281 \\
                 11.2: Reflection / 282 \\
                 11.2.1: Class class / 283 \\
                 11.2.2: Naming Classes / 287 \\
                 11.2.3: Examining Class Members / 288 \\
                 11.2.4: Modifier Class / 292 \\
                 11.2.5: Field Class / 292 \\
                 11.2.6: Method Class / 294 \\
                 11.2.7: Creating New Objects and the Constructor Class
                 / 296 \\
                 11.2.8: Access Checking and AccessibleObject / 299 \\
                 11.2.9: Arrays / 299 \\
                 11.2.10: Packages / 301 \\
                 11.2.11: Proxy Classl / 301 \\
                 11.3: Loading Classes / 304 \\
                 11.3.1: ClassLoader Class / 307 \\
                 11.3.2: Preparing a Class for use / 309 \\
                 11.3.3: Loading Related Resources / 310 \\
                 12: Garbage Collection and Memory / 313 \\
                 12.1: Garbage Collection / 313 \\
                 12.2: A Simple Model / 314 \\
                 12.3: Finalization / 316 \\
                 12.3.1: Resurrecting Objects during finalize / 318 \\
                 12.4: Interacting with the Garbage Collector / 318 \\
                 12.5: Reachability States and Reference Objects / 320
                 \\
                 12.5.1: Reference Class / 321 \\
                 12.5.2: Strengths of Reference and Reachability / 321
                 \\
                 12.5.3: Reference Queues / 325 \\
                 13: Packages / 329 \\
                 13.1: Package Naming / 330 \\
                 13.2: Type Imports / 331 \\
                 13.3: Package Access / 332 \\
                 13.3.1: Accessibility and Overriding Methods / 333 \\
                 13.4: Package Contents / 336 \\
                 13.5: Package Objects and Specifications / 337 \\
                 14: Documentation Comments / 341 \\
                 14.1: Anatomy of a Doc Comment / 342 \\
                 14.2: Tags / 343 \\
                 14.2.1: <at>see / 343 \\
                 14.2.2: <at>link / 344 \\
                 14.2.3: <at>param / 345 \\
                 14.2.4: <at>return / 345 \\
                 14.2.5: <at>throws and <at>exception / 345 \\
                 14.2.6: <at>deprecated / 345 \\
                 14.2.7: <at>author / 346 \\
                 14.2.8: <at>version / 346 \\
                 14.2.9: <at>since / 346 \\
                 14.2.10: <at>docRoot / 347 \\
                 14.3: An Example / 347 \\
                 14.4: External Conventions / 352 \\
                 14.4.1: Overview and Package Documentation / 352 \\
                 14.4.2: Doc-files Directory / 353 \\
                 14.5: Notes on Usage / 353 \\
                 15: I/O Package / 355 \\
                 15.1: Byte Streams / 357 \\
                 15.1.1: InputStream / 357 \\
                 15.1.2: OutputStream / 360 \\
                 15.2: Character Streams / 362 \\
                 15.2.1: Reader / 363 \\
                 15.2.2: Writer / 366 \\
                 15.2.3: Character Streams and the Standard Streams /
                 367 \\
                 15.3: InputStreamReader and OutputStreamWriter / 367
                 \\
                 15.4: A Quick Tour of The Stream Classes / 369 \\
                 15.4.1: Synchronization and Concurrency / 370 \\
                 15.4.2: Filter Streams / 371 \\
                 15.4.3: Buffered Streams / 374 \\
                 15.4.4: Piped Streams / 375 \\
                 \ldots{} [section numbers unavailable] \\
                 Piped Streams / 375 \\
                 ByteArray Byte Streams / 377 \\
                 CharArray Character Streams / 378 \\
                 String Character Streams / 379 \\
                 Print Streams / 380 \\
                 LineNumberReader / 381 \\
                 SequenceInputStream / 383 \\
                 Pushback Streams / 384 \\
                 StreamTokenizer / 386 \\
                 The Data Byte Streams / 391 \\
                 DataInput and DataOutput / 392 \\
                 The Data Stream Classes / 393 \\
                 Working with Files / 395 \\
                 File Streams and FileDescriptor / 395 \\
                 RandomAccessFile / 396 \\
                 The File Class / 398 \\
                 FilenameFilter and FileFilter / 404 \\
                 Object Serialization / 405 \\
                 The Object Byte Streams / 405 \\
                 Making Your Classes Serializable / 406 \\
                 Serialization and Deserialization Order / 408 \\
                 Customized Serialization / 409 \\
                 Object Versioning / 413 \\
                 Serialized Fields / 414 \\
                 The Externalizable Interface / 416 \\
                 Documentation Comment Tags / 417 \\
                 The IOException Classes / 418 \\
                 Collections / 421 \\
                 Collections / 421 \\
                 Exception Conventions / 424 \\
                 Iteration / 425 \\
                 Ordering using Comparable and Comparator / 427 \\
                 The Collection Interface / 428 \\
                 Set and SortedSet / 430 \\
                 HashSet / 432 \\
                 TreeSet / 432 \\
                 List / 433 \\
                 ArrayList / 435 \\
                 LinkedList / 436 \\
                 Map and SortedMap / 437 \\
                 HashMap / 440 \\
                 TreeMap / 441 \\
                 WeakHashMap / 442 \\
                 Wrapped Collections and the Collections Class / 442 \\
                 The Synchronization Wrappers / 443 \\
                 The Unmodifiable Wrappers / 444 \\
                 The Collections Utilities / 445 \\
                 The Arrays Utility Class / 448 \\
                 Writing Iterator Implementations / 448 \\
                 Writing Collection Implementations / 451 \\
                 The Legacy Collection Types / 456 \\
                 Enumeration / 457 \\
                 Vector / 457 \\
                 Stack / 459 \\
                 Dictionary / 459 \\
                 Hashtable / 460 \\
                 Properties / 460 \\
                 Miscellaneous Utilities / 463 \\
                 BitSet / 464 \\
                 Observer/Observable / 466 \\
                 Random / 470 \\
                 StringTokenizer / 472 \\
                 Timer and TimerTask / 473 \\
                 Math and StrictMath / 477 \\
                 System Programming / 479 \\
                 The System Class / 480 \\
                 Standard I/O Streams / 480 \\
                 System Properties / 481 \\
                 Utility Methods / 483 \\
                 Creating Processes / 484 \\
                 The Process Class / 485 \\
                 Process Environments / 487 \\
                 Portability / 488 \\
                 Shutdown / 488 \\
                 Shutdown Hooks / 489 \\
                 The Shutdown Sequence / 490 \\
                 Shutdown Strategies / 491 \\
                 The Rest of the Runtime / 492 \\
                 Loading Native Code / 492 \\
                 Debugging / 493 \\
                 Security / 493 \\
                 The SecurityManager Class / 494 \\
                 Permissions / 496 \\
                 Security Policies / 497 \\
                 Access Controllers and Privileged Execution / 497 \\
                 Internationalization and Localization / 501 \\
                 Locale / 502 \\
                 Resource Bundles / 504 \\
                 ListResourceBundle / 507 \\
                 PropertyResourceBundle / 508 \\
                 Subclassing ResourceBundle / 509 \\
                 Time, Dates, and Calendars / 509 \\
                 Calendars / 510 \\
                 Time Zones / 514 \\
                 GregorianCalendar and SimpleTimeZone / 515 \\
                 Formatting and Parsing Dates and Times / 517 \\
                 Internationalization and Localization for Text / 520
                 \\
                 Collation / 520 \\
                 Formatting and Parsing / 522 \\
                 Text Boundaries / 524 \\
                 Standard Packages / 527 \\
                 java.awt --- The Abstract Window Toolkit / 529 \\
                 java.applet --- Applets / 532 \\
                 java.beans --- Components / 533 \\
                 java.math --- Mathematics / 534 \\
                 java.net --- The Network / 535 \\
                 java.rmi --- Remote Method Invocation / 538 \\
                 java.security --- Security Tools / 543 \\
                 java.sql --- Relational Database Access / 544 \\
                 Utility Subpackages / 544 \\
                 Archive Files --- java.util.jar / 544 \\
                 ZIP Files --- java.util.zip / 545 \\
                 javax.* --- Standard Extensions / 546 \\
                 javax.accessibility --- Accessibility for GUIs / 546
                 \\
                 javax.naming --- Directory and Naming Services / 547
                 \\
                 javax.sound --- Sound Manipulation / 548 \\
                 javax.swing --- Swing GUI Components / 549 \\
                 org.omg.CORBA --- CORBA APIs / 549 \\
                 Runtime Exceptions / 551 \\
                 RuntimeException Classes / 552 \\
                 Error Classes / 554 \\
                 Useful Tables / 557 \\
                 Keywords / 557 \\
                 Operator Precedence / 558 \\
                 Unicode Digits / 558 \\
                 Unicode Letters and Digits / 559 \\
                 Special Characters Using / 560 \\
                 Documentation Comment Tags / 560 \\
                 Unicode Character Blocks / 561 \\
                 Further Reading / 563 \\
                 Index / 569",
}

@Book{Artwick:1984:ACM,
  author =       "Bruce A. Artwick",
  title =        "Applied Concepts in Microcomputer Graphics",
  publisher =    pub-PH,
  address =      pub-PH:adr,
  pages =        "ix + 374",
  year =         "1984",
  ISBN =         "0-13-039322-3",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-13-039322-7",
  LCCN =         "T385 .A77 1984",
  bibdate =      "Wed Dec 15 08:17:32 1993",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Artwick:1985:ACM,
  author =       "Bruce A. Artwick",
  title =        "Applied Concepts in Microcomputer Graphics",
  publisher =    pub-PH,
  address =      pub-PH:adr,
  edition =      "Second",
  pages =        "ix + 374",
  year =         "1985",
  ISBN =         "0-13-580226-1 (paperback), 0-13-039322-3 (hardcover)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-13-580226-7 (paperback), 978-0-13-039322-7
                 (hardcover)",
  LCCN =         "T385 .A77 1985",
  bibdate =      "Wed Dec 15 08:17:32 1993",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  tableofcontents = "Applications of microcomputer graphics \\
                 Display generation basics \\
                 Working with display generation hardware \\
                 An introduction to peripheral graphics devices \\
                 Interactive design elements and intelligence \\
                 Design and simulation system interaction \\
                 Mathematics and transforms for advanced graphics \\
                 High-performance graphics and animation \\
                 Business graphics \\
                 Foreign and domestic television data \\
                 Graphics on the Apple II microcomputer \\
                 Graphics on the IBM personal computer",
}

@Book{Arvo:1991:GGI,
  author =       "James Arvo",
  title =        "Graphics gems {II}",
  volume =       "2",
  publisher =    pub-ACADEMIC,
  address =      pub-ACADEMIC:adr,
  pages =        "xxxii + 643",
  year =         "1991",
  ISBN =         "0-12-064480-0",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-12-064480-3",
  LCCN =         "T385 .G6972 1991",
  bibdate =      "Mon Aug 24 17:12:23 1998",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/fparith.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  series =       "Graphics Gems",
  URL =          "http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/book/9780080507545",
  ZMnumber =     "0774.68010",
  abstract =     "\booktitle{Graphics Gems II} is a collection of
                 articles shared by a diverse group of people that
                 reflect ideas and approaches in graphics programming
                 which can benefit other computer graphics programmers.
                 This volume presents techniques for doing well-known
                 graphics operations faster or easier. The book contains
                 chapters devoted to topics on two-dimensional and
                 three-dimensional geometry and algorithms, image
                 processing, frame buffer techniques, and ray tracing
                 techniques. The radiosity approach, matrix techniques,
                 and numerical and programming techniques are likewise
                 discussed.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  libnote =      "Not yet in my library.",
  tableofcontents = "Foreword / Andrew Glassner \\
                 The Area of a Simple Polygon / Jon Rokne \\
                 Intersection of Line Segments / Mukesh Prasad \\
                 Distance from a Point to a Line / Jack C. Morrison \\
                 An Easy Bounding Circle / Jon Rokne \\
                 The Smallest Circle Containing the Intersection of Two
                 Circles / Jon Rokne \\
                 Appolonius's 10th Problem / Jon Rokne \\
                 A Peano Curve Generation Algorithm / Ken Musgrave \\
                 Space-Filling Curves and a Measure of Coherence /
                 Douglas Voorhies \\
                 Scanline Coherent Shape Algebra / Jonathan E. Steinhart
                 \\
                 Image Smoothing and Sharpening by Discrete Convolution
                 / Dale A. Schumacher \\
                 A Comparison of Digital Halftoning Techniques / Dale A.
                 Schumacher \\
                 Color Dithering / Spencer W. Thomas and Rod G. Bogart
                 \\
                 Fast Anamorphic Image Scaling / Dale A. Schumacher \\
                 Real Pixels / Greg Ward \\
                 A Fast 90-Degree Bitmap Rotator / Sue-Ken Yap \\
                 Rotation of Run-Length Encoded Image Data / Jeff Holt
                 \\
                 Adaptive Run-Length Encoding / Andrew S. Glassner \\
                 Image File Compression Made Easy / Alan W. Paeth \\
                 An Optimal Filter for Image Reconstruction / Nelson Max
                 \\
                 Noise Thresholding in Edge Images / John Schlag \\
                 Computing the Area, the Circumference, and the Genus of
                 a Binary Digital Image / Hanspeter Bieri and Andreas
                 Kohler \\
                 Efficient Inverse Color Map Computation / Spencer W.
                 Thomas \\
                 Efficient Statistical Computations for Optimal Color
                 Quantization / Xiaolin Wu \\
                 A Random Color Map Animation Algorithm / Ken Musgrave
                 \\
                 A Fast Approach to PHIGS PLUS Pseudo Color Mapping /
                 James Hall and Terence Lindgren \\
                 Mapping RGB Triples onto 16 Distinct Values / Alan W.
                 Paeth \\
                 Television Color Encoding and ``Hot'' Broadcast Colors
                 / David Martindale and Alan W. Paeth \\
                 An Inexpensive Method of Setting the Monitor White
                 Point / Gary W. Meyer \\
                 Some Tips for Making Color Hardcopy / Ken Musgrave \\
                 Area of Planar Polygons and Volume of Polyhedra /
                 Ronald N. Goldman \\
                 Getting Around on a Sphere / Clifford A. Shaffer \\
                 Exact Dihedral Metrics for Common Polyhedra / Alan W.
                 Paeth \\
                 A Simple Viewing Geometry / Andrew S. Glassner \\
                 View Correlation / Rod G. Bogart \\
                 Maintaining Winged-Edge Models / Andrew S. Glassner \\
                 Quadtree\slash Octree-to-Boundary Conversion / Claudio
                 Montani and Roberto Scopigno \\
                 Three-Dimensional Homogeneous Clipping of Triangle
                 Strips / Patrick-Gilles Maillot \\
                 InterPhong Shading / Nadia Magnenat Thalmann, Daniel
                 Thalmann and Hong Tong Minh \\
                 Fast Ray-Convex Polyhedron Intersection / Eric Haines
                 \\
                 Intersecting a Ray with an Elliptical Torus / Joseph M.
                 Cychosz \\
                 Ray-Triangle Intersection Using Binary Recursive
                 Subdivision / Douglas Voorhies and David Kirk \\
                 Improved Ray Tagging for Voxel-Based Ray Tracing /
                 David Kirk and James Arvo \\
                 Efficiency Improvements for Hierarchy Traversal in Ray
                 Tracing / Eric Haines \\
                 A Recursive Shadow Voxel Cache for Ray Tracing / Andrew
                 Pearce \\
                 Avoiding Incorrect Shadow Intersections for Ray Tracing
                 / Andrew Pearce \\
                 A Body Color Model: Absorption of Light through
                 Translucent Media / Mark E. Lee and Samuel P. Uselton
                 \\
                 More Shadow Attenuation for Ray Tracing Transparent or
                 Translucent Objects / Mark E. Lee and Samuel P. Uselton
                 \\
                 Implementing Progressive Radiosity with User-Provided
                 Polygon Display Routines / Shenchang Eric Chen \\
                 A Cubic Tetrahedral Adaptation of the Hemi-Cube
                 Algorithm / Jeffrey C. Beran-Koehn and Mark J. Pavicic
                 \\
                 Fast Vertex Radiosity Update / Filippo Tampieri \\
                 Radiosity via Ray Tracing / Peter Shirley \\
                 Detection of Shadow Boundaries for Adaptive Meshing in
                 Radiosity / Fran{\c{c}}ois Sillion \\
                 Decomposing a Matrix into Simple Transformations /
                 Spencer W. Thomas \\
                 Recovering the Data from the Transformation Matrix /
                 Ronald N. Goldman \\
                 Transformations as Exponentials / Ronald N. Goldman \\
                 More Matrices and Transformations: Shear and
                 Pseudo-Perspective / Ronald N. Goldman \\
                 Fast Matrix Inversion / Kevin Wu \\
                 Quaternions and $4 \times 4$ Matrices / Ken Shoemake
                 \\
                 Random Rotation Matrices / James Arvo \\
                 Classifying Small Sparse Matrices / James Arvo \\
                 Bit Picking / Ken Shoemake \\
                 Faster Fourier Transform / Ken Shoemake \\
                 Of Integers, Fields, and Bit Counting / Alan W. Paeth
                 and David Schilling \\
                 Using Geometric Constructions to Interpolate
                 Orientation with Quaternions / John Schlag \\
                 A Half-Angle Identity for Digital Computation: The Joys
                 of the Halved Tangent / Alan W. Paeth \\
                 An Integer Square Root Algorithm / Christopher J.
                 Musial \\
                 Fast Approximation to the Arctangent / Ron Capelli \\
                 Fast Sign of Cross Product Calculation / Jack Ritter
                 \\
                 Interval Sampling / Ken Shoemake \\
                 A Recursive Implementation of the Perlin Noise Function
                 / Greg Ward \\
                 Least-Squares Approximations to B{\'e}zier Curves and
                 Surfaces / Doug Moore and Joe Warren \\
                 Beyond B{\'e}zier Curves / Ken Shoemake \\
                 A Simple Formulation for Curve Interpolation with
                 Variable Control Point Approximation / John Schlag \\
                 Symmetric Evaluation of Polynomials / Terence Lindgren
                 \\
                 Menelaus's Theorem / Hans-Peter Seidel \\
                 Geometrically Continuous Cubic B{\'e}zier Curves /
                 Hans-Peter Siedel \\
                 A Good Straight-Line Approximation of a Circular Arc /
                 Christopher J. Musial \\
                 Great Circle Plotting / Alan W. Paeth \\
                 Fast Anti-Aliased Circle Generation / Xiaolin Wu \\
                 Graphics Gems C Header File \\
                 2D and 3D Vector C Library \\
                 Corrected and Indexed \\
                 Useful C Macros for Vector Operations / Steve
                 Hollasch",
  xxtableofcontents = "Foreword \\
                 Preface \\
                 Mathematical Notation \\
                 Pseudo-Code \\
                 Contributors \\
                 I: 2D Geometry and Algorithms \\
                 Introduction \\
                 1: The Area of a Simple Polygon \\
                 2: Intersection of Line Segments \\
                 3: Distance from a Point to a Line \\
                 4: An Easy Bounding Circle \\
                 5: The Smallest Circle Containing the Intersection of
                 Two Circles \\
                 6: Appolonius's 10th Problem \\
                 7: A Peano Curve Generation Algorithm \\
                 8: Space-Filling Curves and a Measure of Coherence \\
                 9: Scanline Coherent Shape Algebra \\
                 II: Image Processing \\
                 Introduction \\
                 1: Image Smoothing and Sharpening by Discrete
                 Convolution \\
                 2: A Comparison of Digital Halftoning Techniques \\
                 3: Color Dithering \\
                 4: Fast Anamorphic Image Scaling \\
                 5: Real Pixels \\
                 6: A Fast 90-Degree Bitmap Rotator \\
                 7: Rotation of Run-Length Encoded Image Data \\
                 8: Adaptive Run-Length Encoding \\
                 9: Image File Compression Made Easy \\
                 10: An Optimal Filter for Image Reconstruction \\
                 11: Noise Thresholding in Edge Images \\
                 12: Computing the Area, the Circumference, and the
                 Genus of a Binary Digital Image \\
                 III: Frame Buffer Techniques \\
                 Introduction \\
                 1: Efficient Inverse Color Map Computation \\
                 2. Efficient Statistical Computations for Optimal Color
                 Quantization \\
                 3: A Random Color Map Animation Algorithm \\
                 4: A Fast Approach to PHIGS PLUS Pseudo Color Mapping
                 \\
                 5: Mapping RGB Triples onto 16 Distinct Values \\
                 6: Television Color Encoding and ``Hot'' Broadcast
                 Colors \\
                 7: An Inexpensive Method of Setting the Monitor White
                 Point \\
                 8: Some Tips for Making Color Hardcopy \\
                 IV: 3D Geometry and Algorithms \\
                 Introduction \\
                 1: Area of Planar Polygons and Volume of Polyhedra \\
                 2: Getting Around on a Sphere \\
                 3: Exact Dihedral Metrics for Common Polyhedra \\
                 4: A Simple Viewing Geometry \\
                 5: View Correlation \\
                 6: Maintaining Winged-Edge Models \\
                 7: Quadtree\slash Octree-to-Boundary Conversion \\
                 8: Three-Dimensional Homogeneous Clipping of Triangle
                 Strips \\
                 9: InterPhong Shading \\
                 V: Ray Tracing \\
                 Introduction \\
                 1: Fast Ray-Convex Polyhedron Intersection \\
                 2: Intersecting a Ray with an Elliptical Torus \\
                 3: Ray-Triangle Intersection Using Binary Recursive
                 Subdivision \\
                 4: Improved Ray Tagging for Voxel-Based Ray Tracing \\
                 5: Efficiency Improvements for Hierarchy Traversal in
                 Ray Tracing \\
                 6: A Recursive Shadow Voxel Cache for Ray Tracing \\
                 7: Avoiding Incorrect Shadow Intersections for Ray
                 Tracing \\
                 8: A Body Color Model: Absorption of Light through
                 Translucent Media \\
                 9: More Shadow Attenuation for Ray Tracing Transparent
                 or Translucent Objects \\
                 VI: Radiosity \\
                 Introduction \\
                 1: Implementing Progressive Radiosity with
                 User-Provided Polygon Display Routines \\
                 2: A Cubic Tetrahedral Adaptation of the Hemi-Cube
                 Algorithm \\
                 3: Fast Vertex Radiosity Update \\
                 4: Radiosity via Ray Tracing \\
                 5: Detection of Shadow Boundaries for Adaptive Meshing
                 in Radiosity \\
                 [data unavailable] \ldots{}",
}

@Book{Asente:1990:XWS,
  author =       "Paul J. Asente and Ralph R. Swick",
  title =        "{X Window System Toolkit}: The Complete Programmer's
                 Guide and Specification",
  publisher =    pub-DP,
  address =      pub-DP:adr,
  pages =        "xxxv + 967",
  year =         "1990",
  ISBN =         "0-13-972191-6 (Prentice Hall), 0-13-973173-3,
                 0-13-975491-6 (Prentice Hall), 1-55558-051-3 (DP
                 paperback)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-13-972191-5 (Prentice Hall), 978-0-13-973173-0,
                 978-0-13-975491-3 (Prentice Hall), 978-1-55558-051-3
                 (DP paperback)",
  LCCN =         "QA76.76.W56 A74 1990",
  MRclass =      "68-00, 68N25",
  bibdate =      "Tue Dec 14 22:40:01 1993",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/unix.bib",
  ZMnumber =     "0771.68002",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Article{Asher:virtual-fonts,
  author =       "Graham Asher",
  title =        "Re: Virtual fonts: More fun for Grand Wizards",
  journal =      j-TEXHAX,
  volume =       "90",
  number =       "17",
  month =        jan,
  year =         "1990",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Aste:2000:PPP,
  author =       "Tomaso Aste and Denis Weaire",
  title =        "The Pursuit of Perfect Packing",
  publisher =    pub-IOP,
  address =      pub-IOP:adr,
  pages =        "xi + 136",
  year =         "2000",
  DOI =          "https://doi.org/10.1887/0750306483",
  ISBN =         "0-7503-0647-5 (hardcover), 0-7503-0648-3 (paperback)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-7503-0647-8 (hardcover), 978-0-7503-0648-5
                 (paperback)",
  LCCN =         "QA166.7 .A78 2000",
  MRclass =      "52-01 (52A40 52C15 52C17 52C23)",
  MRnumber =     "1786410 (2001g:52001)",
  MRreviewer =   "Johann Linhart",
  bibdate =      "Tue Mar 13 11:03:37 2001",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/kepler.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  abstract =     "\booktitle{The Pursuit of Perfect Packing} explores
                 the densest possible arrangement of identical spheres
                 and many others problems that have to do with packing
                 things together. The examples from mathematics,
                 physics, biology, and engineering include the
                 arrangement of soap bubbles in foam, atoms in a
                 crystal, the architecture of the bee's honeycomb, and
                 the structure of the Giant's Causeway. The book also
                 contains brief accounts of the lives of many of the
                 scientists who devoted themselves to problems of
                 packing over many centuries, together with wry comments
                 on their efforts. It is an entertaining introduction to
                 the field for both specialists and the more general
                 public.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  keywords =     "Hilbert's 18th Problem (How can one arrange most
                 densely in space an infinite number of equal solids of
                 given form, so that the ratio of the filled to the
                 unfilled space may be as great as possible?); Kepler
                 sphere-packing conjecture; Malfatti problem; Mallet's
                 model; Thomas Hales' packing-proof programme; Thomson
                 problem; Tammes problem; Vorono{\"\i} construction",
  libnote =      "Not in my library.",
  remark =       "This is an interesting little monograph on packing
                 problems, a surprising number of which continue to
                 elude proofs and solutions. Packing problems are
                 considered in two-, three-, and higher dimensions, for
                 bubbles, casks of Guinness, concrete, spheres, foam,
                 soap film, \ldots{}.",
  tableofcontents = "1: How many sweets in the jar? \\
                 2: Loose change and tight packing \\
                 3: Hard Problems with hard spheres \\
                 4: Proof positive? \\
                 5: Peas and Pips \\
                 6: Enthusiastic admiration: the honeycomb \\
                 7: Toils and troubles with bubbles \\
                 8: The architecture of the world of atoms \\
                 9: Apollonius and concrete \\
                 10: The Giants Causeway \\
                 11: Soccer balls, golf balls, and Bucky balls \\
                 12: Packings and kisses in high dimensions \\
                 13: Odds and ends \\
                 14: Conclusion",
}

@Manual{ASTM:1970:CPT,
  title =        "{CODEN} for Periodical Titles (Including
                 Non-Periodical Titles and Deleted {CODEN}): An aid to
                 the storage and retrieval of information and to
                 communication involving journal references",
  organization = "American Society for Testing and Materials",
  address =      "1916 Race St., Philadelphia, PA 19103, USA",
  edition =      "Third",
  year =         "1970",
  bibdate =      "Thu Apr 25 07:55:21 1996",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  note =         "ASTM Data Series DS 23 B. Two volumes. Includes CODEN
                 values for 102,146 periodical titles and 7,361
                 non-periodical publications.",
  price =        "US\$215.00",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  libnote =      "Not in my library.",
}

@TechReport{Atanasoff:1940:CMS,
  author =       "J. V. Atanasoff",
  title =        "Computing machine for the solution of large systems of
                 linear algebraic equations",
  type =         "Unpublished memorandum",
  institution =  "Iowa State College",
  address =      "Ames, IA, USA",
  month =        aug,
  year =         "1940",
  bibdate =      "Wed Oct 13 11:36:11 2010",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  note =         "Reprinted in \cite[\S 7.2]{Randell:1982:ODC}.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Atkins:1970:TGT,
  author =       "P. W. (Peter William) Atkins and M. S. Child and C. S.
                 G. (Courtenay Stanley Goss) Phillips",
  title =        "Tables for Group Theory",
  publisher =    pub-OXFORD,
  address =      pub-OXFORD:adr,
  pages =        "32",
  year =         "1970",
  ISBN =         "0-19-855131-2",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-19-855131-7",
  LCCN =         "QA171 .A851",
  bibdate =      "Mon Jul 27 07:06:06 1998",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{ATT:AUS86-1,
  author =       "AT{\&T}",
  key =          "ATT",
  title =        "{AT}{{\&T UNIX}} System Readings and Applications",
  volume =       "I",
  publisher =    pub-PH,
  address =      pub-PH:adr,
  pages =        "xiv + 397",
  year =         "1986",
  ISBN =         "0-13-938532-0",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-13-938532-2",
  LCCN =         "QA76.76.O63 U553 1986",
  bibdate =      "Sat Oct 28 08:25:56 2000",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  xxnote =       "NB: special form AT{\&T} required to get correct
                 alpha-style labels.",
}

@Book{ATT:AUS86-2,
  author =       "AT{\&T}",
  key =          "ATT",
  title =        "{AT}{{\&T UNIX}} System Readings and Applications",
  volume =       "II",
  publisher =    pub-PH,
  address =      pub-PH:adr,
  pages =        "xii + 324",
  year =         "1986",
  ISBN =         "0-13-939845-7",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-13-939845-2",
  LCCN =         "QA76.76.O63 U553 1986",
  bibdate =      "Sat Oct 28 08:25:58 2000",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  xxnote =       "NB: special form AT{\&T} required to get correct
                 alpha-style labels.",
}

@Book{ATT:UPM83-1,
  author =       "AT{\&T}",
  key =          "ATT",
  title =        "{UNIX} Programmer's Manual",
  volume =       "1",
  publisher =    pub-HRW,
  address =      pub-HRW:adr,
  pages =        "xiv + 425",
  year =         "1983",
  ISBN =         "0-03-061742-1",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-03-061742-3",
  LCCN =         "QA76.8.U65 B44 1983",
  bibdate =      "Sat Oct 28 08:26:00 2000",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  xxnote =       "NB: special form AT{\&T} required to get correct
                 alpha-style labels.",
}

@Book{ATT:UPM83-2,
  author =       "AT{\&T}",
  key =          "ATT",
  title =        "{UNIX} Programmer's Manual",
  volume =       "2",
  publisher =    pub-HRW,
  address =      pub-HRW:adr,
  pages =        "vii + 616",
  year =         "1983",
  ISBN =         "0-03-061743-X",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-03-061743-0",
  LCCN =         "QA76.8.U65 B44 1983",
  bibdate =      "Sat Oct 28 08:26:02 2000",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  xxnote =       "NB: special form AT{\&T} required to get correct
                 alpha-style labels.",
}

@Book{ATT:UPM86-1,
  author =       "AT{\&T}",
  key =          "ATT",
  title =        "{UNIX Programmer}'s {Manual}: {Commands} and
                 {Utilities}",
  volume =       "1",
  publisher =    pub-HRW,
  address =      pub-HRW:adr,
  pages =        "xxix + 524",
  year =         "1986",
  ISBN =         "0-03-009317-1",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-03-009317-3",
  LCCN =         "QA76.76.O63 U548 1986",
  bibdate =      "Sat Oct 28 08:26:04 2000",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  xxnote =       "NB: special form AT{\&T} required to get correct
                 alpha-style labels.",
}

@Book{ATT:UPM86-2,
  author =       "AT{\&T}",
  key =          "ATT",
  title =        "{UNIX Programmer}'s {Manual}: {System Calls} and
                 {Library Routines}",
  volume =       "2",
  publisher =    pub-HRW,
  address =      pub-HRW:adr,
  pages =        "xxxv + 465",
  year =         "1986",
  ISBN =         "0-03-009314-7",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-03-009314-2",
  LCCN =         "QA76.76.O63 U548 1986",
  bibdate =      "Sat Oct 28 08:26:05 2000",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{ATT:UPM86-3,
  author =       "AT{\&T}",
  key =          "ATT",
  title =        "{UNIX Programmer}'s {Manual}: {System} {Administration
                 Facilities}",
  volume =       "3",
  publisher =    pub-HRW,
  address =      pub-HRW:adr,
  pages =        "xiv + 142",
  year =         "1986",
  ISBN =         "0-03-009313-9",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-03-009313-5",
  LCCN =         "QA76.76.O63 U548 1986",
  bibdate =      "Sat Oct 28 08:26:07 2000",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  xxnote =       "NB: special form AT{\&T} required to get correct
                 alpha-style labels.",
}

@Book{ATT:UPM86-4,
  author =       "AT{\&T}",
  key =          "ATT",
  title =        "{UNIX Programmer}'s {Manual}: {Document}
                 {Preparation}",
  volume =       "4",
  publisher =    pub-HRW,
  address =      pub-HRW:adr,
  pages =        "xiii + 355",
  year =         "1986",
  ISBN =         "0-03-011207-9",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-03-011207-2",
  LCCN =         "QA76.76.O63 U548 1986",
  bibdate =      "Sat Oct 28 08:26:08 2000",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  xxnote =       "NB: special form AT{\&T} required to get correct
                 alpha-style labels.",
}

@Book{ATT:UPM86-5,
  author =       "AT{\&T}",
  key =          "ATT",
  title =        "{UNIX Programmer}'s {Manual}: {Languages} and {Support
                 Tools}",
  volume =       "5",
  publisher =    pub-HRW,
  address =      pub-HRW:adr,
  pages =        "xviii + 618",
  year =         "1986",
  ISBN =         "0-03-011204-4",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-03-011204-1",
  LCCN =         "QA76.76.O63 U548 1986",
  bibdate =      "Sat Oct 28 08:26:09 2000",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  xxnote =       "NB: special form AT{\&T} required to get correct
                 alpha-style labels.",
}

@Book{ATT:USV86,
  author =       "AT{\&T}",
  key =          "ATT",
  title =        "{UNIX System V Programmer}'s {Guide}",
  publisher =    pub-HRW,
  address =      pub-HRW:adr,
  pages =        "xiv + 832",
  year =         "1986",
  ISBN =         "0-13-940438-4",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-13-940438-2",
  LCCN =         "QA76.76.O63 U556 1987",
  bibdate =      "Sat Oct 28 08:26:11 2000",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  xxnote =       "NB: special form AT{\&T} required to get correct
                 alpha-style labels.",
}

@Book{Augarten:1984:BBI,
  author =       "Stan Augarten",
  title =        "{BIT} by {BIT}: An Illustrated History of Computers",
  publisher =    pub-TICKNOR-FIELDS,
  address =      pub-TICKNOR-FIELDS:adr,
  pages =        "ix + 324",
  year =         "1984",
  ISBN =         "0-89919-268-8, 0-89919-302-1 (paperback)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-89919-268-0, 978-0-89919-302-1 (paperback)",
  LCCN =         "QA76.17.A94 1984",
  bibdate =      "Thu Sep 15 07:53:57 1994",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  abstract =     "Tells the story of the development of computers, plus
                 the men and women who shaped its history.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  libnote =      "Not yet in my library.",
  tableofcontents = "The first mechanical calculators \\
                 The engines of Charles Babbage \\
                 The bridge between two centuries \\
                 The invention of ENIAC \\
                 The stored-program computer \\
                 The rise of IBM \\
                 The Whirlwind Project \\
                 The integrated circuit \\
                 The personal computer \\
                 Epilogue: the lesson of history \\
                 Appendix: the FBI dossier of John William Mauchly \\
                 Chronology of the history of computers",
}

@Book{Austern:1999:GPS,
  author =       "Matthew H. Austern",
  title =        "Generic Programming and the {STL}: Using and Extending
                 the {C++ Standard Template} Library",
  publisher =    pub-AW,
  address =      pub-AW:adr,
  pages =        "xx + 548",
  year =         "1999",
  ISBN =         "0-201-30956-4",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-201-30956-0",
  LCCN =         "QA76.73.C153A97 1999",
  bibdate =      "Tue May 11 07:00:39 1999",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  price =        "US\$49.95",
  series =       "Addison-Wesley professional computing series",
  abstract =     "This guide explains the C++ Standard Template Library
                 (STL) in terms of generic programming--a way of
                 designing and writing programs so that they can easily
                 be reused. The fundamental premise is that the STL
                 should be regarded as a library of concepts, rather
                 than as a library of functions and classes.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  libnote =      "Not in my library.",
  tableofcontents = "Part I: Introduction to Generic Programming \\
                 1: A Tour of the STL \\
                 2: Algorithms and Ranges \\
                 3: More about Iterators \\
                 4: Function Objects \\
                 5: Containers \\
                 Part II: Reference Manual: STL Concepts \\
                 6: Basic Concepts \\
                 7: Iterators \\
                 8: Function Objects \\
                 9: Containers \\
                 Part III: Reference Manual: Algorithms and Classes \\
                 10: Basic Components \\
                 11: Nonmutating Algorithms \\
                 12: Basic Mutating Algorithms \\
                 13: Sorting and Searching \\
                 14: Iterator Classes \\
                 15: Function Object Classes \\
                 16: Container Classes \\
                 Appendix A: Portability and Standardization",
}

@Article{Avenarius:fortran-web,
  author =       "Adrian Avenarius and Siegfried Oppermann",
  title =        "{\FWEB}: a Literate Programming System for {Fortran
                 8X}",
  journal =      j-SIGPLAN,
  volume =       "25",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "52--58",
  month =        jan,
  year =         "1990",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Avery:1976:CAO,
  author =       "John Avery",
  title =        "Creation and Annihilation Operators",
  publisher =    "McGraw-Hill International Book Company",
  address =      "New York, NY, USA",
  pages =        "xii + 221",
  year =         "1976",
  ISBN =         "0-07-002504-5",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-07-002504-2",
  LCCN =         "QC174.52.06A9",
  bibdate =      "Sat Jul 25 13:55:27 1998",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/bibnet/authors/d/dirac-p-a-m.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/bibnet/authors/d/dyson-freeman-j.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/bibnet/authors/f/feynman-richard-p.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/bibnet/authors/s/slater-john-clarke.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  shorttableofcontents = "1: Boson operators \\
                 2: Fermion operators \\
                 3: A second-quantized formulation of Russell--Saunders
                 coupling and crystal field theory \\
                 4: Group theoretical properties of electron creation
                 and annihilation operators \\
                 5: An introduction to quantum electrodynamics \\
                 6: Many-body perturbation theory \\
                 Appendix A: The Bogoliubov--Tyablikov transformation
                 for diagonalizing a quadratic boson Hamiltonian / 139
                 \\
                 Appendix B: The Dirac equation / 145 \\
                 Appendix C: Solutions to the problems / 169 \\
                 Bibliography and References / 213 \\
                 Index / 217",
  tableofcontents = "1: Boson operators \\
                 1.1 A simple harmonic oscillator treated by means of
                 commutation relations / 1 \\
                 1.2 Phonon creation and annihilation operators / 3 \\
                 1.3 A collection of harmonic oscillators / 5 \\
                 1.4 Small vibrations of a classical system about its
                 equilibrium position; Transformation to normal
                 coordinates / 6 \\
                 1.5 Vibrational normal modes of a crystal lattice / 8
                 \\
                 1.6 A one-dimensional example; Optical and acoustic
                 vibrational modes / 11 \\
                 1.7 The Lagrangian density of a continuous system / 15
                 \\
                 1.8 Motion of a vibrating string / 17 \\
                 1.9 A vibrating string treated as a chain of
                 elastically joined point masses; The cut-off frequency
                 / 22 \\
                 2: Fermion operators \\
                 2.1 Antisymmetric many-electron wave functions; Slater
                 determinants / 27 \\
                 2.2 Electron creation and annihilation operators / 30
                 \\
                 2.3 One-electron and two-electron operators; Derivation
                 of the Slater--Condon rules / 32 \\
                 2.4 Commutation rules for one- and two -electron
                 operators / 37 \\
                 2.5 Koopmans' theorem / 38 \\
                 2.6 The Hartree--Fock equations / 38 \\
                 2.7 Excitations from the Hartree--Fock ground state;
                 The random phase approximation / 41 \\
                 2.8 Calculation of transition dipole moments in the
                 random phase approximation / 45 \\
                 2.9 Calculation of the ground state correlation
                 coefficients in the random phase approximation / 47 \\
                 3: A second-quantized formulation of Russell--Saunders
                 coupling and crystal field theory \\
                 3.1 Commutation rules for spin / 51 \\
                 3.2 Commutation rules for orbital angular momentum / 53
                 \\
                 3.3 Commutation rules for the spin-orbit coupling
                 operator / 56 \\
                 3.4 The effect of a crystal field / 57 \\
                 3.5 An example of crystal field splitting: the $^4F$
                 and $^4P$ $d^3$ multiplets in tetrahedral and
                 octahedral fields / 60 \\
                 3.6 External magnetic fields / 68 \\
                 4: Group theoretical properties of electron creation
                 and annihilation operators \\
                 4.1 Transformation properties of electron creation and
                 annihilation operators under elements of a symmetry
                 group / 71 \\
                 4.2 Group theoretical projection operators / 72 \\
                 4.3 Time reversal / 74 \\
                 4.4 Kramers' theorem; Time-reversal degeneracy / 76 \\
                 4.5 Kramers pairs / 76 \\
                 4.6 The Kramers pair creation operator / 78 \\
                 4.7 Invariance of $B\dagger$ under the symmetry group
                 of the Hamiltonian / 79 \\
                 4.8 The seniority quantum number / 82 \\
                 4.9 Energy of Russell--Saunders terms in atoms;
                 Slater--Condon and Racah parameters / 86 \\
                 4.10 Configuration interaction; Calculation of
                 correlation energy using Kramers pair creation and
                 annihilation operators / 88 \\
                 4.11 Cooper pairs in superconductivity theory / 91 \\
                 4.12 Commutation relations for Kramers pair creation
                 and annihilation operators / 92 \\
                 4.13 Normalization of daughter states / 93 \\
                 5: An introduction to quantum electrodynamics \\
                 5.1 Quantization of the electromagnetic potentials / 97
                 \\
                 5.2 Separation of the longitudinal and transverse
                 potentials; The approximate Hamiltonian of the
                 electron-photon system / 103 \\
                 5.3 Linear polarization and circular polarization of
                 photons / 106 \\
                 5.4 Spontaneous photon emission / 108 \\
                 5.5 Photon absorption / 110 \\
                 5.6 Angular correlations in the photoelectric effect /
                 112 \\
                 5.7 Photon scattering and dispersion; Feynman diagrams
                 / 115 \\
                 5.8 Optical activity / 120 \\
                 6: Many-body perturbation theory \\
                 6.1 The Feynman--Dyson form of perturbation theory; The
                 interaction representation; Chronological products /
                 123 \\
                 6.2 Time-dependent anticommutation relations; Hole
                 creation and annihilation operators / 126 \\
                 6.3 Normal products; Contractions; Wick's theorem / 129
                 \\
                 6.4 The adiabatic hypothesis; Level shifts / 132 \\
                 6.5 Feynman diagrams representing perturbations of the
                 ground state; The linked cluster theorem / 133 \\
                 Appendix A: The Bogoliubov--Tyablikov transformation
                 for diagonalizing a quadratic boson Hamiltonian / 139
                 \\
                 Appendix B: The Dirac equation / 145 \\
                 Appendix C: Solutions to the problems / 169 \\
                 Bibliography and References / 213 \\
                 Index / 217",
}

@Unpublished{Babbage:1837:MPC,
  author =       "Charles Babbage",
  title =        "On the mathematical powers of the calculating engine",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "1837",
  bibdate =      "Wed Oct 13 11:09:59 2010",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  note =         "Manuscript held by Museum of the History of Science,
                 Oxford, UK. Reprinted in \cite[\S
                 2.1]{Randell:1982:ODC}.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Article{Babbage:1910:BBA,
  author =       "H. P. Babbage",
  title =        "{Babbage}: {Babbage}'s analytical engine",
  journal =      j-MONTHLY-NOT-ROY-ASTRON-SOC,
  volume =       "70",
  number =       "??",
  pages =        "517--526, 645",
  year =         "1910",
  CODEN =        "MNRAA4",
  ISSN =         "0035-8711",
  bibdate =      "Wed Oct 13 11:12:08 2010",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  note =         "Reprinted in \cite[\S 2.3]{Randell:1982:ODC}.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  fjournal =     "Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society",
}

@Book{Bach:1986:DUO,
  author =       "Maurice J. Bach",
  title =        "The Design of the {UNIX} Operating System",
  publisher =    pub-PH,
  address =      pub-PH:adr,
  pages =        "xiv + 471",
  year =         "1986",
  ISBN =         "0-13-201799-7",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-13-201799-2",
  LCCN =         "QA76.76.O63 B33 1986",
  bibdate =      "Tue Dec 14 22:40:07 1993",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  tableofcontents = "General Overview of the System \\
                 History \\
                 System Structure \\
                 User Perspective \\
                 Operating System Services \\
                 Assumptions About Hardware \\
                 Introduction to the Kernel \\
                 Architecture of the UNIX Operating System \\
                 Introduction to System Concepts \\
                 Kernel Data Structures \\
                 System Administration \\
                 Summary and Preview \\
                 The Buffer Cache \\
                 Buffer Headers \\
                 Structure of the Buffer Pool \\
                 Scenarios for Retrieval of a Buffer \\
                 Reading and Writing Disk Blocks \\
                 Advantages and Disadvantages of the Buffer Cache \\
                 Internal Representation of Files \\
                 Inodes \\
                 Structure of a Regular File \\
                 Directories \\
                 Conversion of a Path Name to an Inode \\
                 Super Block \\
                 Inode Assignment to a New File \\
                 Allocation of Disk Blocks \\
                 Other File Types \\
                 System Calls for the File System \\
                 Open \\
                 Read \\
                 Write \\
                 File and Record Locking \\
                 Adjusting the Position of File I/O \\
                 LSEEK \\
                 Close \\
                 File Creation \\
                 Creation of Special Files \\
                 Change Directory and Change Root \\
                 Change Owner and Change Mode \\
                 STAT and FSTAT \\
                 Pipes \\
                 Dup \\
                 Mounting and Unmounting File Systems \\
                 Link \\
                 Unlink \\
                 File System Abstractions \\
                 File System Maintenance \\
                 The Structure of Processes \\
                 Process States and Transitions \\
                 Layout of System Memory \\
                 The Context of a Process \\
                 Saving the Context of a Process \\
                 Manipulation of the Process Address Space \\
                 Sleep \\
                 Process Control \\
                 Process Creation \\
                 Signals \\
                 Process Termination \\
                 Awaiting Process Termination \\
                 Invoking Other Programs \\
                 The User ID of a Process \\
                 Changing the Size of a Process \\
                 The Shell \\
                 System Boot and the INIT Process \\
                 Process Scheduling and Time \\
                 Process Scheduling \\
                 System Calls For Time \\
                 Clock \\
                 Memory Management Policies \\
                 Swapping \\
                 Demand Paging \\
                 A Hybrid System With Swapping and Demand Paging \\
                 The I/O Subsystem \\
                 Driver Interfaces \\
                 Disk Drivers \\
                 Terminal Drivers \\
                 Streams \\
                 Interprocess Communication \\
                 Process Tracing \\
                 System V IPC \\
                 Network Communications \\
                 Sockets \\
                 Multiprocessor Systems \\
                 Problem of Multiprocessor Systems \\
                 Solution With Master and Slave Processors \\
                 Solution With Semaphores \\
                 The Tunis System \\
                 Performance Limitations \\
                 Distributed Unix Systems \\
                 Satellite Processors \\
                 The Newcastle Connection \\
                 Transparent Distributed File Systems \\
                 A Transparent Distributed Model Without Stub Processes
                 \\
                 System Calls",
}

@Book{Backhouse:1979:SPL,
  author =       "Roland C. Backhouse",
  title =        "Syntax of Programming Language",
  publisher =    pub-PHI,
  address =      pub-PHI:adr,
  pages =        "xv + 301",
  year =         "1979",
  ISBN =         "0-13-879999-7",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-13-879999-1",
  LCCN =         "QA76.7 .B3",
  bibdate =      "Tue Dec 14 22:40:09 1993",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  price =        "US\$18.95",
  series =       "Series in Computer Science, Editor: C. A. R. Hoare",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Article{Backus:fortran-history,
  author =       "John Backus",
  title =        "The History of {FORTRAN I}, {II}, and {III}",
  journal =      j-SIGPLAN,
  volume =       "13",
  number =       "8",
  pages =        "165--180",
  month =        aug,
  year =         "1978",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Baer:1980:CSA,
  author =       "Jean-Loup Baer",
  title =        "Computer Systems Architecture",
  publisher =    pub-CSP,
  address =      pub-CSP:adr,
  pages =        "xiii + 626",
  year =         "1980",
  ISBN =         "0-914894-15-3",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-914894-15-5",
  LCCN =         "QA76.9.A73 B33",
  bibdate =      "Tue Dec 14 22:40:11 1993",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  tableofcontents = "An overview of the computer space \\
                 Historical survey of computer systems architecture \\
                 Description of computer systems \\
                 The building blocks and their interactions \\
                 Arithmetic algorithms \\
                 Powerful central processors \\
                 The memory hierarchy \\
                 Management of the memory hierarchy \\
                 The control unit and microprogramming \\
                 Input-output \\
                 Complete systems: from micros to supercomputers \\
                 From microprocessors to superminicomputers \\
                 Supercomputers \\
                 Future trends in computer systems architecture",
}

@Book{Baer:2010:MAS,
  author =       "Jean-Loup Baer",
  title =        "Microprocessor architecture: from simple pipelines to
                 chip multiprocessors",
  publisher =    pub-CAMBRIDGE,
  address =      pub-CAMBRIDGE:adr,
  pages =        "xiv + 367",
  year =         "2010",
  ISBN =         "0-521-76992-2 (hardcover)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-521-76992-1 (hardcover)",
  LCCN =         "QA76.5 .B227 2010",
  bibdate =      "Thu Sep 9 14:42:55 MDT 2010",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 z3950.loc.gov:7090/Voyager",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  libnote =      "Not in my library.",
  subject =      "Microprocessors; Computer architecture",
  tableofcontents = "Introduction \\
                 The basics \\
                 Superscalar processors \\
                 Front-end: branch predictio, instruction fetching, and
                 register renaming \\
                 Back-end: instruction scheduling, memory access
                 instructions, and clusters \\
                 The cache hierarchy \\
                 Multiprocessors \\
                 Multithreading and (chip) multiprocessing \\
                 Current limitations and future challenges",
}

@Article{Baeza-Yates:j-CACM-35-10-74,
  author =       "Ricardo Baeza-Yates and Gaston H. Gonnet",
  title =        "A New Approach to Text Searching",
  journal =      j-CACM,
  volume =       "35",
  number =       "10",
  pages =        "74--82",
  month =        oct,
  year =         "1992",
  bibdate =      "Sat Nov 7 11:35:45 1992",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  note =         "This paper describes a new linear-time string search
                 algorithm that can handle limited regular-expression
                 pattern matching {\em without\/} backtracking. See also
                 \cite{Knuth:string-search}, \cite{Boyer:string-search},
                 \cite{Karp:TR-31-81}, \cite{Sunday:string-search}, and
                 \cite{Wu:j-CACM-35-10-83}.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Baggott:2010:FWP,
  author =       "Jim Baggott",
  title =        "The {First War of Physics}: The Secret History of the
                 Atomic Bomb, 1939--1949",
  publisher =    "Pegasus Books",
  address =      "New York, NY, USA",
  pages =        "xiv + 576",
  year =         "2010",
  ISBN =         "1-60598-084-6",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-1-60598-084-3",
  LCCN =         "QC773 .B24 2010",
  bibdate =      "Thu Apr 15 08:14:32 2010",
  bibsource =    "fsz3950.oclc.org:210/WorldCat;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/einstein.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  URL =          "http://pegasusbooks.us/pdf/Spg10_Catalog.pdf",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  remark =       "Icon Press (UK) 2009 title: ``ATOMIC: The First War of
                 Physics and the Secret History of the Atom Bomb,
                 1939-1949''. Not yet in library catalogs
                 (15-Apr-2010).",
  tableofcontents = "List of illustrations / ix \\
                 Preface / xi \\
                 Prologue: Letter from Berlin / 1 \\
                 Part I: Mobilisation / 21 \\
                 1: The Uranverein / 23 \\
                 2: Element 94 / 41 \\
                 3: Critical Mass / 57 \\
                 4: A Visit to Copenhagen / 75 \\
                 5: Tube Alloys / 93 \\
                 Part II: Weapon / 115 \\
                 6: A Modest Request / 117 \\
                 7: The Italian Navigator / 137 \\
                 8: Los Alamos Ranch School / 159 \\
                 9: Enormoz [Cyrillic: Enormous] / 179 \\
                 10: Escape from Copenhagen / 199 \\
                 Part III: War / 221 \\
                 11: Uncle Nick / 223 \\
                 12: Mortal Crimes / 239 \\
                 13: Alsos and AZUSA / 259 \\
                 14: The Final Push / 279 \\
                 15: Trinity / 299 \\
                 16: Hypocentre / 319 \\
                 17: Operation Epsilon / 339 \\
                 Part IV: Proliferation / 357 \\
                 18: Dognat' i peregnat'! [Cyrillic: Catch up and
                 overtake] / 359 \\
                 19: Iron Curtain / 377 \\
                 20: Crossroads / 397 \\
                 21: Arzamas-16 / 417 \\
                 22: Joe-1 / 439 \\
                 Epilogue: Mutual Assured Destruction / 461 \\
                 Timeline / 493 \\
                 List of Key Characters / 515 \\
                 Notes and Sources / 535 \\
                 Bibliography / 553 \\
                 Index / 559",
}

@Book{Baggott:2011:QSH,
  author =       "Jim Baggott",
  title =        "The quantum story: a history in 40 moments",
  publisher =    pub-OXFORD,
  address =      pub-OXFORD:adr,
  pages =        "xix + 469 + 16",
  year =         "2011",
  ISBN =         "0-19-956684-4 (hardcover), 0-19-965597-9 (paperback)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-19-956684-6 (hardcover), 978-0-19-965597-7
                 (paperback)",
  LCCN =         "QC173.98 .B34 2011",
  bibdate =      "Sat Sep 17 16:37:46 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/bibnet/authors/b/bohr-niels.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/mathgaz2010.bib;
                 library.ox.ac.uk:210/ADVANCE;
                 z3950.loc.gov:7090/Voyager",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  subject =      "Quantum theory; History",
  tableofcontents = "Prologue: Stormclouds: London, April 1900 \\
                 Quantum of action: The most strenuous work of my life:
                 Berlin, December 1900 \\
                 Annus Mirabilis: Bern, March 1905 \\
                 A little bit of reality: Manchester, April 1913 \\
                 la Com\'edie Fran{\c{c}}aise: Paris, September 1923 \\
                 A strangely beautiful interior: Helgoland, June 1925
                 \\
                 The self-rotating electron: Leiden, November 1925 \\
                 A late erotic outburst: Swiss Alps, Christmas 1925 \\
                 Quantum interpretation: Ghost field: Oxford, August
                 1926 \\
                 All this damned quantum jumping: Copenhagen, October
                 1926 \\
                 The uncertainty principle: Copenhagen, February 1927
                 \\
                 The `Kopenhagener geist': Copenhagen, June 1927 \\
                 There is no quantum world: Lake Como, September 1927
                 \\
                 Quantum debate: The debate commences: Brussels, October
                 1927 \\
                 An absolute wonder: Cambridge, Christmas 1927 \\
                 The photon box: Brussels, October 1930 \\
                 A bolt from the blue: Princeton, May 1935 \\
                 The paradox of Schr{\"o}dinger's cat: Oxford, August
                 1935 \\
                 Interlude: The first war of physics: Christmas
                 1938-August 1945 \\
                 Quantum fields: Shelter Island: Long Island, June 1947
                 \\
                 Pictorial semi-vision thing: New York, January 1949 \\
                 A beautiful idea: Princeton, February 1954 \\
                 Some strangeness in the proportion: Rochester, August
                 1960 \\
                 Three quarks for Muster Mark!: New York, March 1963 \\
                 The `God particle': Cambridge, Massachusetts, Autumn
                 1967 \\
                 Quantum particles: Deep inelastic scattering: Stanford,
                 August 1968 \\
                 Of charm and weak neutral currents: Harvard, February
                 1970 \\
                 The magic of colour: Princeton/Harvard, April 1973 \\
                 The November revolution: Long Island/Stanford, November
                 1974 \\
                 Intermediate vector bosons: Geneva, January/June 1983
                 \\
                 The standard model: Geneva, September 2003 \\
                 Quantum reality: Hidden variable: Princeton, Spring
                 1951 \\
                 Bertlmann's socks: Boston, September 1964 \\
                 The Aspect experiments: Paris, September 1982 \\
                 The quantum eraser: Baltimore, January 1999 \\
                 Lab cats: Stony Brook/Delft, July 2000 \\
                 The persistent illusion: Vienna, December 2006 \\
                 Quantum cosmology: The wavefunction of the universe:
                 Princeton, July 1966 \\
                 Hawking radiation: Oxford, February 1974 \\
                 The first superstring revolution: Aspen, August 1984
                 \\
                 Quanta of space and time: Santa Barbara, February 1986
                 \\
                 Crisis? What crisis?: Durham, Summer 1994 \\
                 A quantum of solace?: Geneva, March 2010",
}

@InProceedings{Bailey:1992:MPS,
  author =       "David H. Bailey",
  booktitle =    "Proceedings Supercomputing '92",
  title =        "Misleading Performance in the Supercomputing Field",
  publisher =    pub-IEEE,
  address =      pub-IEEE:adr,
  pages =        "155--158",
  year =         "1992",
  ISBN =         "0-8186-2630-5, 0-89791-537-2",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-8186-2630-2, 978-0-89791-537-3",
  LCCN =         "QA76.5 S87a 1992",
  bibdate =      "Sat Feb 12 11:55:01 1994",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Bailey:2007:EMA,
  author =       "David H. Bailey and Jonathan M. Borwein and Neil J.
                 Calkin and Roland Girgensohn and D. Russell Luke and
                 Victor Moll",
  title =        "Experimental Mathematics in Action",
  publisher =    pub-A-K-PETERS,
  address =      pub-A-K-PETERS:adr,
  pages =        "xii + 322",
  year =         "2007",
  ISBN =         "1-56881-271-X",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-1-56881-271-7",
  LCCN =         "QA8.7 .E97 2007",
  bibdate =      "Thu Oct 25 18:45:59 MDT 2007",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/bibnet/authors/b/borwein-jonathan-m.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 z3950.loc.gov:7090/Voyager",
  URL =          "http://docserver.carma.newcastle.edu.au/1733/",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  subject =      "Experimental mathematics",
  tableofcontents = "Preface / xi \\
                 1 A Philosophical Introduction / 1 \\
                 1.1 Introduction / 1 \\
                 1.2 Mathematical Knowledge as We View It / 1 \\
                 1.3 Mathematical Reasoning / 2 \\
                 1.4 Philosophy of Experimental Mathematics / 3 \\
                 1.5 Our Experimental Mathodology / 11 \\
                 1.6 Finding Things versus Proving Things / 15 \\
                 1.7 Conclusions / 24 \\
                 2 Algorithms for Experimental Mathematics I / 29 \\
                 2.1 The Poetry of Computation / 29 \\
                 2.2 High-Precision Arithmetic / 30 \\
                 2.3 Integer Relation Detection / 31 \\
                 2.4 Illustrations and Examples / 33 \\
                 2.5 Definite Integrals and Infinite Series Summations /
                 43 \\
                 2.6 Computation of Multivariate Zeta Values / 44 \\
                 2.7 Ramanujan-Type Elliptic Series / 45 \\
                 3 Algorithms for Experimental Mathematics II / 53 \\
                 3.1 True Scientific Value / 53 \\
                 3.2 Prime Number Computations / 55 \\
                 3.3 Roots of Polynomials / 58 \\
                 3.4 Numerical Quadrature / 61 \\
                 3.5 Infinite Series Summation / 67 \\
                 3.6 Ap{\'e}ry-Like Summations / 70 \\
                 4 Exploration and Discovery in Inverse Scattering / 79
                 \\
                 4.1 Metaphysics and Mechanics / 79 \\
                 4.2 The Physical Experiment / 80 \\
                 4.3 The Model / 83 \\
                 4.4 The Mathematical Experiment: Qualitative Inverse
                 Scattering / 90 \\
                 4.5 Current Research / 107 \\
                 5 Exploring Strange Functions on the Computer / 113 \\
                 5.1 What Is ``Strange''? / 113 \\
                 5.2 Nowhere Differentiable Functions / 114 \\
                 5.3 Bernoulli Convolutions / 126 \\
                 6 Random Vectors and Factoring Integers: A Case Study /
                 139 \\
                 6.1 Learning from Experience / 139 \\
                 6.2 Integer Factorization / 140 \\
                 6.3 Random Models / 143 \\
                 6.4 The Main Questions / 144 \\
                 6.5 Bounds / 145 \\
                 6.6 Which Model Is Best? / 149 \\
                 6.7 Experimental Evidence / 155 \\
                 6.8 Conclusions / 158 \\
                 7 A Selection of Integrals from a Popular Table / 161
                 \\
                 7.1 The Allure of the Integral / 161 \\
                 7.2 The Project and Its Experimental Nature / 163 \\
                 7.3 Families and Individuals / 164 \\
                 7.4 An Experimental Derivation of Wallis' Formula / 167
                 \\
                 7.5 A Hyperbolic Example / 170 \\
                 7.6 A Formula Hidden in the List / 174 \\
                 7.7 Some Experiments on Valuations / 177 \\
                 7.8 An Error in the Latest Edition / 184 \\
                 7.9 Some Examples Involving the Hurwitz Zeta Function /
                 185 \\
                 8 Experimental Mathematics: A Computational Conclusion
                 / 189 \\
                 8.1 Mathematicians Are a Kind of Frenchmen / 189 \\
                 8.2 Putting Lessons in Action / 190 \\
                 8.3 Visual Computing / 191 \\
                 8.4 A Preliminary Example: Visualizing DNA Strands /
                 194 \\
                 8.5 What Is a Chaos Game? / 195 \\
                 8.6 Hilbert's Inequality and Witten's Zeta Function /
                 202 \\
                 8.7 Computational Challenge Problems / 214 \\
                 8.8 Last Words / 222 \\
                 9 Exercises / 225 \\
                 Exercises for Chapter 1 / 225 \\
                 Exercises for Chapter 2 / 231 \\
                 Exercises for Chapter 3 / 249 \\
                 Exercises for Chapter 4 / 256 \\
                 Exercises for Chapter 5 / 260 \\
                 Exercises for Chapter 6 / 262 \\
                 Exercises for Chapter 7 / 265 \\
                 Exercises for Chapter 8 / 273 \\
                 Additional Exercises / 280 \\
                 Bibliography / 301 \\
                 Index / 317",
}

@Article{Bailey:IJSA-5-3-63,
  author =       "D. H. Bailey and E. Barszcz and J. T. Barton and D. S.
                 Browning and R. L. Carter and L. Dagum and R. A.
                 Fatoohi and P. O. Frederickson and T. A. Lasinski and
                 R. S. Schreiber and H. D. Simon and V. Venkatakrishnan
                 and S. K. Weeratunga",
  title =        "The {NAS} Parallel Benchmarks",
  journal =      j-IJSAHPC,
  volume =       "5",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "63--73",
  month =        "Fall",
  year =         "1991",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Bain:1999:EEB,
  author =       "David Haward Bain",
  title =        "Empire Express: Building the First Transcontinental
                 Railroad",
  publisher =    pub-PENGUIN,
  address =      pub-PENGUIN:adr,
  pages =        "xiii + 797 + 32",
  year =         "1999",
  ISBN =         "0-670-80889-X, 0-14-008499-1",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-670-80889-2, 978-0-14-008499-3",
  LCCN =         "HE2751 .B24 1999",
  bibdate =      "Thu May 17 07:24:45 MDT 2018",
  bibsource =    "fsz3950.oclc.org:210/WorldCat;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  URL =          "http://books.google.com/books?isbn=067080889X;
                 http://lcweb.loc.gov/catdir/toc/99033375.html;
                 http://www.booknotes.org/Watch/155004-1/David+Haward+Bain.aspx",
  abstract =     "Chronicles the events that took place in the thirty
                 years it took to complete the first transcontinental
                 railroad, profiling the key players in its development,
                 the major setbacks the workers faced, and the public
                 objections to the railroad's completion.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  subject =      "Railroads; United States; History; Railroads;
                 Spoorwegen; History; Transcontinental railroad (United
                 States); West (U.S.); United States, West",
  tableofcontents = "Part I. 1845--57 \\
                 A procession of dreamers \\
                 ``For all the human family'' \\
                 ``Who can oppose such a work?'' \\
                 ``I must walk toward Oregon'' \\
                 ``The great object for which we were created'' \\
                 ``An uninhabited and dreary waste'' \\
                 Part II. 1860--61 \\
                 Union, disunion, incorporation \\
                 ``Raise the money and I will build your road'' \\
                 ``There comes crazy Judah'' \\
                 ``The marks left by the Donner Party'' \\
                 ``The most difficult country ever conceived'' \\
                 ``We have drawn the elephant'' \\
                 Part III. 1863 \\
                 Last of the dreamers \\
                 ``Speculation is as fatal to it as secession'' \\
                 ``I have had a big row and fight'' \\
                 Part IV. 1864 \\
                 Struggle for momentum \\
                 ``First dictator of the railroad world'' \\
                 ``Dancing with a whirlwind'' \\
                 ``Trustees of the bounty of Congress'' \\
                 Part V. 1865 \\
                 The losses mount \\
                 ``The great cloud darkening the land'' \\
                 ``If we can save our scalps'' \\
                 ``I hardly expect to live to see it completed'' \\
                 Part VI. 1866 \\
                 Eyeing the main chance \\
                 ``Vexation, trouble, and continual hindrance'' \\
                 ``The Napoleon of railways'' \\
                 ``We swarmed the mountains with men'' \\
                 ``Until they are severely punished'' \\
                 Part VII. 1867 \\
                 Hell on wheels \\
                 ``Nitroglycerine tells'' \\
                 ``Our future power and influence'' \\
                 ``They all died in their boots'' \\
                 ``There are only five of us'' \\
                 Part VIII. 1868 \\
                 Going for broke \\
                 ``More hungry men in Congress'' \\
                 ``Bring on your eight thousand men'' \\
                 ``We are in a terrible sweat'' \\
                 ``A man for breakfast every morning'' \\
                 Part IX. 1869 \\
                 Battleground and meeting ground \\
                 ``A resistless power'' \\
                 ``We have got done praying'' \\
                 Part X. 1872--73 \\
                 Scandals, scapegoats, and dodgers \\
                 Epilogue: ``Trial of the innocents.'' \\
                 Notes \\
                 Bibliography \\
                 Index",
}

@Book{Bak:1962:EIM,
  author =       "B{\o}rge Bak",
  title =        "Elementary Introduction to Molecular Spectra",
  publisher =    pub-NORTH-HOLLAND,
  address =      pub-NORTH-HOLLAND:adr,
  edition =      "Second",
  pages =        "xi + 144",
  year =         "1962",
  LCCN =         "QC451 .B2 1962",
  bibdate =      "Sat Jul 25 13:55:27 1998",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  xxISBN =       "none",
}

@Book{Bak:1966:VTG,
  author =       "Thor A. Bak and Jonas Lichtenberg",
  title =        "Vectors, Tensors, and Groups",
  volume =       "1",
  publisher =    pub-BENJAMIN,
  address =      pub-BENJAMIN:adr,
  year =         "1966",
  LCCN =         "QA37 .B35 1967",
  bibdate =      "Wed Dec 15 15:32:13 1993",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  series =       "Mathematics for Scientists",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  xxISBN =       "none",
}

@Book{Ball:1997:MMN,
  author =       "Philip Ball",
  title =        "Made to Measure: New Materials for the {21st
                 Century}",
  publisher =    pub-PRINCETON,
  address =      pub-PRINCETON:adr,
  pages =        "vii + 458",
  year =         "1997",
  ISBN =         "0-691-02733-1",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-691-02733-3",
  LCCN =         "TA403.B2247 1997",
  bibdate =      "Wed Nov 26 05:45:47 2003",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  abstract =     "This text describes how scientists are inventing
                 thousands of materials, ranging from synthetic skin,
                 blood and bone, to substances that repair themselves
                 and adapt to their environment, that swell and flex
                 like muscles, that repel any ink and paint, and that
                 capture and store the energy from the Sun. It shows
                 that this is being accomplished because materials are
                 being designed for particular applications, rather than
                 being discovered in nature or by haphazard
                 experimentation. Linking insights from chemistry,
                 biology and physics, with those from engineering, the
                 book outlines the various areas in which newly-invented
                 materials will transform our lives in the 21st century.
                 The chapters provide vignettes from a broad range of
                 selected areas of materials science and can be read as
                 separate essays. The subjects include: photonic
                 materials; materials for information storage; smart
                 materials; biomaterials; biomedical materials;
                 materials for clean energy; porous materials; diamond
                 and hard materials; polymers; and surfaces and
                 interfaces. This text describes how scientists are
                 inventing thousands of materials, ranging from
                 synthetic skin, blood and bone, to substances that
                 repair themselves and adapt to their environment. It
                 outlines how newly-invented materials will transform
                 our lives in the 21st century.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  tableofcontents = "The art of making \\
                 Light talk: photonic materials \\
                 Total recall: materials for information storage \\
                 Clever stuff: smart materials \\
                 Only natural: biomaterials \\
                 Spare parts: biomedical materials \\
                 Full power: materials for clean energy \\
                 Tunnel vision: porous materials \\
                 Hard work: diamond and hard materials \\
                 Chain reactions: the new polymers \\
                 Face value: surfaces and interfaces",
}

@Book{Ball:2014:SRS,
  author =       "Philip Ball",
  title =        "Serving the {Reich}: the struggle for the soul of
                 physics under {Hitler}",
  publisher =    pub-U-CHICAGO,
  address =      pub-U-CHICAGO:adr,
  pages =        "ix + 303",
  year =         "2014",
  ISBN =         "0-226-20457-X (hardcover), 0-226-20460-X (e-book)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-226-20457-4 (hardcover), 978-0-226-20460-4
                 (e-book)",
  LCCN =         "QC773.3.G3 B35 2014",
  bibdate =      "Thu Jan 8 08:07:26 MST 2015",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/bibnet/authors/h/heisenberg-werner.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 z3950.loc.gov:7090/Voyager",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  author-dates = "1962--",
  subject =      "National socialism and science; Nuclear physics;
                 Germany; History; 20th century; World War, 1939--1945;
                 Science; Moral and ethical aspects; 1933--1945; Planck,
                 Max; Debye, Peter J. W (Peter Josef William);
                 Heisenberg, Werner",
  subject-dates = "1858--1947; 1884--1966; 1901--1976",
  tableofcontents = "Introduction: Nobel Prize-winner with dirty hands
                 \\
                 As conservatively as possible \\
                 Physics must be rebuilt \\
                 The beginning of something new \\
                 Intellectual freedom is a thing of the past \\
                 Service to science must be service to the nation \\
                 There is very likely a Nordic science \\
                 You obviously cannot swim against the tide \\
                 ``I have seen my death!'' \\
                 As a scientist or as a man \\
                 Hitherto unknown destructive power \\
                 Heisenberg was mostly silent \\
                 We are what we pretend to be \\
                 Epilogue: We did not speak the same language",
}

@Book{Ballard:1982:CV,
  author =       "Dana H. Ballard and Christopher M. Brown",
  title =        "Computer Vision",
  publisher =    pub-PH,
  address =      pub-PH:adr,
  pages =        "xx + 523",
  year =         "1982",
  ISBN =         "0-13-165316-4",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-13-165316-0",
  LCCN =         "TA1632 .B34 1982",
  bibdate =      "Tue Dec 14 22:40:13 1993",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Ballhausen:1962:ILF,
  author =       "Carl J. Ballhausen",
  title =        "Introduction to Ligand Field Theory",
  publisher =    pub-MCGRAW-HILL,
  address =      pub-MCGRAW-HILL:adr,
  pages =        "ix + 298",
  year =         "1962",
  LCCN =         "QD475 .B3",
  bibdate =      "Sat Jul 25 13:55:27 1998",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  xxISBN =       "none",
}

@Book{Banks:1999:SPR,
  author =       "Robert B. Banks",
  title =        "Slicing Pizzas, Racing Turtles, and Further Adventures
                 in Applied Mathematics",
  publisher =    pub-PRINCETON,
  address =      pub-PRINCETON:adr,
  pages =        "xi + 286",
  year =         "1999",
  ISBN =         "0-691-05947-0",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-691-05947-1",
  LCCN =         "QA93 .B358 1999",
  bibdate =      "Mon Dec 06 15:45:23 1999",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  price =        "US\$24.95",
  abstract =     "The author discloses the mathematics behind a host of
                 problems, including gauging the length of the seam on a
                 baseball, predicting the results of melting polar ice
                 caps, and digging a hole to China.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  tableofcontents = "ch. 1: Broad stripes and bright stars \\
                 2: More stars, honeycombs, and snowflakes \\
                 3: Slicing things like pizzas and watermelons \\
                 4: Raindrops keep falling on my head and other goodies
                 \\
                 5: Raindrops and other goodies revisited \\
                 6: Which major rivers flow uphill \\
                 7: A brief look at $\pi$, $e$, and some other famous
                 numbers \\
                 8: Another look at some famous numbers \\
                 9: Great number sequences: prime, Fibonacci, and
                 hailstone \\
                 10: A fast way to escape \\
                 11: How to get anywhere in about forty-two minutes \\
                 12: How fast should you run in the rain \\
                 13: Great turtle races: pursuit curves \\
                 14: More great turtle races: logarithmic spirals \\
                 15: How many people have ever lived \\
                 16: The great explosion of 2023 \\
                 17: How to make fairly nice valentines \\
                 18: Somewhere over the rainbow \\
                 19: Making mathematical mountains \\
                 20: How to make mountains out of molehills \\
                 21: Moving continents from here to there \\
                 22: Cartography: how to flatten spheres \\
                 23: Growth and spreading and mathematical analogies \\
                 24: How long is the seam on a baseball \\
                 25: Baseball seams, pipe connections, and world travels
                 \\
                 26: Lengths, areas, and volumes of all kinds of
                 shapes",
}

@Book{Bardi:2006:CWN,
  author =       "Jason Socrates Bardi",
  title =        "The Calculus Wars: {Newton}, {Leibniz}, and the
                 Greatest Mathematical Clash of All Time",
  publisher =    "Thunder's Mouth Press",
  address =      "New York, NY, USA",
  pages =        "viii + 277",
  year =         "2006",
  ISBN =         "1-56025-992-2, 1-56025-706-7",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-1-56025-992-3, 978-1-56025-706-6",
  LCCN =         "QA303 .B2896 2006",
  bibdate =      "Mon Aug 20 14:41:36 MDT 2007",
  bibsource =    "carmin.sudoc.abes.fr:210/ABES-Z39-PUBLIC;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  abstract =     "Now regarded as the bane of many college students'
                 existence, calculus was one of the most important
                 mathematical innovations of the seventeenth century.
                 But a dispute over its discovery sowed the seeds of
                 discontent between two of the greatest scientific
                 giants of all time --- Sir Isaac Newton and Gottfried
                 Wilhelm Leibniz. Today Newton and Leibniz are generally
                 considered the twin independent inventors of calculus.
                 They are both credited with giving mathematics its
                 greatest push forward since the time of the Greeks. Had
                 they known each other under different circumstances,
                 they might have been friends. But in their own
                 lifetimes, the joint glory of calculus was not enough
                 for either and each declared war against the other,
                 openly and in secret. This long and bitter dispute has
                 been swept under the carpet by historians perhaps
                 because it reveals Newton and Leibniz in their worst
                 light --- but \booktitle{The Calculus Wars} tells the
                 full story in narrative form for the first time. This
                 history ultimately exposes how these twin mathematical
                 giants were brilliant, proud, at times mad, and in the
                 end completely human.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  tableofcontents = "For once it's safe to dream in color, 1704 \\
                 The children of the wars, 1642--1664 \\
                 The trouble with Hooke, 1664--1672 \\
                 The affair of the eyebrow, 1666--1673 \\
                 Farewell and think kindly of me, 1673--1677 \\
                 The beginning of the sublime geometry, 1678--1687 \\
                 The beautiful and the damned, 1687--1691 \\
                 The shortest possible descent, 1690--1696 \\
                 Newton's apes, 1696--1708 \\
                 The burden of proof, 1708--1712 \\
                 The flaws of motion, 1713--1716 \\
                 Purged of ambiguity, 1716--1728",
}

@Book{Barnsley:1988:FE,
  author =       "Michael Barnsley",
  title =        "Fractals Everywhere",
  publisher =    pub-ACADEMIC,
  address =      pub-ACADEMIC:adr,
  pages =        "xii + 394",
  year =         "1988",
  ISBN =         "0-12-079062-9",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-12-079062-3",
  LCCN =         "QA614.86 .B37 1988",
  MRclass =      "*58-01, 00A06, 11K55, 37B99, 37C70, 37D45, 37G15,
                 28A80, 54H20",
  bibdate =      "Tue Dec 14 22:40:15 1993",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/bibnet/authors/m/mandelbrot-benoit.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/datacompression.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  ZMnumber =     "0691.58001",
  abstract =     "This book is based on a course called `Fractal
                 Geometry' which has been taught in the School of
                 Mathematics at Georgia Institute of Technology for two
                 years. \booktitle{Fractals Everywhere} teaches the
                 tools, methods, and theory of deterministic geometry.
                 It is useful for describing specific objects and
                 structures. Models are represented by succinct
                 formulas.' Once the formula is known, the model can be
                 reproduced. we do not consider statistical geometry.
                 The latter aims at discovering general statistical laws
                 which govern families of similar-looking structures,
                 such as all cumulus clouds, all maple leaves, or all
                 mountains. In deterministic geometry, structures are
                 defined, communicated, and analysed, with the aid of
                 elementary transformations such as affine
                 transformations, scalings, rotations, and congruences.
                 A fractal set generally contains infinitely many points
                 whose organization is so complicated that it is not
                 possible to describe the set by specifying directly
                 where each point in it lies. Instead, the set may be
                 define by `the relations between the pieces.' It is
                 rather like describing the solar system by quoting the
                 law of gravitation and stating the initial conditions.
                 Everything follows from that. It appears always to be
                 better to describe in terms of relationships.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  tableofcontents = "Introduction: Applications for Fractal Functions /
                 205 \\
                 Fractal Interpolation Functions / 208 \\
                 The Fractal Dimension of Fractal Interpolation
                 Functions / 223 \\
                 Hidden Variable Fractal Interpolation / 229 \\
                 Space-Filling Curves / 238 \\
                 Julia Sets / 246 \\
                 The Escape Time Algorithm for Computing Pictures of IFS
                 Attractors and Julia Sets / 246 \\
                 Iterated Function Systems Whose Attractors Are Julia
                 Sets / 266 \\
                 The Application of Julia Set Theory to Newton's Method
                 / 276 \\
                 A Rich Source for Fractals: Invariant Sets of
                 Continuous Open Mappings / 287 \\
                 Parameter Spaces and Mandelbrot Sets / 294 \\
                 The Idea of a Parameter Space: A Map of Fractals / 294
                 \\
                 Mandelbrot Sets for Pairs of Transformations / 299 \\
                 The Mandelbrot Set for Julia Sets / 309 \\
                 How to Make Maps of Families of Fractals Using Escape
                 Times / 317 \\
                 Measures on Fractals / 330 \\
                 Introduction to Invariant Measures on Fractals / 330
                 \\
                 Fields and Sigma-Fields / 337 \\
                 Measures / 341 \\
                 Integration / 344 \\
                 The Compact Metric Space (P (X), d) / 349 \\
                 A Contraction Mapping on (P (X)) / 350 \\
                 Elton's Theorem / 364 \\
                 Application to Computer Graphics / 370 \\
                 Recurrent Iterated Function Systems / 379 \\
                 Fractal Systems / 379 \\
                 Recurrent Iterated Function Systems / 383 \\
                 Collage Theorem for Recurrent Iterated Function Systems
                 / 392 \\
                 Fractal Systems with Vectors of Measures as Their
                 Attractors / 403 \\
                 References / 409 \\
                 References / 412 \\
                 Selected Answers / 416 \\
                 Index / 523 \\
                 Credits for Figures and Color Plates / 533",
  xxtableofcontents = "Metric Spaces \\
                 Equivalent Spaces \\
                 Classification of Subsets \\
                 and the Space of Fractals \\
                 Spaces \\
                 Metric Spaces \\
                 Cauchy Sequences, Limit Points, Closed Sets, Perfect
                 Sets, and Complete Metric Spaces \\
                 Compact Sets, Bounded Sets, Open Sets, Interiors, and
                 Boundaries \\
                 Connected Sets, Disconnected Sets, and
                 Pathwise-Connected Sets \\
                 The Metric Space (H (X), h): The Place Where Fractals
                 Live \\
                 The Completeness of the Space of Fractals \\
                 Additional Theorems about Metric Spaces \\
                 Transformations on Metric Spaces \\
                 Contraction Mappings and the Construction of Fractals
                 \\
                 Transformations on the Real Line \\
                 Affine Transformations in the Euclidean Plane \\
                 Mobius Transformations on the Riemann Sphere \\
                 Analytic Transformations \\
                 How to Change Coordinates \\
                 The Contraction Mapping Theorem \\
                 Contraction Mappings on the Space of Fractals \\
                 Two Algorithms for Computing Fractals from Iterated
                 Function Systems \\
                 Condensation Sets \\
                 How to Make Fractal Models with the Help of the Collage
                 Theorem \\
                 Blowing in the Wind: The Continuous Dependence of
                 Fractals on Parameters \\
                 Chaotic Dynamics on Fractals \\
                 The Addresses of Points on Fractals \\
                 Continuous Transformations from Code Space to Fractals
                 \\
                 Introduction to Dynamical Systems \\
                 Dynamics on Fractals: Or How to Compute Orbits by
                 Looking at Pictures \\
                 Equivalent Dynamical Systems \\
                 The Shadow of Deterministic Dynamics \\
                 The Meaningfulness of Inaccurately Computed Orbits is
                 Established by Means of a Shadowing Theorem \\
                 Chaotic Dynamics on Fractals \\
                 Fractal Dimension",
}

@Book{Barroso:2009:DCI,
  author =       "Luiz Andr{\'e} Barroso and Urs H{\"o}lzle",
  title =        "The datacenter as a computer: an introduction to the
                 design of warehouse-scale machines",
  volume =       "6",
  publisher =    "Morgan and Claypool",
  address =      "San Rafael, CA, USA",
  pages =        "xi + 107",
  year =         "2009",
  DOI =          "https://doi.org/10.2200/S00193ED1V01Y200905CAC006",
  ISBN =         "1-59829-556-X (paperback), 1-59829-557-8 (e-book)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-1-59829-556-6 (paperback), 978-1-59829-557-3
                 (e-book)",
  ISSN =         "1932-3243 (??invalid checksum??)",
  LCCN =         "TK5105.5 .B273 2009",
  bibdate =      "Wed Apr 21 17:03:46 MDT 2010",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 melvyl.cdlib.org:210/CDL90",
  series =       "Synthesis lectures on computer architecture",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  subject =      "Web servers; design; multiprocessors; computer
                 organization; high performance computing",
  tableofcontents = "Introduction \\
                 Warehouse-scale computers \\
                 Emphasis on cost efficiency \\
                 Not just a collection of servers \\
                 One datacenter vs. several datacenters \\
                 Why WSCs might matter to you \\
                 Architectural overview of WSCs \\
                 Storage \\
                 Networking fabric \\
                 Storage hierarchy \\
                 Quantifying latency, bandwidth, and capacity \\
                 Power usage \\
                 Handling failures \\
                 Workloads and software infrastructure \\
                 Datacenter vs. desktop \\
                 Performance and availability toolbox \\
                 Cluster-level infrastructure software \\
                 Resource management \\
                 Hardware abstraction and other basic services \\
                 Deployment and maintenance \\
                 Programming frameworks \\
                 Application-level software \\
                 Workload examples \\
                 Online: web search \\
                 Offline: scholar article similarity \\
                 A monitoring infrastructure \\
                 Service-level dashboards \\
                 Performance debugging tools \\
                 Platform-level monitoring \\
                 Buy vs. build \\
                 Further reading \\
                 Hardware building blocks \\
                 Cost-efficient hardware \\
                 How about parallel application performance \\
                 How low-end can you go \\
                 Balanced designs \\
                 Datacenter basics \\
                 Datacenter tier classifications \\
                 Datacenter power systems \\
                 UPS systems \\
                 Power distribution units \\
                 Datacenter cooling systems \\
                 CRAC units \\
                 Free cooling \\
                 Air flow considerations \\
                 In-rack cooling \\
                 Container-based datacenters \\
                 Energy and power efficiency \\
                 Datacenter energy efficiency \\
                 Sources of efficiency losses in datacenters \\
                 Improving the energy efficiency of datacenters \\
                 Measuring the efficiency of computing \\
                 Some useful benchmarks \\
                 Load vs. efficiency \\
                 Energy-proportional computing \\
                 Dynamic power range of energy-proportional machines \\
                 Causes of poor energy proportionality \\
                 How to improve energy proportionality \\
                 Relative effectiveness of low-power modes \\
                 The role of software in energy proportionality \\
                 Datacenter power provisioning \\
                 Deployment and power management strategies \\
                 Advantages of oversubscribing facility power \\
                 Trends in server energy usage \\
                 Conclusions \\
                 Further reading \\
                 Modeling costs \\
                 Capital costs \\
                 Operational costs \\
                 Case studies \\
                 Real-world datacenter costs \\
                 Modeling a partially filled datacenter \\
                 Dealing with failures and repairs \\
                 Implications of software-based fault tolerance \\
                 Categorizing faults \\
                 Fault severity \\
                 Causes of service-level faults \\
                 Machine-level failures \\
                 What causes machine crashes \\
                 Predicting faults \\
                 Repairs \\
                 Tolerating faults, not hiding them \\
                 Closing remarks \\
                 Hardware \\
                 Software \\
                 Economics \\
                 Key challenges \\
                 Rapidly changing workloads \\
                 Building balanced systems from imbalanced components
                 \\
                 Curbing energy usage \\
                 Amdahl's cruel law \\
                 Conclusions \\
                 References.",
}

@Book{Barrow:1979:PC,
  author =       "Gordon M. Barrow",
  title =        "Physical Chemistry",
  publisher =    pub-MCGRAW-HILL,
  address =      pub-MCGRAW-HILL:adr,
  edition =      "Fourth",
  pages =        "xvi + 832",
  year =         "1979",
  ISBN =         "0-07-003825-2 (hardcover), 0-07-066170-7 (paperback)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-07-003825-7 (hardcover), 978-0-07-066170-7
                 (paperback)",
  LCCN =         "QD453.2.B37 1979",
  bibdate =      "Sat Jul 25 13:55:27 1998",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  tableofcontents = "Preface \\
                 The Physical Properties of Gases / 1 \\
                 The Molecular Theory of Gases / 48 \\
                 Energy of Chemical Systems: The First Law of
                 Thermodynamics / 100 \\
                 Entropy and the Second and Third Laws of Thermodynamics
                 / 160 \\
                 Free Energy and Chemical Equilibria / 213 \\
                 Solutions / 274 \\
                 Phase Equilibria / 313 \\
                 Electrolytes in Solution / 360 \\
                 Elements of Quantum Mechanics / 427 \\
                 Electronic Structures of Atoms and Diatomic Molecules /
                 476 \\
                 Symmetry and the Electronic States of Molecules / 530
                 \\
                 Spectroscopy / 567 \\
                 Diffraction / 647 \\
                 Electrical and Magnetic Properties / 700 \\
                 Rates and Mechanisms / 726 \\
                 Elementary Reactions / 775 \\
                 Macromolecules / 826 \\
                 Appendix A Mathematics / 863 \\
                 Appendix B Tables of Properties / 873 \\
                 Appendix C Character Tables for a Selection of Point
                 Tables / 891 \\
                 Appendix D SI Units / 895 \\
                 Index / 897",
}

@Book{Barrow:1992:PSC,
  author =       "John D. Barrow",
  title =        "Pi in the Sky: Counting, Thinking, and Being",
  publisher =    pub-CLARENDON,
  address =      pub-CLARENDON:adr,
  pages =        "ix + 317",
  year =         "1992",
  ISBN =         "0-19-853956-8",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-19-853956-8",
  LCCN =         "QA36 .B37 1992",
  bibdate =      "Sat Dec 17 14:44:47 MST 2005",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/pi.bib;
                 z3950.loc.gov:7090/Voyager",
  price =        "US\$30.00 (Oxford Univ. Press)",
  abstract =     "John D. Barrow's \booktitle{Pi in the Sky} is a
                 profound --- and profoundly different --- exploration
                 of the world of mathematics: where it comes from, what
                 it is, and where it's going to take us if we follow it
                 to the limit in our search for the ultimate meaning of
                 the universe. Barrow begins by investigating whether
                 math is a purely human invention inspired by our
                 practical needs. Or is it something inherent in nature
                 waiting to be discovered? In answering these questions,
                 Barrow provides a bridge between the usually
                 irreconcilable worlds of mathematics and theology.
                 Along the way, he treats us to a history of counting
                 all over the world, from Egyptian hieroglyphics to
                 logical friction, from number mysticism to Marxist
                 mathematics. And he introduces us to a host of peculiar
                 individuals who have thought some of the deepest and
                 strangest thoughts that human minds have ever thought,
                 from Lao-Tse to Robert Pirsig, Charles Darwin, and
                 Umberto Eco. Barrow thus provides the historical
                 framework and the intellectual tools necessary to an
                 understanding of some of today's weightiest
                 mathematical concepts.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  libnote =      "Not in my library.",
  subject =      "Mathematics",
  tableofcontents = "1: From mystery to history \\
                 A mystery within an enigma \\
                 Illusions of certainty \\
                 The secret society \\
                 Non-Euclideanism \\
                 Logics \\
                 To Be or Not To Be \\
                 The Rashomon effect \\
                 The analogy that never breaks down? \\
                 Tinkling symbols \\
                 Thinking about thinking \\
                 2: The Counter Culture \\
                 By the pricking of my thumbs \\
                 The bare bones of history \\
                 Creation or evolution \\
                 The ordinals versus the cardinals \\
                 Counting without counting \\
                 Fingers and toes \\
                 Baser methods \\
                 Counting with base 2 \\
                 The neo-2 system of counting \\
                 Counting in fives \\
                 What's so special about sixty? \\
                 The spread of the decimal system \\
                 The dance of the seven veils \\
                 Ritual geometry \\
                 The place-value system and the invention of zero \\
                 A final accounting \\
                 3: With form but void \\
                 Numerology \\
                 The very opposite \\
                 Hilbert's scheme \\
                 Kurt G{\"o}del \\
                 More surprises \\
                 Thinking by numbers \\
                 Bourbachique math{\'e}matique \\
                 Arithmetic in chaos \\
                 Science friction \\
                 Mathematicians off form \\
                 4: The mothers of inventionism \\
                 Mind from matter \\
                 Shadowlands \\
                 Trap-door functions \\
                 Mathematical creation \\
                 Marxist mathematics \\
                 Complexity and simplicity \\
                 Maths as psychology \\
                 Pre-established mental harmony? \\
                 Self-discovery \\
                 5: Intuitionism: the immaculate construction \\
                 Mathematicians from outer space \\
                 Ramanujan \\
                 Intuitionism and three-valued logic \\
                 A very peculiar practice \\
                 A closer look at Brouwer \\
                 What is `intuition'? The tragedy of Cantor and
                 Kronecker \\
                 Cantor and infinity \\
                 The comedy of Hilbert and Brouwer \\
                 The Four-Colour Conjecture \\
                 Transhuman mathematics \\
                 New-age mathematics \\
                 Paradigms \\
                 Computability, compressibility, and utility \\
                 6: Platonic heavens above and within \\
                 The growth of abstraction \\
                 Footsteps through Plato's footnotes \\
                 The platonic world of mathematics \\
                 Far away and long ago \\
                 The presence of the past \\
                 The unreasonable effectiveness of mathematics \\
                 Difficulties with platonic relationships \\
                 Seance or science? \\
                 Revel without a cause \\
                 A computer ontological argument \\
                 A speculative anthropic interpretation of mathematics.
                 \\
                 Maths and mysticism \\
                 Supernatural numbers?",
}

@Book{Barrow:1996:PSC,
  author =       "John D. Barrow",
  title =        "Pi in the Sky: Counting, Thinking, and Being",
  publisher =    pub-LITTLE-BROWN,
  address =      pub-LITTLE-BROWN:adr,
  pages =        "ix + 317",
  year =         "1996",
  ISBN =         "0-316-08259-7",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-316-08259-4",
  LCCN =         "QA36 .B37 1994",
  bibdate =      "Sat Dec 17 14:44:47 MST 2005",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/pi.bib;
                 z3950.loc.gov:7090/Voyager",
  abstract =     "John D. Barrow's \booktitle{Pi in the Sky} is a
                 profound -- and profoundly different exploration of the
                 world of mathematics: where it comes from, what it is,
                 and where it's going to take us if we follow it to the
                 limit in our search for the ultimate meaning of the
                 universe. Barrow begins by investigating whether math
                 is a purely human invention inspired by our practical
                 needs. Or is it something inherent in nature waiting to
                 be discovered? In answering these questions, Barrow
                 provides a bridge between the usually irreconcilable
                 worlds of mathematics and theology. Along the way, he
                 treats us to a history of counting all over the world,
                 from Egyptian hieroglyphics to logical friction, from
                 number mysticism to Marxist mathematics. And he
                 introduces us to a host of peculiar individuals who
                 have thought some of the deepest and strangest thoughts
                 that human minds have ever thought, from Lao-Tse to
                 Robert Pirsig, Charles Darwin, and Umberto Eco. Barrow
                 thus provides the historical framework and the
                 intellectual tools necessary to an understanding of
                 some of today's weightiest mathematical concepts.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  libnote =      "Not in my library.",
  remark =       "Originally published: Cambridge: Oxford University,
                 1992.",
  subject =      "Mathematics",
  tableofcontents = "1: From mystery to history / 1 \\
                 A mystery within an enigma / 1 \\
                 Illusions of certainty / 2 \\
                 The secret society / 6 \\
                 Non-Euclideanism / 8 \\
                 Logics --- To Be or Not To Be / 15 \\
                 The Rashomon effect / 19 \\
                 The analogy that never breaks down? / 21 \\
                 Tinkling symbols / 23 \\
                 Thinking about thinking / 24 \\
                 2: The counter culture / 26 \\
                 By the pricking of my thumbs / 26 \\
                 The bare bones of history / 28 \\
                 Creation or evolution / 33 \\
                 The ordinals versus the cardinals / 36 \\
                 Counting without counting / 41 \\
                 Fingers and toes / 45 \\
                 Baser methods / 49 \\
                 Counting with base 2 / 51 \\
                 The neo-2 system of counting / 56 \\
                 Counting In fives / 60 \\
                 What's so special about sixty? / 64 \\
                 The spread of the decimal system / 68 \\
                 The dance of the seven veils / 72 \\
                 Ritual geometry / 73 \\
                 The system and the Invention of zero / 81 \\
                 A final accounting / 101 \\
                 3: With form but void / 106 \\
                 Numerology / 106 \\
                 The very opposite / 108 \\
                 Hubert's scheme / 112 \\
                 Kurt G{\"o}del / 117 \\
                 More surprises / 124 \\
                 Thinking by numbers / 127 \\
                 Bourbachique math{\'e}matique / 129 \\
                 Arithmetic in chaos 1 / 34 \\
                 Science friction / 137 \\
                 Mathematics off form / 140 \\
                 4: The mothers of inventionism / 147 \\
                 Mind from matter / 147 \\
                 Shadowlands / 149 \\
                 Trap-door functions / 150 \\
                 Mathematical creation / 154 \\
                 Marxist mathematics / 156 \\
                 Complexity and simplicity / 159 \\
                 Maths as psychology / 165 \\
                 Pre-established mental harmony? / 171 \\
                 Sell-discovery / 176 \\
                 5: Intuitionism: the immaculate construction / 178 \\
                 Mathematicians from outer space / 178 \\
                 Ramanujan / 181 \\
                 Intuitionism and three-valued logic / 185 \\
                 A very peculiar practice / 188 \\
                 A closer look at Brouwer / 192 \\
                 What Is `Intuition'? / 196 \\
                 The tragedy of Cantor and Kronecker / 198 \\
                 Cantor and infinity / 205 \\
                 The comedy of Hubert and Brouwer / 216 \\
                 The Four-Colour Conjecture / 227 \\
                 Transhuman mathematics / 234 \\
                 New-age mathematics / 236 \\
                 Paradigms / 243 \\
                 Computability, compressibility, and utility / 245 \\
                 6: Platonic heavens above and within / 249 \\
                 The growth of abstraction / 249 \\
                 Footsteps through Plato's footnotes / 251 \\
                 The platonic world of mathematics / 258 \\
                 Far away and long ago / 265 \\
                 The presence of the past / 268 \\
                 The unreasonable effectiveness of mathematics / 270 \\
                 Difficulties with platonic relationships / 272 \\
                 Seance or science? / 273 \\
                 Revel without a cause / 276 \\
                 A computer ontological argument / 280 \\
                 A speculative anthropic interpretation of mathematics /
                 284 \\
                 Moths and mysticism / 292 \\
                 Supernatural numbers? / 294 \\
                 further reading / 298 \\
                 Index / 311",
}

@Book{Barrow:1998:ILS,
  author =       "John D. Barrow",
  title =        "Impossibility: the limits of science and the science
                 of limits",
  publisher =    pub-OXFORD,
  address =      pub-OXFORD:adr,
  pages =        "xiii + 279",
  year =         "1998",
  ISBN =         "0-19-851890-0",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-19-851890-7",
  LCCN =         "Q175 .B2245 1998",
  bibdate =      "Sat Dec 17 14:44:47 MST 2005",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 z3950.loc.gov:7090/Voyager",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  libnote =      "Not in my library.",
  subject =      "Science; Philosophy; Limit (Logic); G{\"o}del's
                 theorem",
}

@Book{Barstow:1984:IPE,
  author =       "David R. Barstow and Howard E. Shrobe and Erik
                 Sandewall",
  title =        "Interactive Programming Environments",
  publisher =    pub-MCGRAW-HILL,
  address =      pub-MCGRAW-HILL:adr,
  pages =        "xii + 609",
  year =         "1984",
  ISBN =         "0-07-003885-6",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-07-003885-1",
  LCCN =         "QA76.6 .I5251 1984",
  bibdate =      "Tue Dec 14 22:40:18 1993",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  price =        "US\$34.95",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Bartels:1987:ISU,
  author =       "Richard H. Bartels and John C. Beatty and Brian A.
                 Barsky",
  title =        "An Introduction to Splines for Use in Computer
                 Graphics and Geometric Modeling",
  publisher =    pub-MORGAN-KAUFMANN,
  address =      pub-MORGAN-KAUFMANN:adr,
  pages =        "xiv + 476",
  year =         "1987",
  ISBN =         "0-934613-27-3",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-934613-27-9",
  LCCN =         "T385 .B3651 1987",
  bibdate =      "Tue Dec 14 22:40:21 1993",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  price =        "US\$38.95",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Bartlett:1980:FQC,
  author =       "John Bartlett",
  title =        "Familiar Quotations: a collection of passages,
                 phrases, and proverbs traced to their sources in
                 ancient and modern literature",
  publisher =    pub-LITTLE-BROWN,
  address =      pub-LITTLE-BROWN:adr,
  edition =      "Fifteenth",
  pages =        "lviii + 1540",
  year =         "1980",
  ISBN =         "0-316-08275-9",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-316-08275-4",
  LCCN =         "PN6081 .B3 1980",
  bibdate =      "Tue Dec 14 22:40:24 1993",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  abstract =     "Chronologically arranged entries supply quotations
                 from 2,250 authors and major collective or anonymous
                 works, with an alphabetical index of authors and an
                 index to the text.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  DEWEY =        "808.88/2",
  idnumber =     "525",
  keywords =     "Quotations, English",
  tableofcontents = "Preface to the Fifteenth edition \\
                 Historical note \\
                 Guide to the use of Familiar Quotations \\
                 Index of authors \\
                 Familiar Quotations, from ancient Egypt and the Bible
                 to the present \\
                 Index",
}

@Book{Bartosh:2005:EMX,
  author =       "Michael Bartosh and Ryan Faas",
  title =        "Essential {Mac OS X Panther} Server Administration",
  publisher =    pub-ORA,
  address =      pub-ORA:adr,
  pages =        "xxii + 822",
  year =         "2005",
  ISBN =         "0-596-00635-7 (paperback)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-596-00635-8 (paperback)",
  LCCN =         "QA76.76.O63 B38 2005",
  bibdate =      "Thu Oct 6 07:22:51 MDT 2005",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 melvyl.cdlib.org:210/CDL90",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  remark =       "Integrating Mac OS X server into heterogeneous
                 networks---Cover.",
  subject =      "Mac OS; Operating systems (Computers); Macintosh
                 (Computer); Web servers",
  tableofcontents = "Part I: Server installation and management \\
                 1: Designing your server environment \\
                 2: Installing and configuring Mac OS X server \\
                 3: Server management tools \\
                 4: System administration \\
                 5: Troubleshooting \\
                 Part II: Directory service \\
                 6: Open directory server \\
                 7: Identification and authorization in open directory
                 server \\
                 8: Authentication in open directory server \\
                 9: Replication in open directory server \\
                 Part III: IP services \\
                 10: Xinetd \\
                 11: DNS \\
                 12: DHCP \\
                 13: NAT \\
                 Part IV: File services \\
                 14: File services overview \\
                 15: Apple filing protocol \\
                 16: Windows file services \\
                 17: FTP \\
                 18: Network file system \\
                 19: Print services \\
                 Part V: Security services \\
                 20: Mac OS X server firewall \\
                 21: Virtual private networks \\
                 Part VI: Internet services \\
                 22: Mail services \\
                 23: Web services \\
                 24: Application servers \\
                 Part VII: Client management \\
                 25: Managing preferences for Mac OS X clients \\
                 26: Managing classic Mac OS workstations using Mac
                 manager \\
                 27: Managing windows clients using Mac OS X server \\
                 28: Workstation deployment and maintenance \\
                 29: Apple remote desktop",
}

@Book{Bartusiak:2006:AUD,
  editor =       "Marcia Bartusiak",
  title =        "Archives of the universe: 100 discoveries that
                 transformed our understanding of the cosmos",
  publisher =    pub-VINTAGE,
  address =      pub-VINTAGE:adr,
  pages =        "xvii + 695",
  year =         "2006",
  ISBN =         "0-375-71368-9",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-375-71368-2",
  LCCN =         "QB15 .A75 2006",
  bibdate =      "Tue Sep 1 16:31:05 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/einstein.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 www.iris.rutgers.edu:2200/Unicorn",
  price =        "US\$18.95",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  subject =      "Astronomy; History",
  tableofcontents = "Preface \\
                 \\
                 I. The Ancient Sky \\
                 1 Mayan Venus Tables \\
                 2 Proof That the Earth Is a Sphere \\
                 3 Celestial Surveying \\
                 4 Measuring the Earth's Circumference \\
                 5 Precession of the Equinoxes \\
                 6 Ptolemy's Almagest \\
                 \\
                 II. Revolutions \\
                 7 Copernicus and the Sun-Centered Universe \\
                 8 Tycho Brahe and the Changing Heavens \\
                 9 Johannes Kepler and Planetary Motion \\
                 10 Galileo Initiates the Telescopic Era \\
                 11 Newton's Universal Law of Gravity \\
                 12 Halley's Comet \\
                 13 Binary Stars \\
                 \\
                 III. Taking Measure \\
                 14 The Speed of Light \\
                 15 The Solar System's Origin \\
                 16 Discovery of Uranus \\
                 17 Stars Moving and Changing \\
                 18 The First Asteroid \\
                 19 Distance to a Star \\
                 20 Discovery of Neptune \\
                 21 The Shape of the Milky Way \\
                 22 Spiraling Nebulae \\
                 \\
                 IV. Touching the Heavens \\
                 23 Spectral Lines \\
                 24 Deciphering the Solar Spectrum \\
                 25 Gaseous Nebulae \\
                 26 Doppler Shifts and Spectroscopic Binaries \\
                 27 Classification of the Stars \\
                 28 Giant Stars and Dwarf Stars \\
                 29 Hydrogen: The Prime Element \\
                 30 Stellar Mass, Luminosity, and Stability \\
                 31 Sunspot Cycle, Sun/Earth Connection, and Helium \\
                 32 Origin of Meteors and Shooting Stars \\
                 33 Cosmic Rays \\
                 34 Discovery of Pluto \\
                 \\
                 V. Einsteinian Cosmos \\
                 35 Special Relativity and $E = m c^2$ \\
                 36 General Relativity and the Solar Eclipse Test \\
                 37 Relativistic Models of the Universe \\
                 38 Big Bang Versus Steady State \\
                 39 White Dwarf Stars \\
                 40 Beyond the White Dwarf \\
                 41 Supernovae and Neutron Stars \\
                 42 Black Holes \\
                 43 Source of Stellar Power \\
                 44 Creating Elements in the Big Bang \\
                 45 Cosmic Microwave Background Predicted \\
                 46 Creating Elements in the Stars \\
                 47 A Star's Life Cycle \\
                 \\
                 VI. The Milky Way and Beyond \\
                 48 Cepheids: The Cosmic Standard Candles \\
                 49 Sun's Place in the Milky Way \\
                 50 Dark Nebulae and Interstellar Matter \\
                 51 Discovery of Other Galaxies \\
                 52 Expansion of the Universe \\
                 53 Stellar Populations and Resizing the Universe \\
                 54 Mapping the Milky Way's Spiral Arms \\
                 55 Source and Composition of Comets \\
                 \\
                 VII. New Eyes, New Universe \\
                 56 Radio Astronomy \\
                 57 Interstellar Hydrogen \\
                 58 Molecules in Space \\
                 59 Van Allen Radiation Belts \\
                 60 Geology of Mars \\
                 61 Extrasolar X-Ray Sources \\
                 62 Quasars \\
                 63 Evidence for the Big Bang \\
                 64 Pulsars \\
                 65 The Infrared Sky and the Galactic Center \\
                 66 Neutrino Astronomy \\
                 67 Gamma-Ray Bursts \\
                 68 Binary Pulsar and Gravity Waves \\
                 \\
                 VIII. Accelerating Outward \\
                 69 Dark Matter \\
                 70 Gravitational Lensing \\
                 71 Inflation \\
                 72 The Bubbly Universe \\
                 73 Galaxy Evolution and the Hubble Deep Field \\
                 74 Extrasolar Planets \\
                 75 The Accelerating Universe \\
                 \\
                 Notes \\
                 Bibliography \\
                 Acknowledgments \\
                 Index",
}

@Book{Bartusiak:2009:DWF,
  author =       "Marcia Bartusiak",
  title =        "The Day We Found the Universe",
  publisher =    pub-PANTHEON,
  address =      pub-PANTHEON:adr,
  pages =        "xviii + 337",
  year =         "2009",
  ISBN =         "0-375-42429-6",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-375-42429-8",
  LCCN =         "QB15 .B37 2009",
  bibdate =      "Sat Jun 13 07:47:22 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/einstein.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 z3950.loc.gov:7090/Voyager",
  abstract =     "From one of the most acclaimed science writers comes a
                 dramatic narrative of the discovery of the true nature
                 and startling size of the universe, delving into the
                 decades of work --- by a select group of scientists ---
                 that made it possible. On January 1, 1925,
                 thirty-five-year-old Edwin Hubble announced the
                 observation that ultimately established that our
                 universe was a thousand trillion times larger than
                 previously believed, filled with myriad galaxies like
                 our own. This discovery dramatically reshaped how
                 humans understood their place in the cosmos, and once
                 and for all laid to rest the idea that the Milky Way
                 galaxy was alone in the universe. Six years later,
                 continuing research by Hubble and others forced Albert
                 Einstein to renounce his own cosmic model and finally
                 accept the astonishing fact that the universe was not
                 immobile but instead expanding. The fascinating story
                 of these interwoven discoveries includes battles of
                 will, clever insights, and wrong turns made by the
                 early investigators in this great twentieth-century
                 pursuit. It is a story of science in the making that
                 shows how these discoveries were not the work of a lone
                 genius but the combined efforts of many talented
                 scientists and researchers toiling away behind the
                 scenes. The intriguing characters include Henrietta
                 Leavitt, who discovered the means to measure the vast
                 dimensions of the cosmos; Vesto Slipher, the first and
                 unheralded discoverer of the universe's expansion;
                 Georges Lema{\^\i}tre, the Jesuit priest who correctly
                 interpreted Einstein's theories in relation to the
                 universe; Milton Humason, who, with only an
                 eighth-grade education, became a world-renowned expert
                 on galaxy motions; and Harlow Shapley, Hubble's
                 nemesis, whose flawed vision of the universe delayed
                 the discovery of its true nature and startling size for
                 more than a decade. Here is a watershed moment in the
                 history of astronomy, brought about by the exceptional
                 combination of human curiosity, intelligence, and
                 enterprise, and vividly told by acclaimed science
                 writer Marcia Bartusiak.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  keywords =     "Albert Einstein; Edwin Hubble; Georges Lema{\^\i}tre;
                 Harlow Shapley; Henrietta Leavitt; James Lick
                 (1796--1896); Milton Humason; Vesto Slipher",
  subject =      "astronomy; history",
  tableofcontents = "Preface / January 1, 1925 \\
                 Setting out \\
                 1: The little republic of science \\
                 2: A rather remarkable number of nebulae \\
                 3: Grander than the truth \\
                 4: Such is the progress of astronomy in the wild and
                 wooly West \\
                 5: My regards to the squashes \\
                 6: It is worthy of notice \\
                 Exploration \\
                 7: Empire builder \\
                 8: The solar system is off center and consequently man
                 is too \\
                 9: He surely looks like the fourth dimension! \\
                 10: Go at each other ``hammer and tongs'' \\
                 11: Adonis \\
                 12: On the brink of a big discovery --- or maybe a big
                 paradox \\
                 Discovery \\
                 13: Countless whole worlds --- strewn all over the sky
                 \\
                 14: Using the 100-inch telescope the way it should be
                 used \\
                 15: Your calculations are correct, but your physical
                 insight is abominable \\
                 16: Started off with a bang \\
                 Whatever happened to \ldots{} \\
                 Notes \\
                 Acknowledgments \\
                 Bibliography \\
                 Index",
}

@Book{Batten:1988:RUC,
  author =       "Alan H. (Alan Henry) Batten",
  title =        "Resolute and Undertaking Characters: The Lives of
                 {Wilhelm and Otto Struve}",
  volume =       "139",
  publisher =    pub-REIDEL,
  address =      pub-REIDEL:adr,
  pages =        "xxv + 259",
  year =         "1988",
  DOI =          "https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-009-2883-1",
  ISBN =         "90-277-2652-3",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-90-277-2652-0",
  LCCN =         "QB36.S75 B38 1988",
  bibdate =      "Tue Mar 28 08:28:15 MDT 2017",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 z3950.loc.gov:7090/Voyager",
  series =       "Astrophysics and space science library",
  URL =          "http://www.loc.gov/catdir/enhancements/fy0902/87030386-d.html;
                 http://www.loc.gov/catdir/enhancements/fy0902/87030386-t.html",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  author-dates = "1933--",
  libnote =      "Not in my library.",
  subject =      "Struve, F. G. W. (Friedrich Georg Wilhelm); Struve,
                 Otto; Astronomy; Russia; History; 19th century; Soviet
                 Union; 20th century; Astronomers; Biography; Germany",
  subject-dates = "Friedrich Georg Wilhelm Struve (1793--1864); Otto
                 Struve (1819--1905)",
  tableofcontents = "Preface / xi \\
                 General Note / xv \\
                 Bibliographical Note / xix \\
                 Acknowledgements / xxi \\
                 Chronological Summary of the lives of Wilhelm and Otto
                 Struve / xxiii \\
                 1: Family Origins and Wilhelm's Childhood / 1 \\
                 2: Student Days at Dorpat University / 12 \\
                 3: Astronomy at the Beginning of the Nineteenth Century
                 / 22 \\
                 4: Measuring the Earth / 30 \\
                 5: The Great Refractor / 44 \\
                 6: The Founding of Pulkovo / 66 \\
                 7: The Astronomical Capital of the World / 88 \\
                 8: Measuring the Sky / 113 \\
                 9: The Early Pulkovo Years / 130 \\
                 10: `{\'E}tudes d'astronomie stellaire' / 144 \\
                 11: Wilhelm's Illness and Last Years / 156 \\
                 12: The Transition / 168 \\
                 13: The Companion of Procyon and the Transits of Venus
                 / 181 \\
                 14: The 30-inch Refractor / 196 \\
                 15: Mapping the Sky / 209 \\
                 16: Otto's Retirement and Last Years / 219 \\
                 Epilogue: The Family Tradition / 235 \\
                 Name Index / 245 \\
                 Subject Index / 258",
}

@Book{Bauldry:1991:CLM,
  author =       "William C. Bauldry and Joseph R. Fiedler",
  title =        "Calculus Laboratories with {Maple}: a Tool, Not an
                 Oracle",
  publisher =    pub-BROOKS-COLE,
  address =      pub-BROOKS-COLE:adr,
  pages =        "xii + 144",
  year =         "1991",
  ISBN =         "0-534-13788-1",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-534-13788-5",
  LCCN =         "MLCM 90/01887 (Q)",
  bibdate =      "Wed Dec 15 08:46:50 1993",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  libnote =      "Not yet in my library.",
}

@Book{Be:1997:DGO,
  author =       "{The Be Development Team}",
  title =        "The {Be} Developer's Guide: The Official Documentation
                 for the {BeOS}",
  publisher =    pub-ORA,
  address =      pub-ORA:adr,
  pages =        "xi + 934",
  year =         "1997",
  ISBN =         "1-56592-287-5",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-1-56592-287-7",
  LCCN =         "QA76.76.O63 B43 1997",
  bibdate =      "Wed May 05 15:55:16 1999",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  price =        "US\$49.95",
  URL =          "http://www.ora.com/catalog/be/;
                 http://www.oreilly.com/catalog/bedev",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Be:1998:AT,
  author =       "{The Be Development Team}",
  title =        "{Be} Advanced Topics: Official documentation for the
                 {BeOS}",
  publisher =    pub-ORA,
  address =      pub-ORA:adr,
  pages =        "xi + 365",
  month =        jul,
  year =         "1998",
  ISBN =         "1-56592-396-0",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-1-56592-396-6",
  LCCN =         "QA76.76.O63 B4 1998",
  bibdate =      "Thu Feb 18 07:07:41 1999",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  note =         "Includes BeSpecific 5 CD-ROM.",
  price =        "US\$39.95",
  URL =          "http://www.oreilly.com/catalog/beadv",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Manual{Becker:1981:LSD,
  author =       "Richard A. Becker and John M. Chambers",
  title =        "{S}: a Language and System for Data Analysis",
  organization = "AT\&T Bell Laboratories",
  address =      "Murray Hill, NJ, USA",
  year =         "1981",
  LCCN =         "QA76.7 .B43 1981",
  bibdate =      "Wed Aug 10 10:41:43 1994",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  libnote =      "Not yet in my library.",
}

@Book{Becker:1984:IED,
  author =       "Richard A. Becker and John M. Chambers",
  title =        "{S}: An Interactive Environment for Data Analysis and
                 Graphics",
  publisher =    pub-WADSWORTH,
  address =      pub-WADSWORTH:adr,
  pages =        "xii + 550",
  year =         "1984",
  ISBN =         "0-534-03313-X",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-534-03313-2",
  LCCN =         "QA76.73.S15 B44 1984",
  bibdate =      "Wed Aug 10 18:17:59 1994",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  libnote =      "Not yet in my library.",
}

@Book{Becker:1985:ES,
  author =       "Richard A. Becker and John M. Chambers",
  title =        "Extending the {S} System",
  publisher =    pub-WADSWORTH,
  address =      pub-WADSWORTH:adr,
  pages =        "viii + 166",
  year =         "1985",
  ISBN =         "0-534-05016-6",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-534-05016-0",
  LCCN =         "QA276.4 .B4241 1985",
  bibdate =      "Wed Aug 10 10:38:24 1994",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  libnote =      "Not yet in my library.",
}

@Book{Becker:1988:NPL,
  author =       "Richard A. Becker and John M. Chambers and Allan R.
                 Wilks",
  title =        "The New {S} Programming Language",
  publisher =    pub-WADSWORTH # " and " # pub-BROOKS-COLE,
  address =      pub-WADSWORTH:adr # " and " # pub-BROOKS-COLE:adr,
  pages =        "xvii + 702",
  year =         "1988",
  ISBN =         "0-534-09192-X, 0-534-09193-8",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-534-09192-7, 978-0-534-09193-4",
  LCCN =         "QA76.73.S15 B43 1988",
  MRclass =      "68-01, 62-04, 62-07, 68P05, 68U99",
  bibdate =      "Wed Aug 10 17:37:02 1994",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/s-plus.bib",
  ZMnumber =     "0642.68003",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Beckmann:1993:HP,
  author =       "Petr Beckmann",
  title =        "A history of $ \pi $",
  publisher =    pub-BARNES-NOBLE,
  address =      pub-BARNES-NOBLE:adr,
  pages =        "200",
  year =         "1993",
  ISBN =         "0-88029-418-3",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-88029-418-8",
  LCCN =         "QA484 .B4 1971",
  bibdate =      "Mon Mar 06 08:52:46 2000",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/pi.bib",
  note =         "Reprint of the third edition of 1971.",
  price =        "US\$6.98",
  abstract =     "Documents the calculation, numerical value, and use of
                 the ratio from 2000 B.C. to the modern computer age,
                 detailing social conditions in eras when progress was
                 made.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  tableofcontents = "Dawn \\
                 The Belt \\
                 The Early Greeks \\
                 Euclid \\
                 The Roman pest \\
                 Archimedes of Syracuse \\
                 Dusk \\
                 Night \\
                 Awakening \\
                 The Digit hunters \\
                 The Last Archimedians \\
                 Prelude to breakthrough \\
                 Newton \\
                 Euler \\
                 The Monte Carlo method \\
                 The Transcendence of [pi] \\
                 The Modern circle squares \\
                 The Computer age \\
                 Chronological table",
  xxnote =       "Fourth edition, 1977, Golem Press, Boulder, CO, ISBN
                 0-911762-18-3, LCCN QA484 .B4 1977, also available.",
}

@Book{Beebe:2017:MFC,
  author =       "Nelson H. F. Beebe",
  title =        "The Mathematical-Function Computation Handbook:
                 Programming Using the {MathCW} Portable Software
                 Library",
  publisher =    pub-SV,
  address =      pub-SV:adr,
  pages =        "xxxvi + 1114",
  year =         "2017",
  DOI =          "https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-64110-2",
  ISBN =         "3-319-64109-3 (hardcover), 3-319-64110-7 (e-book)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-3-319-64109-6 (hardcover), 978-3-319-64110-2
                 (e-book)",
  LCCN =         "QA75.5-76.95",
  bibdate =      "Sat Jul 15 19:34:43 MDT 2017",
  bibsource =    "fsz3950.oclc.org:210/WorldCat;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/bibnet/authors/b/beebe-nelson-h-f.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/axiom.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/cryptography2010.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/elefunt.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/fparith.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/maple-extract.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/mathematica.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/matlab.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/mupad.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/numana2010.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/prng.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/redbooks.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/utah-math-dept-books.bib",
  URL =          "http://www.springer.com/us/book/9783319641096",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  ORCID-numbers = "Beebe, Nelson H. F./0000-0001-7281-4263",
  tableofcontents = "List of figures / xxv \\
                 List of tables / xxxi \\
                 Quick start / xxxv \\
                 1: Introduction / 1 \\
                 1.1: Programming conventions / 2 \\
                 1.2: Naming conventions / 4 \\
                 1.3: Library contributions and coverage / 5 \\
                 1.4: Summary / 6 \\
                 2: Iterative solutions and other tools / 7 \\
                 2.1: Polynomials and Taylor series / 7 \\
                 2.2: First-order Taylor series approximation / 8 \\
                 2.3: Second-order Taylor series approximation / 9 \\
                 2.4: Another second-order Taylor series approximation /
                 9 \\
                 2.5: Convergence of second-order methods / 10 \\
                 2.6: Taylor series for elementary functions / 10 \\
                 2.7: Continued fractions / 12 \\
                 2.8: Summation of continued fractions / 17 \\
                 2.9: Asymptotic expansions / 19 \\
                 2.10: Series inversion / 20 \\
                 2.11: Summary / 22 \\
                 3: Polynomial approximations / 23 \\
                 3.1: Computation of odd series / 23 \\
                 3.2: Computation of even series / 25 \\
                 3.3: Computation of general series / 25 \\
                 3.4: Limitations of Cody\slash Waite polynomials / 28
                 \\
                 3.5: Polynomial fits with Maple / 32 \\
                 3.6: Polynomial fits with Mathematica / 33 \\
                 3.7: Exact polynomial coefficients / 42 \\
                 3.8: Cody\slash Waite rational polynomials / 43 \\
                 3.9: Chebyshev polynomial economization / 43 \\
                 3.10: Evaluating Chebyshev polynomials / 48 \\
                 3.11: Error compensation in Chebyshev fits / 50 \\
                 3.12: Improving Chebyshev fits / 51 \\
                 3.13: Chebyshev fits in rational form / 52 \\
                 3.14: Chebyshev fits with Mathematica / 56 \\
                 3.15: Chebyshev fits for function representation / 57
                 \\
                 3.16: Extending the library / 57 \\
                 3.17: Summary and further reading / 58 \\
                 4: Implementation issues / 61 \\
                 4.1: Error magnification / 61 \\
                 4.2: Machine representation and machine epsilon / 62
                 \\
                 4.3: IEEE 754 arithmetic / 63 \\
                 4.4: Evaluation order in C / 64 \\
                 4.5: The {\tt volatile} type qualifier / 65 \\
                 4.6: Rounding in floating-point arithmetic / 66 \\
                 4.7: Signed zero / 69 \\
                 4.8: Floating-point zero divide / 70 \\
                 4.9: Floating-point overflow / 71 \\
                 4.10: Integer overflow / 72 \\
                 4.11: Floating-point underflow / 77 \\
                 4.12: Subnormal numbers / 78 \\
                 4.13: Floating-point inexact operation / 79 \\
                 4.14: Floating-point invalid operation / 79 \\
                 4.15: Remarks on NaN tests / 80 \\
                 4.16: Ulps --- units in the last place / 81 \\
                 4.17: Fused multiply-add / 85 \\
                 4.18: Fused multiply-add and polynomials / 88 \\
                 4.19: Significance loss / 89 \\
                 4.20: Error handling and reporting / 89 \\
                 4.21: Interpreting error codes / 93 \\
                 4.22: C99 changes to error reporting / 94 \\
                 4.23: Error reporting with threads / 95 \\
                 4.24: Comments on error reporting / 95 \\
                 4.25: Testing function implementations / 96 \\
                 4.26: Extended data types on Hewlett--Packard HP-UX
                 IA-64 / 100 \\
                 4.27: Extensions for decimal arithmetic / 101 \\
                 4.28: Further reading / 103 \\
                 4.29: Summary / 104 \\
                 5: The floating-point environment / 105 \\
                 5.1: IEEE 754 and programming languages / 105 \\
                 5.2: IEEE 754 and the mathcw library / 106 \\
                 5.3: Exceptions and traps / 106 \\
                 5.4: Access to exception flags and rounding control /
                 107 \\
                 5.5: The environment access pragma / 110 \\
                 5.6: Implementation of exception-flag and
                 rounding-control access / 110 \\
                 5.7: Using exception flags: simple cases / 112 \\
                 5.8: Using rounding control / 115 \\
                 5.9: Additional exception flag access / 116 \\
                 5.10: Using exception flags: complex case / 120 \\
                 5.11: Access to precision control / 123 \\
                 5.12: Using precision control / 126 \\
                 5.13: Summary / 127 \\
                 6: Converting floating-point values to integers / 129
                 \\
                 6.1: Integer conversion in programming languages / 129
                 \\
                 6.2: Programming issues for conversions to integers /
                 130 \\
                 6.3: Hardware out-of-range conversions / 131 \\
                 6.4: Rounding modes and integer conversions / 132 \\
                 6.5: Extracting integral and fractional parts / 132 \\
                 6.6: Truncation functions / 135 \\
                 6.7: Ceiling and floor functions / 136 \\
                 6.8: Floating-point rounding functions with fixed
                 rounding / 137 \\
                 6.9: Floating-point rounding functions: current
                 rounding / 138 \\
                 6.10: Floating-point rounding functions without {\em
                 inexact\/} exception / 139 \\
                 6.11: Integer rounding functions with fixed rounding /
                 140 \\
                 6.12: Integer rounding functions with current rounding
                 / 142 \\
                 6.13: Remainder / 143 \\
                 6.14: Why the remainder functions are hard / 144 \\
                 6.15: Computing {\tt fmod} / 146 \\
                 6.16: Computing {\tt remainder} / 148 \\
                 6.17: Computing {\tt remquo} / 150 \\
                 6.18: Computing one remainder from the other / 152 \\
                 6.19: Computing the remainder in nonbinary bases / 155
                 \\
                 6.20: Summary / 156 \\
                 7: Random numbers / 157 \\
                 7.1: Guidelines for random-number software / 157 \\
                 7.2: Creating generator seeds / 158 \\
                 7.3: Random floating-point values / 160 \\
                 7.4: Random integers from floating-point generator /
                 165 \\
                 7.5: Random integers from an integer generator / 166
                 \\
                 7.6: Random integers in ascending order / 168 \\
                 7.7: How random numbers are generated / 169 \\
                 7.8: Removing generator bias / 178 \\
                 7.9: Improving a poor random number generator / 178 \\
                 7.10: Why long periods matter / 179 \\
                 7.11: Inversive congruential generators / 180 \\
                 7.12: Inversive congruential generators, revisited /
                 189 \\
                 7.13: Distributions of random numbers / 189 \\
                 7.14: Other distributions / 195 \\
                 7.15: Testing random-number generators / 196 \\
                 7.16: Applications of random numbers / 202 \\
                 7.17: The \textsf {mathcw} random number routines / 208
                 \\
                 7.18: Summary, advice, and further reading / 214 \\
                 8: Roots / 215 \\
                 8.1: Square root / 215 \\
                 8.2: Hypotenuse and vector norms / 222 \\
                 8.3: Hypotenuse by iteration / 227 \\
                 8.4: Reciprocal square root / 233 \\
                 8.5: Cube root / 237 \\
                 8.6: Roots in hardware / 240 \\
                 8.7: Summary / 242 \\
                 9: Argument reduction / 243 \\
                 9.1: Simple argument reduction / 243 \\
                 9.2: Exact argument reduction / 250 \\
                 9.3: Implementing exact argument reduction / 253 \\
                 9.4: Testing argument reduction / 265 \\
                 9.5: Retrospective on argument reduction / 265 \\
                 10: Exponential and logarithm / 267 \\
                 10.1: Exponential functions / 267 \\
                 10.2: Exponential near zero / 273 \\
                 10.3: Logarithm functions / 282 \\
                 10.4: Logarithm near one / 290 \\
                 10.5: Exponential and logarithm in hardware / 292 \\
                 10.6: Compound interest and annuities / 294 \\
                 10.7: Summary / 298 \\
                 11: Trigonometric functions / 299 \\
                 11.1: Sine and cosine properties / 299 \\
                 11.2: Tangent properties / 302 \\
                 11.3: Argument conventions and units / 304 \\
                 11.4: Computing the cosine and sine / 306 \\
                 11.5: Computing the tangent / 310 \\
                 11.6: Trigonometric functions in degrees / 313 \\
                 11.7: Trigonometric functions in units of $ \pi $ / 315
                 \\
                 11.8: Computing the cosine and sine together / 320 \\
                 11.9: Inverse sine and cosine / 323 \\
                 11.10: Inverse tangent / 331 \\
                 11.11: Inverse tangent, take two / 336 \\
                 11.12: Trigonometric functions in hardware / 338 \\
                 11.13: Testing trigonometric functions / 339 \\
                 11.14: Retrospective on trigonometric functions / 340
                 \\
                 12: Hyperbolic functions / 341 \\
                 12.1: Hyperbolic functions / 341 \\
                 12.2: Improving the hyperbolic functions / 345 \\
                 12.3: Computing the hyperbolic functions together / 348
                 \\
                 12.4: Inverse hyperbolic functions / 348 \\
                 12.5: Hyperbolic functions in hardware / 350 \\
                 12.6: Summary / 352 \\
                 13: Pair-precision arithmetic / 353 \\
                 13.1: Limitations of pair-precision arithmetic / 354
                 \\
                 13.2: Design of the pair-precision software interface /
                 355 \\
                 13.3: Pair-precision initialization / 356 \\
                 13.4: Pair-precision evaluation / 357 \\
                 13.5: Pair-precision high part / 357 \\
                 13.6: Pair-precision low part / 357 \\
                 13.7: Pair-precision copy / 357 \\
                 13.8: Pair-precision negation / 358 \\
                 13.9: Pair-precision absolute value / 358 \\
                 13.10: Pair-precision sum / 358 \\
                 13.11: Splitting numbers into pair sums / 359 \\
                 13.12: Premature overflow in splitting / 362 \\
                 13.13: Pair-precision addition / 365 \\
                 13.14: Pair-precision subtraction / 367 \\
                 13.15: Pair-precision comparison / 368 \\
                 13.16: Pair-precision multiplication / 368 \\
                 13.17: Pair-precision division / 371 \\
                 13.18: Pair-precision square root / 373 \\
                 13.19: Pair-precision cube root / 377 \\
                 13.20: Accuracy of pair-precision arithmetic / 379 \\
                 13.21: Pair-precision vector sum / 384 \\
                 13.22: Exact vector sums / 385 \\
                 13.23: Pair-precision dot product / 385 \\
                 13.24: Pair-precision product sum / 386 \\
                 13.25: Pair-precision decimal arithmetic / 387 \\
                 13.26: Fused multiply-add with pair precision / 388 \\
                 13.27: Higher intermediate precision and the FMA / 393
                 \\
                 13.28: Fused multiply-add without pair precision / 395
                 \\
                 13.29: Fused multiply-add with multiple precision / 401
                 \\
                 13.30: Fused multiply-add, Boldo/\penalty
                 \exhyphenpenalty Melquiond style / 403 \\
                 13.31: Error correction in fused multiply-add / 406 \\
                 13.32: Retrospective on pair-precision arithmetic / 407
                 \\
                 14: Power function / 411 \\
                 14.1: Why the power function is hard to compute / 411
                 \\
                 14.2: Special cases for the power function / 412 \\
                 14.3: Integer powers / 414 \\
                 14.4: Integer powers, revisited / 420 \\
                 14.5: Outline of the power-function algorithm / 421 \\
                 14.6: Finding $a$ and $p$ / 423 \\
                 14.7: Table searching / 424 \\
                 14.8: Computing $\log_n(g/a)$ / 426 \\
                 14.9: Accuracy required for $\log_n(g/a)$ / 429 \\
                 14.10: Exact products / 430 \\
                 14.11: Computing $w$, $w_1$ and $w_2$ / 433 \\
                 14.12: Computing $n^{w_2}$ / 437 \\
                 14.13: The choice of $q$ / 438 \\
                 14.14: Testing the power function / 438 \\
                 14.15: Retrospective on the power function / 440 \\
                 15: Complex arithmetic primitives / 441 \\
                 15.1: Support macros and type definitions / 442 \\
                 15.2: Complex absolute value / 443 \\
                 15.3: Complex addition / 445 \\
                 15.4: Complex argument / 445 \\
                 15.5: Complex conjugate / 446 \\
                 15.6: Complex conjugation symmetry / 446 \\
                 15.7: Complex conversion / 448 \\
                 15.8: Complex copy / 448 \\
                 15.9: Complex division: C99 style / 449 \\
                 15.10: Complex division: Smith style / 451 \\
                 15.11: Complex division: Stewart style / 452 \\
                 15.12: Complex division: Priest style / 453 \\
                 15.13: Complex division: avoiding subtraction loss /
                 455 \\
                 15.14: Complex imaginary part / 456 \\
                 15.15: Complex multiplication / 456 \\
                 15.16: Complex multiplication: error analysis / 458 \\
                 15.17: Complex negation / 459 \\
                 15.18: Complex projection / 460 \\
                 15.19: Complex real part / 460 \\
                 15.20: Complex subtraction / 461 \\
                 15.21: Complex infinity test / 462 \\
                 15.22: Complex NaN test / 462 \\
                 15.23: Summary / 463 \\
                 16: Quadratic equations / 465 \\
                 16.1: Solving quadratic equations / 465 \\
                 16.2: Root sensitivity / 471 \\
                 16.3: Testing a quadratic-equation solver / 472 \\
                 16.4: Summary / 474 \\
                 17: Elementary functions in complex arithmetic / 475
                 \\
                 17.1: Research on complex elementary functions / 475
                 \\
                 17.2: Principal values / 476 \\
                 17.3: Branch cuts / 476 \\
                 17.4: Software problems with negative zeros / 478 \\
                 17.5: Complex elementary function tree / 479 \\
                 17.6: Series for complex functions / 479 \\
                 17.7: Complex square root / 480 \\
                 17.8: Complex cube root / 485 \\
                 17.9: Complex exponential / 487 \\
                 17.10: Complex exponential near zero / 492 \\
                 17.11: Complex logarithm / 495 \\
                 17.12: Complex logarithm near one / 497 \\
                 17.13: Complex power / 500 \\
                 17.14: Complex trigonometric functions / 502 \\
                 17.15: Complex inverse trigonometric functions / 504
                 \\
                 17.16: Complex hyperbolic functions / 509 \\
                 17.17: Complex inverse hyperbolic functions / 514 \\
                 17.18: Summary / 520 \\
                 18: The Greek functions: gamma, psi, and zeta / 521 \\
                 18.1: Gamma and log-gamma functions / 521 \\
                 18.2: The {\tt psi} and {\tt psiln} functions / 536 \\
                 18.3: Polygamma functions / 547 \\
                 18.4: Incomplete gamma functions / 560 \\
                 18.5: A Swiss diversion: Bernoulli and Euler / 568 \\
                 18.6: An Italian excursion: Fibonacci numbers / 575 \\
                 18.7: A German gem: the Riemann zeta function / 579 \\
                 18.8: Further reading / 590 \\
                 18.9: Summary / 591 \\
                 19: Error and probability functions / 593 \\
                 19.1: Error functions / 593 \\
                 19.2: Scaled complementary error function / 598 \\
                 19.3: Inverse error functions / 600 \\
                 19.4: Normal distribution functions and inverses / 610
                 \\
                 19.5: Summary / 617 \\
                 20: Elliptic integral functions / 619 \\
                 20.1: The arithmetic-geometric mean / 619 \\
                 20.2: Elliptic integral functions of the first kind /
                 624 \\
                 20.3: Elliptic integral functions of the second kind /
                 627 \\
                 20.4: Elliptic integral functions of the third kind /
                 630 \\
                 20.5: Computing $K(m)$ and $K'(m)$ / 631 \\
                 20.6: Computing $E(m)$ and $E'(m)$ / 637 \\
                 20.7: Historical algorithms for elliptic integrals /
                 643 \\
                 20.8: Auxiliary functions for elliptic integrals / 645
                 \\
                 20.9: Computing the elliptic auxiliary functions / 648
                 \\
                 20.10: Historical elliptic functions / 650 \\
                 20.11: Elliptic functions in software / 652 \\
                 20.12: Applications of elliptic auxiliary functions /
                 653 \\
                 20.13: Elementary functions from elliptic auxiliary
                 functions / 654 \\
                 20.14: Computing elementary functions via $R_C(x,y)$ /
                 655 \\
                 20.15: Jacobian elliptic functions / 657 \\
                 20.16: Inverses of Jacobian elliptic functions / 664
                 \\
                 20.17: The modulus and the nome / 668 \\
                 20.18: Jacobian theta functions / 673 \\
                 20.19: Logarithmic derivatives of the Jacobian theta
                 functions / 675 \\
                 20.20: Neville theta functions / 678 \\
                 20.21: Jacobian Eta, Theta, and Zeta functions / 679
                 \\
                 20.22: Weierstrass elliptic functions / 682 \\
                 20.23: Weierstrass functions by duplication / 689 \\
                 20.24: Complete elliptic functions, revisited / 690 \\
                 20.25: Summary / 691 \\
                 21: Bessel functions / 693 \\
                 21.1: Cylindrical Bessel functions / 694 \\
                 21.2: Behavior of $J_n(x)$ and $Y_n(x)$ / 695 \\
                 21.3: Properties of $J_n(z)$ and $Y_n(z)$ / 697 \\
                 21.4: Experiments with recurrences for $J_0(x)$ / 705
                 \\
                 21.5: Computing $J_0(x)$ and $J_1(x)$ / 707 \\
                 21.6: Computing $J_n(x)$ / 710 \\
                 21.7: Computing $Y_0(x)$ and $Y_1(x)$ / 713 \\
                 21.8: Computing $Y_n(x)$ / 715 \\
                 21.9: Improving Bessel code near zeros / 716 \\
                 21.10: Properties of $I_n(z)$ and $K_n(z)$ / 718 \\
                 21.11: Computing $I_0(x)$ and $I_1(x)$ / 724 \\
                 21.12: Computing $K_0(x)$ and $K_1(x)$ / 726 \\
                 21.13: Computing $I_n(x)$ and $K_n(x)$ / 728 \\
                 21.14: Properties of spherical Bessel functions / 731
                 \\
                 21.15: Computing $j_n(x)$ and $y_n(x)$ / 735 \\
                 21.16: Improving $j_1(x)$ and $y_1(x)$ / 740 \\
                 21.17: Modified spherical Bessel functions / 743 \\
                 21.18: Software for Bessel-function sequences / 755 \\
                 21.19: Retrospective on Bessel functions / 761 \\
                 22: Testing the library / 763 \\
                 22.1: Testing {\tt tgamma} and {\tt lgamma} / 765 \\
                 22.2: Testing {\tt psi} and {\tt psiln} / 768 \\
                 22.3: Testing {\tt erf} and {\tt erfc} / 768 \\
                 22.4: Testing cylindrical Bessel functions / 769 \\
                 22.5: Testing exponent/\penalty \exhyphenpenalty
                 significand manipulation / 769 \\
                 22.6: Testing inline assembly code / 769 \\
                 22.7: Testing with Maple / 770 \\
                 22.8: Testing floating-point arithmetic / 773 \\
                 22.9: The Berkeley Elementary Functions Test Suite /
                 774 \\
                 22.10: The AT\&T floating-point test package / 775 \\
                 22.11: The Antwerp test suite / 776 \\
                 22.12: Summary / 776 \\
                 23: Pair-precision elementary functions / 777 \\
                 23.1: Pair-precision integer power / 777 \\
                 23.2: Pair-precision machine epsilon / 779 \\
                 23.3: Pair-precision exponential / 780 \\
                 23.4: Pair-precision logarithm / 787 \\
                 23.5: Pair-precision logarithm near one / 793 \\
                 23.6: Pair-precision exponential near zero / 793 \\
                 23.7: Pair-precision base-$n$ exponentials / 795 \\
                 23.8: Pair-precision trigonometric functions / 796 \\
                 23.9: Pair-precision inverse trigonometric functions /
                 801 \\
                 23.10: Pair-precision hyperbolic functions / 804 \\
                 23.11: Pair-precision inverse hyperbolic functions /
                 808 \\
                 23.12: Summary / 808 \\
                 24: Accuracy of the Cody\slash Waite algorithms / 811
                 \\
                 25: Improving upon the Cody\slash Waite algorithms /
                 823 \\
                 25.1: The Bell Labs libraries / 823 \\
                 25.2: The {Cephes} library / 823 \\
                 25.3: The {Sun} libraries / 824 \\
                 25.4: Mathematical functions on EPIC / 824 \\
                 25.5: The GNU libraries / 825 \\
                 25.6: The French libraries / 825 \\
                 25.7: The NIST effort / 826 \\
                 25.8: Commercial mathematical libraries / 826 \\
                 25.9: Mathematical libraries for decimal arithmetic /
                 826 \\
                 25.10: Mathematical library research publications / 826
                 \\
                 25.11: Books on computing mathematical functions / 827
                 \\
                 25.12: Summary / 828 \\
                 26: Floating-point output / 829 \\
                 26.1: Output character string design issues / 830 \\
                 26.2: Exact output conversion / 831 \\
                 26.3: Hexadecimal floating-point output / 832 \\
                 26.4: Octal floating-point output / 850 \\
                 26.5: Binary floating-point output / 851 \\
                 26.6: Decimal floating-point output / 851 \\
                 26.7: Accuracy of output conversion / 865 \\
                 26.8: Output conversion to a general base / 865 \\
                 26.9: Output conversion of Infinity / 866 \\
                 26.10: Output conversion of NaN / 866 \\
                 26.11: Number-to-string conversion / 867 \\
                 26.12: The {\tt printf} family / 867 \\
                 26.13: Summary / 878 \\
                 27: Floating-point input / 879 \\
                 27.1: Binary floating-point input / 879 \\
                 27.2: Octal floating-point input / 894 \\
                 27.3: Hexadecimal floating-point input / 895 \\
                 27.4: Decimal floating-point input / 895 \\
                 27.5: Based-number input / 899 \\
                 27.6: General floating-point input / 900 \\
                 27.7: The {\tt scanf} family / 901 \\
                 27.8: Summary / 910 \\
                 A: Ada interface / 911 \\
                 A.1: Building the Ada interface / 911 \\
                 A.2: Programming the Ada interface / 912 \\
                 A.3: Using the Ada interface / 915 \\
                 B: C\# interface / 917 \\
                 B.1: C\# on the CLI virtual machine / 917 \\
                 B.2: Building the C\# interface / 918 \\
                 B.3: Programming the C\# interface / 920 \\
                 B.4: Using the C\# interface / 922 \\
                 C: C++ interface / 923 \\
                 C.1: Building the C++ interface / 923 \\
                 C.2: Programming the C++ interface / 924 \\
                 C.3: Using the C++ interface / 925 \\
                 D: Decimal arithmetic / 927 \\
                 D.1: Why we need decimal floating-point arithmetic /
                 927 \\
                 D.2: Decimal floating-point arithmetic design issues /
                 928 \\
                 D.3: How decimal and binary arithmetic differ / 931 \\
                 D.4: Initialization of decimal floating-point storage /
                 935 \\
                 D.5: The {\tt <decfloat.h>} header file / 936 \\
                 D.6: Rounding in decimal arithmetic / 936 \\
                 D.7: Exact scaling in decimal arithmetic / 937 \\
                 E: Errata in the Cody\slash Waite book / 939 \\
                 F: Fortran interface / 941 \\
                 F.1: Building the Fortran interface / 943 \\
                 F.2: Programming the Fortran interface / 944 \\
                 F.3: Using the Fortran interface / 945 \\
                 H: Historical floating-point architectures / 947 \\
                 H.1: CDC family / 949 \\
                 H.2: Cray family / 952 \\
                 H.3: DEC PDP-10 / 953 \\
                 H.4: DEC PDP-11 and VAX / 956 \\
                 H.5: General Electric 600 series / 958 \\
                 H.6: IBM family / 959 \\
                 H.7: Lawrence Livermore S-1 Mark IIA / 965 \\
                 H.8: Unusual floating-point systems / 966 \\
                 H.9: Historical retrospective / 967 \\
                 I: Integer arithmetic / 969 \\
                 I.1: Memory addressing and integers / 971 \\
                 I.2: Representations of signed integers / 971 \\
                 I.3: Parity testing / 975 \\
                 I.4: Sign testing / 975 \\
                 I.5: Arithmetic exceptions / 975 \\
                 I.6: Notations for binary numbers / 977 \\
                 I.7: Summary / 978 \\
                 J: Java interface / 979 \\
                 J.1: Building the Java interface / 979 \\
                 J.2: Programming the Java MathCW class / 980 \\
                 J.3: Programming the Java C interface / 982 \\
                 J.4: Using the Java interface / 985 \\
                 L: Letter notation / 987 \\
                 P: Pascal interface / 989 \\
                 P.1: Building the Pascal interface / 989 \\
                 P.2: Programming the Pascal MathCW module / 990 \\
                 P.3: Using the Pascal module interface / 993 \\
                 P.4: Pascal and numeric programming / 994 \\
                 Bibliography / 995 \\
                 Author/editor index / 1039 \\
                 Function and macro index / 1049 \\
                 Subject index / 1065 \\
                 Colophon / 1115",
}

@Article{Beebe:dvi-drivers,
  author =       "Nelson H. F. Beebe",
  title =        "A {{\TeX DVI}} Driver Family",
  journal =      j-TEXNIQUES,
  volume =       "5",
  pages =        "71--114",
  month =        aug,
  year =         "1987",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  note =         "Proceedings of the Eighth Annual Meeting of the \TeX{}
                 Users Group",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  ORCID-numbers = "Beebe, Nelson H. F./0000-0001-7281-4263",
}

@TechReport{Beebe:plot79,
  author =       "Nelson H. F. Beebe",
  title =        "A User's Guide to {\PLOT}",
  institution =  "University of Utah",
  year =         "1980",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  ORCID-numbers = "Beebe, Nelson H. F./0000-0001-7281-4263",
}

@Article{Beebe:plot79-biomed,
  author =       "Nelson H. F. Beebe and R. P. C. Rodgers",
  title =        "{\PLOT}: a comprehensive portable {Fortran} scientific
                 line graphics system, as applied to biomedical
                 research",
  journal =      j-CBM,
  volume =       "19",
  number =       "6",
  pages =        "385--402",
  year =         "1989",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  ORCID-numbers = "Beebe, Nelson H. F./0000-0001-7281-4263",
}

@Manual{Beebe:sf3-installation,
  author =       "Nelson H. F. Beebe",
  title =        "{SFTRAN} 3 Installation Guide",
  organization = pub-CLSC,
  address =      pub-CLSC:adr,
  month =        jul,
  year =         "1979",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  ORCID-numbers = "Beebe, Nelson H. F./0000-0001-7281-4263",
}

@Article{Beebe:tex-graphics,
  author =       "Nelson H. F. Beebe",
  title =        "{\TeX{}} and Graphics: The State of the Problem",
  journal =      j-GUTENBERG,
  volume =       "2",
  pages =        "13--53",
  year =         "1989",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  note =         "Presented to: Congr{\`e}s GUTenberg, Paris, France,
                 16--17 May 1989",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  ORCID-numbers = "Beebe, Nelson H. F./0000-0001-7281-4263",
}

@Book{Belcher:1960:QIA,
  author =       "Ronald Belcher and A. J. Nutten",
  title =        "Quantitative Inorganic Analysis",
  publisher =    "Butterworths Scientific Publications",
  address =      "London, England",
  edition =      "Second",
  pages =        "x + 390",
  year =         "1960",
  LCCN =         "QD45 .B45 1960",
  bibdate =      "Sat Jul 25 13:55:27 1998",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  xxISBN =       "none",
}

@Book{Bell:1937:MML,
  author =       "Eric Temple Bell",
  title =        "Men of mathematics: The Lives and Achievements of the
                 Great Mathematicians from {Zeno} to {Poincar{\'e}}",
  publisher =    pub-SIMON-SCHUSTER,
  address =      pub-SIMON-SCHUSTER:adr,
  pages =        "xxi + 592",
  year =         "1937",
  ISBN =         "0-671-62818-6",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-671-62818-5",
  LCCN =         "QA28 .B4",
  bibdate =      "Mon Mar 06 08:47:02 2000",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/bibnet/authors/i/infeld-leopold.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  price =        "US\$17.00",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  tableofcontents = "1. Introduction / 3 \\
                 For the reader's comfort. The beginning of modern
                 mathematics. Are mathematicians human? Witless
                 parodies. Illimitable scope of mathematical evolution.
                 Pioneers and scouts. A clue through the maze.
                 Continuity and discreteness. Remarkable rarity of
                 common sense. Vivid mathematics or vague mysticism?
                 Four great ages of mathematics. Our own the Golden Age.
                 \\
                 \\
                 2. Modern Minds in Ancient Bodies / 19 \\
                 Zeno (fifth century B.C.), Eudoxus (408--355 B.C.),
                 Archimedes (287?--212 B.C.) \\
                 Modern ancients and ancient moderns. Pythagoras, great
                 mystic, greater mathematician. Proof or intuition? The
                 taproot of modern analysis. A bumpkin upsets the
                 philosophers. Zeno's unresolved riddles. Plato's needy
                 young friend. Inexhaustible exhaustion. The useful
                 conics. Archimedes, aristocrat, greatest scientist of
                 antiquity. Legends of his life and personality. His
                 discoveries and claim to modernity. A sturdy Roman.
                 Defeat of Archimedes and triumph of Rome. \\
                 \\
                 3. Gentleman, Soldier, and Mathematician / 35 \\
                 Descartes (1596--1650) \\
                 The good old days. A child philosopher but no prig.
                 Inestimable advantages of lying in bed. Invigorating
                 doubts. Peace in war. Converted by a nightmare.
                 Revelation of analytic geometry. More butchering.
                 Circuses, professional jealousy, swashbuckling,
                 accommodating lady friends. Distaste for hell-fire and
                 respect for the Church. Saved by a brace of cardinals.
                 A Pope brains himself. Twenty years a recluse. The
                 Method. Betrayed by fame. Doting Elisabeth. What
                 Descartes really thought of her. Conceited Christine.
                 What she did to Descartes. Creative simplicity of Ms
                 geometry. \\
                 \\
                 4. The Prince of Amateurs / 56 \\
                 Fermat (1601--1665) \\
                 Greatest mathematician of the seventeenth century.
                 Fermat's busy, practical life. Mathematics his hobby.
                 His flick to the calculus. His profound physical
                 principle. Analytic geometry again. Arithmetica and
                 logistica. Fermat's supremacy in arithmetic. An
                 unsolved problem on primes. Why are some theorems
                 ``important''? An intelligence test. ``Infinite
                 descent.'' Fermat's unanswered challenge to posterity.
                 \\
                 \\
                 5. ``Greatness and Misery of Man'' / 73 \\
                 Pascal (1625--1662) \\
                 An infant prodigy buries his talent. At seventeen a
                 great geometer. Pascal's wonderful theorem. Vile health
                 and religious inebriety. The first calculating
                 Frankenstein. Pascal's brilliance in physics. Holy
                 sister Jacqueline, soul-saver. Wine and women? ``Get
                 thee to a nunnery.!'' Converted on a spree. Literature
                 prostituted to bigotry. The Helen of Geometry. A
                 celestial toothache. What the post-mortem revealed. A
                 gambler makes mathematical history. Scope of the theory
                 of probability. Pascal creates the theory with Fermat.
                 Folly of betting against God or the Devil. \\
                 \\
                 6. On the Seashore / 90 \\
                 Newton (1642--1727) \\
                 Newton's estimate of himself. An uncertified youthful
                 genius. Chaos of his times. On the shoulders of giants.
                 His one attachment. Cambridge days. Young Newton
                 masters futility of suffering fools gladly. The Great
                 Plague a greater blessing. Immortal at twenty four (or
                 less). The calculus. Newton unsurpassed in pure
                 mathematics, supreme in natural philosophy. Gnats,
                 hornets, and exasperation. The Principia. Samuel Pepys
                 and other fussers. The flattest anticlimax in history.
                 Controversy, theology, chronology, alchemy, public
                 office, death. \\
                 \\
                 7. Master of All Trades / 117 \\
                 Leibniz (1646--1716) \\
                 Two superb contributions. A politician's offspring.
                 Genius at fifteen. Seduced by the law. The ``universal
                 characteristic.'' Symbolic reasoning. Sold out to
                 ambition. A master diplomat. Diplomacy being what it
                 is, the diplomatic exploits of the master are left to
                 the historians. Fox into historian, statesman into
                 mathematician. Applied ethics. Existence of God.
                 Optimism. Forty years of futility. Discarded like a
                 dirty rag. \\
                 \\
                 8. Nature or Nurture? / 131 \\
                 The Bernoullis (seventeenth-and eighteenth centuries)
                 \\
                 Eight mathematicians in three generations. Clinical
                 evidence for heredity. The calculus of variations. \\
                 \\
                 9. Analysis Incarnate / 139 \\
                 Euler (1707--1783) \\
                 The most prolific mathematician in history. Snatched
                 from theology. Rulers foot the bills. Practicality of
                 the unpractical. Celestial mechanics and naval warfare.
                 A mathematician by chance and foreordination. Trapped
                 in St. Petersburg. The virtues of silence. Half blind
                 in his morning. Flight to liberal Prussia. Generosity
                 and boorishness of Frederick the Great. Return to
                 hospitable Russia. Generosity and graciousness of
                 Catherine the Great. Total blindness at noon. Master
                 and inspirer of masters for a century. \\
                 \\
                 10. A Lofty Pyramid / 153 \\
                 Lagrange (1736--1813) \\
                 Greatest and most modest mathematician of the
                 eighteenth century. Financial ruin his opportunity.
                 Conceives his masterpiece at nineteen. Magnanimity of
                 Euler. Turin, to Paris, to Berlin: a grateful bastard
                 aids a genius. Conquests in celestial mechanics.
                 Frederick the Great condescends. Absent-minded
                 marriage. Work as a vice. A classic in arithmetic. The
                 M{\'e}canique analytique a living masterpiece. A
                 landmark in the theory of equations. Welcomed in Paris
                 by Marie Antoinette. Nervous exhaustion, melancholia,
                 and universal disgust in middle life. Reawakened by the
                 French Revolution and a young girl. What Lagrange
                 thought of the Revolution. The metric system. What the
                 revolutionists thought of Lagrange. How a philosopher
                 dies. \\
                 \\
                 11. From Peasant to Snob / 172 \\
                 Laplace (1749--1827) \\
                 Humble as Lincoln, proud as Lucifer. A chilly reception
                 and a warm welcome. Laplace grandiosely attacks the
                 solar system. The M{\'e}canique c{\'e}leste. His
                 estimate of himself. What others have thought of him.
                 The ``potential'' fundamental in physics. Laplace in
                 the French Revolution. Intimacy with Napoleon.
                 Laplace's political realism superior to Napoleon's. \\
                 \\
                 12. Friends of an Emperor / 183 \\
                 Monge (1746--1818), Fourier (1768--1830) \\
                 A knife grinder's son and a tailor's boy help Napoleon
                 to upset the aristocrats' applecart. Comic opera in
                 Egypt. Monge's descriptive geometry and the Machine
                 Age. Fourier's analysis and modern physics. Imbecility
                 of trusting in princes or proletarians. Boring to death
                 and bored to death. \\
                 \\
                 13. The Day of Glory / 206 \\
                 Poncelet (1788--1867) \\
                 Resurrected from a Napoleonic shambles. The path of
                 glory leads to jail. Wintering in Russia in 1812. What
                 genius does in prison. Two years of geometry in hell.
                 The rewards of genius: stupidities of routine.
                 Poncelet's projective geometry. Principles of
                 continuity and duality. \\
                 \\
                 14. The Prince of Mathematicians / 218 \\
                 Gauss (1777--1855) \\
                 Gauss the mathematical peer of Archimedes and Newton.
                 Humble origin. Paternal brutality. Unequalled
                 intellectual precocity. His chance, at ten. By twelve
                 he dreams revolutionary discoveries, by eighteen
                 achieves them. The Disquisitiones Arithmeticae. Other
                 epochal works summarized. The Ceres disaster. Napoleon,
                 indirectly robbing Gauss, takes second best.
                 Fundamental advances in all branches of mathematics due
                 to Gauss too numerous for citation: see the account
                 given. A sage of sages. Unwelcome death. \\
                 \\
                 15. Mathematics and Windmills / 270 \\
                 Cauchy (1789--1857) \\
                 Change in nature of mathematics with nineteenth
                 century. Childhood in the French Revolution. Cauchy's
                 early miseducation. Lagrange's prophecy. The young
                 Christian engineer. Prophetic acuteness of Malus. The
                 theory of groups. In the front rank at twenty seven.
                 One of Fermat's enigmas solved. The pious hippopotamus.
                 Butted by Charles the Goat. Memoirs on astronomy and
                 mathematical physics. Sweetness and obstinacy
                 invincible. The French Government makes a fool of
                 itself. Cauchy's place in mathematics. Drawbacks of an
                 irreproachable character. \\
                 \\
                 16. The Copernicus of Geometry / 294 \\
                 Lobatchewsky (1793--1856) \\
                 The widow's mite. Kazan. Appointed professor and spy.
                 Universal ability. Lobatchewsky as an administrator.
                 Reason and incense combat the cholera. Russian
                 gratitude. Humiliated in his prime. Blind as Milton,
                 Lobatchewsky dictates his masterpiece. His advance
                 beyond Euclid. Non--Euclidean geometry. A Copernicus of
                 the intellect. \\
                 \\
                 17. Genius and Poverty / 307 \\
                 Abel ( 1802--1829) \\
                 Norway in 1802. Smothered by clerical fecundity. Abel's
                 awakening. Generosity of a teacher. A pupil of the
                 masters. His lucky blunder. Abel and the quintic. The
                 Government to the rescue. Abel's grand tour of
                 mathematical Europe not so grand. French civility and
                 German cordiality. Crelle and his Journal. Cauchy's
                 unpardonable sin. ``Abel's Theorem.'' Something to keep
                 mathematicians 500 years. Crowning a corpse. \\
                 \\
                 18. The Great Algorist / 327 \\
                 Jacobi (1804--1851) \\
                 Galvanoplastics versus mathematics. Born rich. Jacobi's
                 philological ability. Dedicates himself to mathematics.
                 Early work. Cleaned out. A goose among foxes. Hard
                 times. Elliptic functions. Their place in the general
                 development. Inversion. Work in arithmetic, dynamics,
                 algebra, and Abelian functions. Fourier's
                 pontification. Jacobi's retort. \\
                 \\
                 19. An Irish Tragedy / 340 \\
                 Hamilton (1805--1865) \\
                 Ireland's greatest. Elaborate miseducation. Discoveries
                 at seventeen. A unique university career. Disappointed
                 in love. Hamilton and the poets. Appointed at Dunsink.
                 Systems of rays. The Principia of optics. Prediction of
                 conical refraction. Marriage and alcohol. Fields.
                 Complex numbers. The commutative law repealed.
                 Quaternions. Mountains of paper. \\
                 \\
                 20. Genius and Stupidity / 3662 \\
                 Galois (1811--1832) \\
                 An all-time world record in stupidity. Galois'
                 childhood. The pedagogues surpass themselves, At
                 sixteen Galois repeats Abel's mistake. Politics and
                 education. Examinations as arbiters of genius. Hounded
                 to death by a priest. More academic ineptitude.
                 Absent-minded Cauchy again. Driven to rebellion. A
                 master mathematician at nineteen. ``A carcase to stir
                 up the people.'' The foulest sewer in Paris. Patriots
                 rush to the field of honor. Galois' last night. The
                 riddle of equations solved. Buried like a dog. \\
                 \\
                 21. Invariant Twins / 378 \\
                 Sylvester (1814--1807); Cayley (1821--1895) \\
                 Cayley's contributions. Early life. Cambridge.
                 Recreations. Called to the Bar. Fourteen years in the
                 law. Cayley meets his collaborator. Sylvester's
                 stormier life. Hamstrung by religion. Cayley and
                 Sylvester contrasted. Sylvester's mission to the
                 Virginians. Further false steps. The theory of
                 invariants. Called to Johns Hopkins University.
                 Inextinguishable vitality. ``Rosalind.'' Cayley's
                 unification of geometry. Space of $n$ dimensions.
                 Matrices. Oxford endorses Sylvester. Respectable at
                 last. \\
                 \\
                 22. Master and Pupil / 406 \\
                 Weierstrass (1815--1897); Sonja Kowalewski (1850--1891)
                 \\
                 The father of modern analysis. Relations of Weierstrass
                 to his contemporaries. The penalties of brilliance.
                 Forced into law, forces himself out. Beer and
                 broadswords. A fresh start. Debt to Gudermann. Fifteen
                 years in the mud. Miraculous extrication. Weierstrass'
                 life problem. Too much success. Sonja storms the
                 master. His favorite pupil. Their friendship. A woman's
                 gratitude. Repenting, Sonja wins Paris prize.
                 Weierstrass universally honored. Power series.
                 Arithmetization of analysis. Doubts. \\
                 \\
                 23. Complete Independence / 433 \\
                 Boole (1815--1864) \\
                 British mathematics. Damned at birth by snobbery.
                 Boole's struggle for education. False diagnoses.
                 Providence intervenes. Discovery of invariants. What is
                 algebra? A philosopher attacks a mathematician.
                 Frightful carnage. Boole's chance. ``The Laws of
                 Thought.'' Symbolic logic. Its mathematical
                 significance. Boolean algebra. Dead in his prime. \\
                 \\
                 24. The Man, Not the Method / 448 \\
                 Hermite (1822--1901) \\
                 Old problems and new methods. Hermite's masterful
                 mother. His detestation of examinations. Instructs
                 himself. Higher mathematics sometimes easier than
                 elementary. Educational disasters. Letters to Jacobi. A
                 master at twenty one. Revenge on his examiners. Abelian
                 functions. Pestered by Cauchy. Hermite's mysticism.
                 Solution of the general quintic. Transcendental
                 numbers. A hint to circle-squarers. Hermite's
                 internationalism. \\
                 \\
                 25. The Doubter / 466 \\
                 Kronecker (1823--1891) \\
                 Legend of an American saint. Lucky Kronecker. School
                 triumphs. Great gifts. Algebraic numbers. Battles with
                 Weierstrass. Kronecker's business career. Returns rich
                 to mathematics. The Galois theory. Kronecker's
                 lectures. His skepticism his most original
                 contribution. \\
                 \\
                 26. Anima Candida / 484 \\
                 Riemann (1826--1866) \\
                 Poor but happy. Riemann's chronic shyness. Destined for
                 the church. Saved. A famous hypothesis. Career at
                 G{\"o}ttingen. ``A new mathematic.'' Physical
                 researches. Application of topology to analysis.
                 Epoch-making essay on foundations of geometry. Gauss
                 enthusiastic. The. blessings of poverty. A root of
                 tensor analysis. Quest for health. Under a fig tree.
                 Riemann's landmark in geometry. Curvature of space.
                 Pathbreaking for relativity. \\
                 \\
                 27. Arithmetic the Second / 510 \\
                 Kummer (1810--1893), Dedekind (1831--1916) \\
                 Aged in the wood. Napoleonic warp to Kummer's
                 geniality. Equally gifted in the abstract and the
                 concrete. What Fermat's Last Theorem started. Theory of
                 ideal numbers. Kummer's invention comparable to
                 Lobatchewsky's. Wave surface in four dimensions. Big of
                 body, mind, and heart. Dedekind, last pupil of Gauss.
                 First expositor of Galois. Early interest in science.
                 Turns to mathematics. Dedekind's work on continuity.
                 His creation of the theory of ideals. \\
                 \\
                 28. The Last Universalist / 526 \\
                 Poincar{\'e} (1854--1912) \\
                 Poincar{\'e}'s universality and methods. Childhood
                 setbacks. Seized by mathematics. Keeps his sanity in
                 Franco--Prussian war. Starts as mining engineer. First
                 great work. Automorphic functions. ``The keys of the
                 algebraic cosmos.'' The problem of n bodies. Is Finland
                 civilized? Poincar{\'e}'s new methods in celestial
                 mechanics. Cosmogony. How mathematical discoveries are
                 made. Poincar{\'e}'s account. Forebodings and premature
                 death. \\
                 \\
                 29. Paradise Lost? / 555 \\
                 Cantor (1845--1918) \\
                 Old foes with new faces. Rotting creeds. Cantor's
                 artistic inheritance and father-fixation. Escape, but
                 too late. His revolutionary work gets him nowhere.
                 Academic pettiness. Disastrous consequences of ``safety
                 first.'' An epochal result. Paradox or truth? Infinite
                 existence of transcendentals. Aggressiveness advances,
                 timidity retires. Further spectacular claims. Two types
                 of mathematicians. Insane? counter-revolution. The
                 battle grows fiercer. Cursing the enemy. Universal loss
                 of temper. Where stands mathematics today? And where
                 will it stand tomorrow? lnvictus. \\
                 \\
                 Index / 581",
}

@Book{Bell:1963:MAI,
  author =       "C. F. (Colin Frank) Bell and K. A. K. (Kenneth Alan
                 Keeler) Lott",
  title =        "Modern Approach to Inorganic Chemistry: a textbook for
                 higher national certificate and general degree
                 students",
  publisher =    "Butterworths",
  address =      "London, England",
  pages =        "xi + 295",
  year =         "1963",
  LCCN =         "QD33 .B38 1963",
  bibdate =      "Sat Jul 25 13:55:27 1998",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  xxISBN =       "none",
}

@Book{Bell:1971:CSR,
  editor =       "C. G. Bell and A. Newell",
  title =        "Computer Structures: Readings and Examples",
  publisher =    pub-MCGRAW-HILL,
  address =      pub-MCGRAW-HILL:adr,
  year =         "1971",
  ISBN =         "0-07-004357-4",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-07-004357-2",
  LCCN =         "TK7888.3 .B4",
  bibdate =      "Tue Aug 15 18:20:34 MDT 1995",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/bibnet/authors/v/von-neumann-john.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/bibnet/authors/w/wilkinson-james-hardy.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  libnote =      "Not yet in my library.",
}

@TechReport{Bell:rs6000-tuning,
  author =       "Ron Bell",
  title =        "{IBM RISC System\slash 6000} Performance Tuning for
                 Numerically Intensive {Fortran} and {C} Programs",
  number =       "GG24-3611-00",
  institution =  pub-IBM,
  month =        aug,
  year =         "1990",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Bellamy:1974:ICO,
  author =       "Anthony J. Bellamy",
  title =        "An Introduction to Conservation of Orbital Symmetry",
  publisher =    "Longman Group Limited",
  address =      "London, England",
  pages =        "77",
  year =         "1974",
  ISBN =         "0-582-44089-0",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-582-44089-0",
  LCCN =         "QD476.B363",
  bibdate =      "Mon Jul 27 06:58:31 1998",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  tableofcontents = "Preface / v \\
                 Introduction / ix \\
                 1: Atomic and Molecular Orbitals / 1 \\
                 2: Electrocyclic Reactions: \\
                 Frontier Orbital Approach / 11 \\
                 Orbital Correlation Diagrams / 18 \\
                 3: Cyclo-addition Reactions / 37 \\
                 4: Sigmatropic Migration Reactions / 55 \\
                 5: State Correlation Diagrams / 69 \\
                 Further Reading / 75 \\
                 Index / 77",
}

@Book{Ben-Naim:2008:EDS,
  author =       "Arieh Ben-Naim",
  title =        "Entropy Demystified: The {Second Law} Reduced to Plain
                 Common Sense",
  publisher =    pub-WORLD-SCI,
  address =      pub-WORLD-SCI:adr,
  edition =      "Revised",
  pages =        "xxxi + 225",
  year =         "2008",
  ISBN =         "981-283-225-4",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-981-283-225-2",
  LCCN =         "QC318.E57 B46 2007",
  bibdate =      "Mon Jan 23 18:59:08 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  libnote =      "Not yet in my library.",
  tableofcontents = "Preface: Programs for simulating some of the games
                 in the book \\
                 Introduction, and a short history of the Second Law of
                 Thermodynamics \\
                 A brief introduction to probability theory, information
                 theory, and all the rest \\
                 First let us play with real dice \\
                 Let's play with simplified dice and have a preliminary
                 grasp of the Second Law \\
                 Experience the Second Law with all your five senses \\
                 Finally, grasp it with your common sense \\
                 Translating from the dice-world to the real world \\
                 Reflections on the status of the Second Law of
                 Thermodynamics as a law of physics",
}

@Book{Bennett:1933:CFC,
  editor =       "H. Bennett",
  title =        "The Chemical Formulary: a Condensed Collection of
                 Valuable, Timely, Practical Formulae for Making
                 Thousands of Products in All Fields of Industry",
  volume =       "1",
  publisher =    "Chemical Publishing Co., Inc.",
  address =      "New York, NY, USA",
  pages =        "x + 604",
  year =         "1933",
  LCCN =         "TP151 .B439",
  bibdate =      "Sat Jul 25 13:55:27 1998",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  xxISBN =       "none",
}

@Book{Bennett:1935:CFC,
  editor =       "H. Bennett",
  title =        "The Chemical Formulary: a Condensed Collection of
                 Valuable, Timely, Practical Formulae for Making
                 Thousands of Products in All Fields of Industry",
  volume =       "2",
  publisher =    "Chemical Publishing Co., Inc.",
  address =      "New York, NY, USA",
  pages =        "ix + 570",
  year =         "1935",
  LCCN =         "TP151 .B439",
  bibdate =      "Sat Jul 25 13:55:27 1998",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  xxISBN =       "none",
}

@Book{Bentley:1982:WEP,
  author =       "Jon Louis Bentley",
  title =        "Writing Efficient Programs",
  publisher =    pub-PH,
  address =      pub-PH:adr,
  pages =        "xvi + 170",
  year =         "1982",
  ISBN =         "0-13-970251-2 (hardcover), 0-13-970244-X (paperback)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-13-970251-8 (hardcover), 978-0-13-970244-0
                 (paperback)",
  LCCN =         "QA76.6 .B455 1982",
  bibdate =      "Tue Dec 14 22:40:54 1993",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  price =        "US\$22.95 (hardcover), US\$14.95 (paperback)",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Bentley:1986:PP,
  author =       "Jon Louis Bentley",
  title =        "Programming Pearls",
  publisher =    pub-AW,
  address =      pub-AW:adr,
  pages =        "viii + 195",
  year =         "1986",
  ISBN =         "0-201-10331-1 (paperback)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-201-10331-1 (paperback)",
  LCCN =         "QA76.6.B453 1986",
  bibdate =      "Wed Dec 15 08:16:02 1993",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/bibnet/subjects/acc-stab-num-alg.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/bibnet/subjects/han-wri-mat-sci-2ed.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/css.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/spell.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/string-matching.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/unix.bib",
  note =         "Reprinted with corrections.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  remark =       "Chapter 13, A Spelling Checker, discusses the design
                 and implementation of Unix spell, and notes that
                 ``Steve Johnson wrote the first version of {\tt spell}
                 in an afternoon in 1975.''.",
  shorttableofcontents = "1: Cracking the oyster \\
                 2: Aha! algorithms \\
                 3: Data structures programs \\
                 4: Writing correct programs \\
                 5: Perspective on performance \\
                 6: Back of the envelope \\
                 7: Algorithm design techniques \\
                 8: Code tuning \\
                 9: Squeezing space \\
                 10: Sorting \\
                 11: Searching \\
                 12: Heaps \\
                 13: Spelling checker",
  tableofcontents = "Part I: Preliminaries / 1 \\
                 Column 1: Cracking the Oyster / 3 \\
                 A Friendly Conversation \\
                 Precise Problem Statement \\
                 Program Design \\
                 Implementation Sketch \\
                 Principles \\
                 Problems \\
                 Further Reading \\
                 Column 2: Aha! Algorithms / 11 \\
                 Three Problems \\
                 Ubiquitous Binary Search \\
                 The Power of Primitives \\
                 Getting It Together: Sorting \\
                 Principles \\
                 Problems \\
                 Further Reading \\
                 Implementing an Anagram Program \\
                 Column 3: Data Structures Programs / 23 \\
                 A Survey Program \\
                 Form Letters \\
                 An Array of Examples \\
                 A Big Program \\
                 Principles \\
                 Problems \\
                 Further Reading \\
                 Column 4: Writing Correct Programs / 35 \\
                 The Challenge of Binary Search \\
                 Writing the Program \\
                 Understanding the Program \\
                 Implementing the Program \\
                 Principles \\
                 The Roles of Program Verification \\
                 Problems \\
                 Further Reading \\
                 Industrial-Strength Program Verification \\
                 Part II: Performance / 49 \\
                 Column 5: Perspective on Performance / 51 \\
                 A Case Study \\
                 Design Levels \\
                 Principles \\
                 Problems \\
                 Further Reading \\
                 Column 6: The Back of the Envelope / 59 \\
                 Basic Skills \\
                 Quick Calculations in Computing \\
                 Safety Factors \\
                 A Case Study \\
                 Principles \\
                 Problems \\
                 Further Reading \\
                 Quick Calculations in Everyday Life \\
                 Column 7: Algorithm Design Techniques / 69 \\
                 The Problem and a Simple Algorithm \\
                 Two Quadratic Algorithms \\
                 A Divide-and-Conquer Algorithm \\
                 A Scanning Algorithm \\
                 What Does It Matter? \\
                 Principles \\
                 Problems \\
                 Further Reading \\
                 The Impact of Algorithms \\
                 Column 8: Code Tuning / 81 \\
                 A Typical Story \\
                 A First Aid Quiz \\
                 Major Surgery --- Binary Search \\
                 Principles \\
                 Problems \\
                 Further Reading \\
                 Tuning the Federal Government's COBOL Code \\
                 Column 9: Squeezing Space / 93 \\
                 The Key --- Simplicity \\
                 Data Space \\
                 Code Space \\
                 Principles \\
                 Problems \\
                 Further Reading \\
                 Two Big Squeezes \\
                 Part III: The Product / 105 \\
                 Column 10: Sorting / 107 \\
                 Insertion Sort --- An $O(N^2)$ Algorithm \\
                 Quicksort --- An $O(N \log N)$ Algorithm \\
                 Principles \\
                 Problems \\
                 Further Reading \\
                 Column 11: Searching / 117 \\
                 The Problem \\
                 One Solution \\
                 The Design Space \\
                 Principles \\
                 Problems \\
                 Further Reading \\
                 Column 12: Heaps / 125 \\
                 The Data Structure \\
                 Two Critical Routines \\
                 Priority Queues \\
                 A Sorting Algorithm \\
                 Principles \\
                 Problems \\
                 Further Reading \\
                 Column 13: A Spelling Checker / 139 \\
                 A Simple Program \\
                 The Design Space \\
                 A Subtle Program \\
                 Principles \\
                 Problems \\
                 Further Reading \\
                 Why Spelling is Hard \\
                 Epilog / 151 \\
                 Appendix: Catalog of Algorithms / 155 \\
                 Hints for Selected Problems / 159 \\
                 Solutions to Selected Problems / 163 \\
                 Index / 189",
}

@Book{Bentley:1988:MPP,
  author =       "Jon Louis Bentley",
  title =        "More Programming Pearls: Confessions of a Coder",
  publisher =    pub-AW,
  address =      pub-AW:adr,
  pages =        "viii + 207",
  year =         "1988",
  ISBN =         "0-201-11889-0",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-201-11889-6",
  LCCN =         "QA76.6 .B452 1988",
  bibdate =      "Sun Dec 04 12:36:49 1994",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/bibnet/subjects/acc-stab-num-alg.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/bibnet/subjects/han-wri-mat-sci-2ed.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/css.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/unix.bib",
  price =        "US\$18.75",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  shorttableofcontents = "Part I: Programming Techniques / 1 \\
                 Column 1: Profilers / 3 \\
                 Column 2: Associative Arrays / 15 \\
                 Column 3: Confessions of a Coder / 27 \\
                 Column 4: Self-Describing Data / 37 \\
                 Part II: Tricks of the Trade / 45 \\
                 Column 5: Cutting the Gordian Knot / 47 \\
                 Column 6: Bumper-Sticker Computer Science / 57 \\
                 Column 7: The Envelope is Back / 69 \\
                 Column 8: The Furbelow Memorandum / 77 \\
                 Part III: I/O Fit for Humans / 81 \\
                 Column 9: Little Languages / 83 \\
                 Column 10: Document Design / 101 \\
                 Column 11: Graphic Output / 115 \\
                 Column 12: A Survey of Surveys / 127 \\
                 Part IV: Algorithms \\
                 Column 13: A Sample of Brilliance / 139 \\
                 Column 14: Birth of a Cruncher / 147 \\
                 Column 15: Selection / 159 \\
                 Appendix 1: The C and Awk Languages / 171 \\
                 Appendix 2: A Subroutine Library / 175 \\
                 Solutions to Selected Problems / 183 \\
                 Index / 203",
  tableofcontents = "Part I: Programming Techniques / 1 \\
                 Column 1: Profilers / 3 \\
                 Computing Primes \\
                 Using Profilers \\
                 A Specialized Profiler \\
                 Building Profilers \\
                 Principles \\
                 Problems \\
                 Further Reading \\
                 Column 2: Associative Arrays / 15 \\
                 Associative Arrays in Awk \\
                 A Finite State Machine Simulator \\
                 Topological Sorting \\
                 Principles \\
                 Problems \\
                 Further Reading \\
                 Column 3: Confessions of a Coder / 27 \\
                 Binary Search \\
                 Selection \\
                 A Subroutine Library \\
                 Principles \\
                 Problems \\
                 Column 4: Self-Describing Data / 37 \\
                 Name-Value Pairs \\
                 Provenances in Programming \\
                 A Sorting Lab \\
                 Principles \\
                 Problems \\
                 Part II: Tricks of the Trade / 45 \\
                 Column 5: Cutting the Gordian Knot / 47 \\
                 A Quiz \\
                 Some Solutions \\
                 Hints \\
                 Principles \\
                 Problems \\
                 Further Reading \\
                 Debugging \\
                 Column 6: Bumper-Sticker Computer Science / 57 \\
                 Coding \\
                 User Interfaces \\
                 Debugging \\
                 Performance \\
                 Documentation \\
                 Managing Software \\
                 Miscellaneous Rules \\
                 Principles \\
                 Problems \\
                 Further Reading \\
                 Column 7: The Envelope is Back / 69 \\
                 A Warm-Up for Cool Brains \\
                 Performance Rules of Thumb \\
                 Little's Law \\
                 Principles \\
                 Problems \\
                 Further Reading \\
                 Quick Calculations in Everyday Life \\
                 Column 8: The Furbelow Memorandum / 77 \\
                 The Memo \\
                 Principles \\
                 Further Reading \\
                 Part III: I/O Fit for Humans / 81 \\
                 Column 9: Little Languages / 83 \\
                 The Pic Language \\
                 Perspective \\
                 Pic Preprocessors \\
                 Little Languages for Implementing Pic \\
                 Principles \\
                 Problems \\
                 Further Reading \\
                 Column 10: Document Design / 101 \\
                 Tables \\
                 Three Design Principles \\
                 Figures \\
                 Text \\
                 The Right Medium \\
                 Principles \\
                 Problems \\
                 Further Reading \\
                 A Catalog of Pet Peeves \\
                 Column 11: Graphic Output / 115 \\
                 A Case Study \\
                 A Sampler of Displays \\
                 Principles \\
                 Problems \\
                 Further Reading \\
                 Napoleon's March to Moscow \\
                 Column 12: A Survey of Surveys / 127 \\
                 The Problems of Polling \\
                 The Languages \\
                 The Pictures \\
                 Principles \\
                 Problems \\
                 Part IV: Algorithms \\
                 Column 13: A Sample of Brilliance / 139 \\
                 A Sampling of Sampling Algorithms \\
                 Floyd's Algorithm \\
                 Random Permutations \\
                 Principles \\
                 Problems \\
                 Further Reading \\
                 Column 14: Birth of a Cruncher / 147 \\
                 The Problem \\
                 Newton Iteration \\
                 A Great Place to Start \\
                 The Code \\
                 Principles \\
                 Problems \\
                 Further Reading \\
                 A Big Success Story \\
                 Column 15: Selection / 159 \\
                 The Problem \\
                 The Program \\
                 Analysis of Run Time \\
                 Principles \\
                 Problems \\
                 Further Reading \\
                 Appendix 1: The C and Awk Languages / 171 \\
                 Appendix 2: A Subroutine Library / 175 \\
                 Solutions to Selected Problems / 183 \\
                 Index / 203",
}

@Book{Bentley:2000:PP,
  author =       "Jon Louis Bentley",
  title =        "Programming Pearls",
  publisher =    pub-AW,
  address =      pub-AW:adr,
  edition =      "Second",
  pages =        "xi + 239",
  year =         "2000",
  ISBN =         "0-201-65788-0 (paperback), 0-13-449802-X (e-book),
                 0-13-449805-4",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-201-65788-3 (paperback), 978-0-13-449802-7
                 (e-book), 978-0-13-449805-8",
  LCCN =         "QA76.6 .B454 2000",
  bibdate =      "Fri Jul 12 17:17:23 2002",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/css.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/string-matching.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/unix.bib",
  price =        "US\$24.95",
  abstract =     "Just as natural pearls grow from grains of sand that
                 irritate oysters, programming pearls have grown from
                 real problems that have irritated real programmers.
                 With origins beyond solid engineering, in the realm of
                 insight and creativity, Bentley's pearls offer unique
                 and clever solutions to those nagging problems.
                 Illustrated by programs designed as much for fun as for
                 instruction, the book is filled with lucid and witty
                 descriptions of practical programming techniques and
                 fundamental design principles. It is not at all
                 surprising that \booktitle{Programming Pearls} has been
                 so highly valued by programmers at every level of
                 experience.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  shorttableofcontents = "Part I: Preliminaries / 1 \\
                 Column 1: Cracking the Oyster / 3 \\
                 Column 2: Aha! Algorithms / 11 \\
                 Column 3: Data Structures Programs / 21 \\
                 Column 4: Writing Correct Programs / 33 \\
                 Column 5: A Small Matter of Programming / 45 \\
                 Part II: Performance / 59 \\
                 Column 6: Perspective on Performance / 61 \\
                 Column 7: The Back of the Envelope / 67 \\
                 Column 8: Algorithm Design Techniques / 77 \\
                 Column 9: Code Tuning / 87 \\
                 Column 10: Squeezing Space / 99 \\
                 Part III: The Product / 113 \\
                 Column 11: Sorting / 115 \\
                 Column 12: A Sample Problem / 125 \\
                 Column 13: Searching / 133 \\
                 Column 14: Heaps / 147 \\
                 Column 15: Strings of Pearls / 161 \\
                 Epilog to the First Edition / 175 \\
                 Epilog to the Second Edition / 177 \\
                 Appendix 1: A Catalog of Algorithms / 179 \\
                 Appendix 2: An Estimation Quiz / 183 \\
                 Appendix 3: Cost Models for Time and Space / 185 \\
                 Appendix 4: Rules for Code Tuning / 191 \\
                 Appendix 5: C++ Classes for Searching / 197 \\
                 Hints for Selected Problems / 201 \\
                 Solutions to Selected Problems / 205 \\
                 Index / 233",
  tableofcontents = "Part I: Preliminaries / 1 \\
                 Column 1: Cracking the Oyster / 3 \\
                 A Friendly Conversation \\
                 Precise Problem Statement \\
                 Program Design \\
                 Implementation Sketch \\
                 Principles \\
                 Problems \\
                 Further Reading \\
                 Column 2: Aha! Algorithms / 11 \\
                 Three Problems \\
                 Ubiquitous Binary Search \\
                 The Power of Primitives \\
                 Getting It Together: Sorting \\
                 Principles \\
                 Problems \\
                 Further Reading \\
                 Implementing an Anagram Program \\
                 Column 3: Data Structures Programs / 21 \\
                 A Survey Program \\
                 Form-Letter Programming \\
                 An Array of Examples \\
                 Structuring Data \\
                 Powerful Tools for Specialized Data \\
                 Principles \\
                 Problems \\
                 Further Reading \\
                 Column 4: Writing Correct Programs / 33 \\
                 The Challenge of Binary Search \\
                 Writing the Program \\
                 Understanding the Program \\
                 Principles \\
                 The Roles of Program Verification \\
                 Problems \\
                 Further Reading \\
                 Column 5: A Small Matter of Programming / 45 \\
                 From Pseudocode to C \\
                 A Test Harness \\
                 The Art of Assertion \\
                 Automated Testing \\
                 Timing \\
                 The Complete Program \\
                 Principles \\
                 Problems \\
                 Further Reading \\
                 Debugging \\
                 Part II: Performance / 59 \\
                 Column 6: Perspective on Performance / 61 \\
                 A Case Study \\
                 Design Levels \\
                 Principles \\
                 Problems \\
                 Further Reading \\
                 Column 7: The Back of the Envelope / 67 \\
                 Basic Skills \\
                 Performance Estimates Safety Factors \\
                 Little's Law \\
                 Principles \\
                 Problems \\
                 Further Reading \\
                 Quick Calculations in Everyday Life \\
                 Column 8: Algorithm Design Techniques / 77 \\
                 The Problem and a Simple Algorithm \\
                 Two Quadratic Algorithms \\
                 A Divide-and-Conquer Algorithm \\
                 A Scanning Algorithm \\
                 What Does It Matter? \\
                 Principles \\
                 Problems \\
                 Further Reading \\
                 Column 9: Code Tuning / 87 \\
                 A Typical Story \\
                 A First Aid Sampler \\
                 Major Surgery --- Binary Search \\
                 Principles \\
                 Problems \\
                 Further Reading \\
                 Column 10: Squeezing Space / 99 \\
                 The Key --- Simplicity \\
                 An Illustrative Problem \\
                 Techniques for Data Space \\
                 Techniques for Code Space \\
                 Principles \\
                 Problems \\
                 Further Reading \\
                 A Big Squeeze \\
                 Part III: The Product / 113 \\
                 Column 11: Sorting / 115 \\
                 Insertion Sort \\
                 A Simple Quicksort \\
                 Better Quicksorts \\
                 Principles \\
                 Problems \\
                 Further Reading \\
                 Column 12: A Sample Problem / 125 \\
                 The Problem \\
                 One Solution \\
                 The Design Space \\
                 Principles \\
                 Problems \\
                 Further Reading \\
                 Column 13: Searching / 133 \\
                 The Interface \\
                 Linear Structures \\
                 Binary Search Trees \\
                 Structures for Integers \\
                 Principles \\
                 Problems Further Reading \\
                 A Real Searching Problem \\
                 Column 14: Heaps / 147 \\
                 The Data Structure \\
                 Two Critical Functions \\
                 Priority Queues \\
                 A Sorting Algorithm \\
                 Principles \\
                 Problems \\
                 Further Reading \\
                 Column 15: Strings of Pearls / 161 \\
                 Words \\
                 Phrases \\
                 Generating Text \\
                 Principles \\
                 Problems \\
                 Further Reading \\
                 Epilog to the First Edition / 175 \\
                 Epilog to the Second Edition / 177 \\
                 Appendix 1: A Catalog of Algorithms / 179 \\
                 Appendix 2: An Estimation Quiz / 183 \\
                 Appendix 3: Co~t; Models for Time and Space / 185 \\
                 Appendix 4: Rules for Code Tuning / 191 \\
                 Appendix 5: C++ Classes for Searching / 197 \\
                 Hints for Selected Problems / 201 \\
                 Solutions to Selected Problems / 205 \\
                 Index / 233",
}

@Article{Bentley:grap,
  author =       "Jon Louis Bentley and Brian W. Kernighan",
  title =        "{GRAP}: {A} Language for typesetting graphs",
  journal =      j-CACM,
  volume =       "29",
  number =       "8",
  pages =        "782--792",
  month =        aug,
  year =         "1986",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Article{Bentley:mini-macro-processor,
  author =       "Jon Bentley",
  title =        "m1: a Mini Macro Processor",
  journal =      j-COMP-LANG-MAG,
  volume =       "7",
  number =       "6",
  pages =        "47--61",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "1990",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Article{Bentley:pic,
  author =       "Jon Louis Bentley",
  title =        "Programming Pearls: Little Languages",
  journal =      j-CACM,
  volume =       "29",
  number =       "8",
  pages =        "711--721",
  month =        aug,
  year =         "1986",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  note =         "Description of the {\em pic\/} language.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Berger:2015:IBL,
  author =       "Arno Berger and Theodore P. Hill",
  title =        "An introduction to {Benford's Law}",
  publisher =    pub-PRINCETON,
  address =      pub-PRINCETON:adr,
  pages =        "viii + 248",
  year =         "2015",
  DOI =          "https://doi.org/10.1515/9781400866588",
  ISBN =         "0-691-16306-5, 1-4008-6658-8 (e-book)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-691-16306-2, 978-1-4008-6658-8 (e-book)",
  LCCN =         "QA273.6 .B474 2015",
  bibdate =      "Fri Jan 22 12:19:25 MST 2016",
  bibsource =    "fsz3950.oclc.org:210/WorldCat;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/benfords-law.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  URL =          "http://site.ebrary.com/id/11040167;
                 http://www.degruyter.com/viewbooktoc/product/465875",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  subject =      "Distribution; Probability measures",
  tableofcontents = "Preface / vii 1 Introduction / 1 \\
                 1.1 History / 3 \\
                 1.2 Empirical evidence / 4 \\
                 1.3 Early explanations / 6 \\
                 1.4 Mathematical framework / 7 \\
                 2 Significant Digits and the Significand / 11 \\
                 2.1 Significant digits / 11 \\
                 2.2 The significand / 12 \\
                 2.3 The significand s-algebra / 14 \\
                 3 The Benford Property / 22 \\
                 3.1 Benford sequences / 23 \\
                 3.2 Benford functions / 28 \\
                 3.3 Benford distributions and random variables / 29 \\
                 4 The Uniform Distribution and Benford's Law / 43 \\
                 4.1 Uniform distribution characterization of Benford's
                 law / 43 \\
                 4.2 Uniform distribution of sequences and functions /
                 46 \\
                 4.3 Uniform distribution of random variables / 54 \\
                 5 Scale-, Base-, and Sum-Invariance / 63 \\
                 5.1 The scale-invariance property / 63 \\
                 5.2 The base-invariance property / 74 \\
                 5.3 The sum-invariance property / 80 \\
                 6 Real-valued Deterministic Processes / 90 \\
                 6.1 Iteration of functions / 90 \\
                 6.2 Sequences with polynomial growth / 93 \\
                 6.3 Sequences with exponential growth / 97 \\
                 6.4 Sequences with super-exponential growth / 101 \\
                 6.5 An application to Newton's method / 111 \\
                 6.6 Time-varying systems / 116 \\
                 6.7 Chaotic systems: Two examples / 124 \\
                 6.8 Differential equations / 127 \\
                 7 Multi-dimensional Linear Processes / 135 \\
                 7.1 Linear processes, observables, and difference
                 equations / 135 \\
                 7.2 Nonnegative matrices / 139 \\
                 7.3 General matrices / 145 \\
                 7.4 An application to Markov chains / 162 \\
                 7.5 Linear difference equations / 165 \\
                 7.6 Linear differential equations / 170 \\
                 8 Real-valued Random Processes / 180 \\
                 8.1 Convergence of random variables to Benford's law /
                 180 \\
                 8.2 Powers, products, and sums of random variables /
                 182 \\
                 8.3 Mixtures of distributions / 202 \\
                 8.4 Random maps / 213 \\
                 9 Finitely Additive Probability and Benford's Law / 216
                 \\
                 9.1 Finitely additive probabilities / 217 \\
                 9.2 Finitely additive Benford probabilities / 219 \\
                 10 Applications of Benford's Law / 223 \\
                 10.1 Fraud detection / 224 \\
                 10.2 Detection of natural phenomena / 225 \\
                 10.3 Diagnostics and design / 226 \\
                 10.4 Computations and Computer Science / 228 \\
                 10.5 Pedagogical tool / 230 \\
                 List of Symbols / 231 \\
                 Bibliography / 234 \\
                 Index / 245",
}

@Book{Berger:2017:AHA,
  author =       "Lee R. Berger and John (John David) Hawks",
  title =        "Almost Human: the Astonishing Tale of \bioname{Homo
                 Naledi} and the Discovery That Changed Our Human
                 Story",
  publisher =    "National Geographic",
  address =      "Washington, DC, USA",
  pages =        "239",
  year =         "2017",
  ISBN =         "1-4262-1811-7 (hardcover)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-1-4262-1811-8 (hardcover)",
  LCCN =         "GN284.5 .B47 2017",
  bibdate =      "Sat Dec 23 08:54:30 MST 2017",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/gnu.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 z3950.loc.gov:7090/Voyager",
  abstract =     "This first-person narrative about an archaeological
                 discovery is rewriting the story of human evolution. A
                 story of defiance and determination by a controversial
                 scientist, this is Lee Berger's own take on finding
                 \bioname{Homo naledi}, an all-new species on the human
                 family tree and one of the greatest discoveries of the
                 21st century. In 2013, Berger, a National Geographic
                 Explorer-in-Residence, caught wind of a cache of bones
                 in a hard-to-reach underground cave in South Africa. He
                 put out a call around the world for petite
                 collaborators--men and women small and adventurous
                 enough to be able to squeeze through 8-inch tunnels to
                 reach a sunless cave 40 feet underground. With this
                 team of ``underground astronauts,'' Berger made the
                 discovery of a lifetime: hundreds of prehistoric bones,
                 including entire skeletons of at least 15 individuals,
                 all perhaps two million years old. Their features
                 combined those of known prehominids like Lucy, the
                 famous Australopithecus, with those more human than
                 anything ever before seen in prehistoric remains.
                 Berger's team had discovered an all new species, and
                 they called it \bioname{Homo naledi}. The cave quickly
                 proved to be the richest primitive hominid site ever
                 discovered, full of implications that shake the very
                 foundation of how we define what makes us human. Did
                 this species come before, during, or after the
                 emergence of \bioname{Homo sapiens} on our evolutionary
                 tree? How did the cave come to contain nothing but the
                 remains of these individuals? Did they bury their dead?
                 If so, they must have had a level of self-knowledge,
                 including an awareness of death. And yet those are the
                 very characteristics used to define what makes us
                 human. Did an equally advanced species inhabit Earth
                 with us, or before us? Berger does not hesitate to
                 address all these questions. Berger is a charming and
                 controversial figure, and some colleagues question his
                 interpretation of this and other finds. But in these
                 pages, this charismatic and visionary paleontologist
                 counters their arguments and tells his personal story:
                 a rich and readable narrative about science,
                 exploration, and what it means to be human. A story of
                 defiance and determination by a controversial
                 scientist, this is Lee Berger's own take on finding
                 \bioname{Homo naledi}, an all-new species on the human
                 family tree and one of the greatest discoveries of the
                 21st century.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  remark =       "Although this book says nothing about open-source
                 software, it says a good bit in favor of open-source
                 research findings, including the free sharing of
                 sub-millimeter accurate 3-D models of fossils.",
  subject =      "Homo naledi; Human beings; Origin; Evolution; Human
                 remains (Archaeology); South Africa; Witwatersrand
                 Region; SOCIAL SCIENCE / Anthropology / Physical;
                 HISTORY / Expeditions and Discoveries; SCIENCE /
                 Paleontology",
  tableofcontents = "Prologue \\
                 Going to South Africa \\
                 Finding Sediba \\
                 Finding Naledi \\
                 Understanding Naledi \\
                 Epilogue \\
                 Project participants, 2008--2015",
}

@Book{Berggren:2000:PSB,
  author =       "Lennart Berggren and Jonathan Borwein and Peter
                 Borwein",
  title =        "Pi: a source book",
  publisher =    pub-SV,
  address =      pub-SV:adr,
  edition =      "Second",
  pages =        "xx + 736",
  year =         "2000",
  DOI =          "https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4757-3240-5",
  ISBN =         "0-387-98946-3 (hardcover)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-387-98946-4 (hardcover)",
  LCCN =         "QA484 .P5 2000",
  MRclass =      "11-00 (01A05 01A75 11-03)",
  MRnumber =     "1746004",
  bibdate =      "Wed Aug 10 11:09:47 2016",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/bibnet/authors/b/borwein-jonathan-m.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/agm.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/mathcw.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/pi.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  libnote =      "Not yet in my library.",
  ORCID-numbers = "Borwein, Jonathan/0000-0002-1263-0646",
  subject =      "Pi (mathematical constant)",
  tableofcontents = "Preface \\
                 Acknowledgements \\
                 Introduction \\
                 The Rhind Mathematical Papyrus-Problem 50 \\
                 Engles / Quadrature of the Circle in Ancient Egypt \\
                 Archimedes / Measurement of a Circle \\
                 Phillips / Archimedes the Numerical Analyst \\
                 Lam \& Ang / Circle Measurements in Ancient China \\
                 The Banu Musa: The Measurement of Plane and Solid
                 Figures \\
                 Madhava's / The Power Series for Arctan and Pi \\
                 Hope-Jones / Ludolph van Ceulen \\
                 Vi{\`e}te / Variorum de Revus Mathematicis Reponsorum
                 Liber VII \\
                 Wallis / Computation of Pi by Successive Interpolations
                 \\
                 Wallis / Arithmetica Infinitorum \\
                 Huygens / De Circuli Magnitudine Inventa \\
                 Gregory / Correspondence with John Collins \\
                 Jones / The First Use of Pi for the Circle Ratio \\
                 Newton / Of The Method of Fluxions and Infinite Series
                 \\
                 Euler / Chapter 10 of Introduction to Analysis of the
                 Infinite \\
                 Lambert / M{\'e}moire Sur Quelques Propri{\'e}t{\'e}s
                 Remarquables Des Quantit{\'e}s Transcendentes
                 Circulaires et Logarithmiques \\
                 Lambert / Irrationality of Pi \\
                 Shanks / Contributions to Mathematics Comprising
                 Chiefly of the Rectification of the Circle to 607
                 Places of Decimals \\
                 Hermite / Sur La Fonction Exponentielle",
}

@Misc{Bergman:2006:BRE,
  author =       "Aaron Bergman",
  title =        "Book Review: {{\em Not Even Wrong: The Failure of
                 String Theory and the Continuing Challenge to Unify the
                 Laws of Physics}, Peter Woit, Jonathan Cape, London
                 2006}",
  howpublished = "World Wide Web document",
  pages =        "11",
  day =          "18",
  month =        aug,
  year =         "2006",
  bibdate =      "Mon Oct 09 11:38:47 2006",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/einstein.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  URL =          "http://zippy.ph.utexas.edu/~abergman/Review.pdf",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  remark =       "Critical review and rebuttal of Woit's book.",
}

@Book{Bergmann:1968:RG,
  author =       "Peter Gabriel Bergmann",
  title =        "The riddle of gravitation",
  publisher =    "Scribner",
  address =      "New York, NY, USA",
  pages =        "xvi + 270",
  year =         "1968",
  LCCN =         "QC6 .B454",
  bibdate =      "Fri Aug 8 06:59:44 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/einstein.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 z3950.loc.gov:7090/Voyager",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  subject =      "Relativity (Physics); Gravitation",
  tableofcontents = "Introduction: The Scope of Gravitation / 3 \\
                 I / Newtonian Physics and Special Relativity 1 Early
                 History / 9 \\
                 2 Relativity of Motion / 19 \\
                 3 The Universal Speed of Light / 25 \\
                 4 The Special Theory of Relativity / 30 \\
                 5 Minkowski's Four-dimensional World / 39 \\
                 / 6 Mass, Energy, Momentum / 54 \\
                 7 Flat Space Curved Space / 65 \\
                 II / General Relativity 8Relativity and Gravitation /
                 77 \\
                 9 The Relativity of Free Fall / 84 \\
                 10 The Principle of General Covariance / 93 \\
                 11 Curved Space-Time / 98 \\
                 12 Gravitation in the Space-Time Continuum / 104 \\
                 13 Schwarzschild's Solution / 114 \\
                 14 Inside the Schwarzschild Radius / 126 \\
                 15 Event Horizons / 132 \\
                 III / Recent Developments 16 Gravitational Collapse /
                 157 \\
                 17 Gravitational Radiation / 162 \\
                 18 The Search for Gravitational Waves / 168 \\
                 19 Cosmology / 172 \\
                 20 Current Observational Programs / 184 \\
                 21 Particle Motion / 192 \\
                 22 Quantum Theory of Gravitation / 197 \\
                 23 What Is an Observable? / 201 \\
                 24 Space-Time Today and Tomorrow / 206 \\
                 Appendixes I The Equal-Areas Law of Kepler / 213 \\
                 II Derivation of the Inverse-Square Law of Force / 216
                 \\
                 III The Lorentz Transformation / 219 \\
                 IV The Schwarzschild Radius / 226 \\
                 V Gravitational Radiation / 229 \\
                 VI Powers of 10 and Units of Measurement / 233 \\
                 Glossary / 235 \\
                 Suggestions for Further Reading / 261 \\
                 Index / 265",
}

@Article{Bergstrom:2004:CBL,
  author =       "Carl T. Bergstrom and Theodore C. Bergstrom",
  title =        "The costs and benefits of library site licenses to
                 academic journals",
  journal =      j-PROC-NATL-ACAD-SCI-USA,
  volume =       "101",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "897--902",
  day =          "20",
  month =        jan,
  year =         "2004",
  CODEN =        "PNASA6",
  DOI =          "https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0305628101",
  ISSN =         "0027-8424 (print), 1091-6490 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Wed Nov 16 05:35:58 2005",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  URL =          "http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/abstract/0305628101v1",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Berlin:2005:MBM,
  author =       "Leslie Berlin",
  title =        "The Man Behind the Microchip: {Robert Noyce} and the
                 Invention of {Silicon Valley}",
  publisher =    pub-OXFORD,
  address =      pub-OXFORD:adr,
  pages =        "xi + 402",
  year =         "2005",
  ISBN =         "0-19-516343-5",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-19-516343-8",
  LCCN =         "TK7807.N69 B47 2005",
  bibdate =      "Tue Oct 11 05:00:44 MDT 2005",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 z3950.loc.gov:7090/Voyager",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  keywords =     "Fairchild Semiconductor Corporation; integrated
                 circuit (co-invented with Jack Kilby (1923--2005) of
                 Texas Instruments; Intel Corporation; Nobel Prize in
                 Physics 2000); Shockley Semiconductor Laboratories",
  subject =      "Noyce, Robert N.; Electronics engineers; United
                 States; Biography; Santa Clara Valley (Santa Clara
                 County, Calif.); History",
  subject-dates = "1927--1990",
  tableofcontents = "Adrenaline and Gasoline \\
                 Rapid Robert \\
                 Apprenticeship \\
                 Breakaway \\
                 Invention \\
                 A Strange Little Upstart \\
                 Startup \\
                 Takeoff \\
                 The Edge of What's Barely Possible \\
                 Renewal \\
                 Political Entrepreneurship \\
                 Public Startup \\
                 Author's Interviews and Correspondence \\
                 Robert Noyce's Patents",
}

@Book{Berman:2011:SHO,
  author =       "Bob Berman",
  title =        "The {Sun}'s heartbeat: and other stories from the life
                 of the star that powers our planet",
  publisher =    "Little, Brown and Company",
  address =      "New York, NY, USA",
  pages =        "viii + 290",
  year =         "2011",
  ISBN =         "0-316-09101-4",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-316-09101-5",
  LCCN =         "QB521.4 .B47 2011",
  bibdate =      "Fri Jul 22 15:57:25 MDT 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 z3950.loc.gov:7090/Voyager",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  subject =      "Sun; Popular works",
  tableofcontents = "Yon flaming orb \\
                 Genesis \\
                 A strange history of seeing spots \\
                 The heartbeat stops and other peculiar events \\
                 The unit \\
                 Magnetic attraction \\
                 Wild science of the bearded men \\
                 Cautionary tales \\
                 Why Jack loved carbon \\
                 Tales of the invisible \\
                 The sun brings death \\
                 The sun will save your life \\
                 I'm an aquarius. Trust me \\
                 Rhythms of color \\
                 Particle man \\
                 Totality: the impossible coincidence \\
                 That's entertainment \\
                 Cold winds \\
                 Weather outside is frightful \\
                 Tomorrow's sun",
}

@Book{Berners-Lee:2019:TNP,
  author =       "Mike Berners-Lee",
  title =        "There is no {Plan(et) B}: a handbook for the make or
                 break years",
  publisher =    pub-CAMBRIDGE,
  address =      pub-CAMBRIDGE:adr,
  pages =        "xii + 288",
  year =         "2019",
  ISBN =         "1-108-42424-4 (hardcover), 1-108-43958-6 (paperback)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-1-108-42424-0 (hardcover), 978-1-108-43958-9
                 (paperback)",
  LCCN =         "TJ163.2 .B4745 2019",
  bibdate =      "Mon Mar 4 08:12:41 MST 2019",
  bibsource =    "fsz3950.oclc.org:210/WorldCat;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 https://www.cambridge.org/us/academic/subjects/earth-and-environmental-science/environmental-science/there-no-planet-b-handbook-make-or-break-years",
  abstract =     "Almost every year since records began, our species has
                 had more energy at its disposal than it had the year
                 before. For the last 50 years, the growth rate has
                 averaged 2.4\% per year, more than tripling in total
                 over that time. For the century before that it was more
                 like 1\% per year, and as we go back through history,
                 the growth rate looks lower still but nevertheless
                 positive, give or take the odd blip. We have been
                 getting continually more powerful, not just by growing
                 our energy supply, but by using it with ever more
                 efficiency and inventiveness. In doing so, we have been
                 increasingly affecting our world, through a mixture of
                 accident and design. The restorative powers of our
                 planet, meanwhile, have remained broadly the same, so
                 the balance of power has been shifting --- and it has
                 now tipped. Throughout history, the dominant cultures
                 have treated the planet as a big and robust place,
                 compared to everything we could throw at it --- and
                 that approach has not, generally speaking, come back to
                 bite us.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  libnote =      "Not in my library.",
  subject =      "Power resources; Environmental aspects; Energy
                 consumption; Climatic changes; Pollution; Environmental
                 protection; Climatic changes; Energy consumption;
                 Environmental aspects; Environmental protection;
                 Pollution; Power resources",
  tableofcontents = "Acknowledgments \\
                 Notes on units \\
                 1. Introduction \\
                 2. Food \\
                 3. More on climate and environment \\
                 4. Energy \\
                 5. Travel and transport \\
                 6. Growth, money and metrics \\
                 7. People and work \\
                 8. Business and technology \\
                 9. Values, truth and trust \\
                 10. Conclusion: thinking skills for today's world \\
                 11. Big picture summary \\
                 12. What can I do? Summary \\
                 Appendix: climate change basics \\
                 Alphabetical quick tour \\
                 Endnotes \\
                 Index.",
}

@Book{Bernstein:1981:PEH,
  author =       "Jeremy Bernstein",
  title =        "Prophet of energy, {Hans Bethe}",
  publisher =    "Dutton",
  address =      "New York, NY, USA",
  pages =        "xii + 212",
  year =         "1981",
  ISBN =         "0-525-47677-6 (paperback)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-525-47677-1 (paperback)",
  LCCN =         "QC16.B4 B47",
  bibdate =      "Wed Mar 13 06:31:01 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "fsz3950.oclc.org:210/WorldCat;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/bibnet/authors/b/bethe-hans.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  price =        "US\$7.25",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  remark-1 =     "Originally published under title: Hans Bethe, prophet
                 of energy. Based on articles written for the New
                 Yorker.",
  remark-2 =     "From page 107, about the Antiballistic Missile (ABM)
                 system: ``The amount of money that was wasted on this
                 exercise is staggering.''",
  subject =      "Bethe, Hans A; (Hans Albrecht); Physicists; Biography;
                 Nuclear energy; History",
  subject-dates = "1906--2005",
}

@Book{Bernstein:1996:HUC,
  author =       "Jeremy Bernstein",
  title =        "{Hitler}'s uranium club: the secret recordings at
                 {Farm Hall}",
  publisher =    pub-AIP,
  address =      pub-AIP:adr,
  pages =        "xxx + 427 + 4",
  year =         "1996",
  ISBN =         "1-56396-258-6",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-1-56396-258-5",
  LCCN =         "QC773.3.G3 B47 1995",
  bibdate =      "Mon Mar 06 08:37:25 2000",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/bibnet/authors/b/bethe-hans.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/bibnet/authors/b/bohr-niels.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/bibnet/authors/f/fermi-enrico.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/bibnet/authors/h/heisenberg-werner.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/einstein.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  note =         "Introduction by David Cassidy.",
  price =        "US\$34.95",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  remark =       "This book is primarily about the German quantum
                 physicists involved in the atomic bomb project in
                 Germany during World War II, but Einstein's famous
                 letter of 2-Aug-1939 to US President Franklin D.
                 Roosevelt alerting him to their work is reproduced on
                 pp.~13--14. On 1-Sep-1939, Germany invaded Poland. Two
                 days later, France and England declared war on Germany,
                 and the world was in darkness for six years.",
  tableofcontents = "Preface / vii \\
                 Introduction / xiii \\
                 Brief Chronology / xxvii \\
                 Prologue / 1 \\
                 Cast of Characters / 55 \\
                 Part I: Settling In / 57 \\
                 Preamble (1 May--30 June 1945) / 59 \\
                 Report 1 (3--18 July 1945) / 74 \\
                 Report 2 (18--31 July 1945) / 89 \\
                 Report 3 (1--6 August 1945) Ill Part II: The Bomb Drops
                 / 117 \\
                 Report 4 (6--7 August 1945) / 119 \\
                 Appendix to Report 4 / 161 \\
                 Part III: Putting the Pieces Together / 165 \\
                 Report 5 (8--22 August 1945) / 167 \\
                 Appendix to Report 5 / 217 \\
                 Part IV: Looking to the Future / 233 \\
                 Report 6 (23 August--6 September 1945) / 235 \\
                 Report 7 (7--13 September 1945) / 241 \\
                 Report 8 (14--15 September 1945) / 263 \\
                 Part V: Looking Toward Home / 275 \\
                 Report 9 (16--23 September 1945) / 277 \\
                 Appendix to Report 9 / 280 \\
                 Report 10 (24--30 September 1945) / 284 \\
                 Appendix to Report 10 / 288 \\
                 Report 11 (1--7 October 1945) / 294 \\
                 Report 12 (8--14 October 1945) / 301 \\
                 Report 14 (14--21 October 1945) / 302 \\
                 Report 16 (22--28 October 1945) / 304 \\
                 Report 16-A (29 October--4 November 1945) / 306 \\
                 Report 17 (5--11 November 1945) / 311 \\
                 Part VI: A Nobel for Otto Hahn / 317 \\
                 Report 18 (12--18 November 1945) / 319 \\
                 Appendix to Report 18 / 322 \\
                 Report 19 (19--25 November 1945) / 338 \\
                 Report 20 (26 November--2 December 1945) / 344 \\
                 Report 21 (3--9 December 1945) / 347 \\
                 Report 22 (10--16 December 1945) / 349 \\
                 Report 23/24 (17--30 December 1945) / 350 \\
                 Epilogue / 353 \\
                 Appendix 1: Heisenberg's Lecture, 26 February / 1942
                 \\
                 ``The Theoretical Foundations for Obtaining Energy from
                 Fission of Uranium'' Translation by William Sweet / 373
                 \\
                 Appendix 2: Von Laue's Letters to Paul Rosbaud, 1959 /
                 385 \\
                 Appendix 3: BBC Report, 6 August 1945 / 393 \\
                 Appendix 4: Biographical Sketches of the Ten Detainees
                 / 399 \\
                 Selected Bibliography / 403 \\
                 Index / 409",
}

@Book{Bernstein:2007:PHW,
  author =       "Jeremy Bernstein",
  title =        "Plutonium: a history of the world's most dangerous
                 element",
  publisher =    pub-JOSEPH-HENRY,
  address =      pub-JOSEPH-HENRY:adr,
  pages =        "x + 194 + 8",
  year =         "2007",
  ISBN =         "0-309-10296-0 (hardcover), 1-280-84457-4,
                 0-309-10773-3 (e-book)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-309-10296-4 (hardcover), 978-1-280-84457-7,
                 978-0-309-10773-0 (e-book)",
  LCCN =         "QD181.P9 B47 2007",
  bibdate =      "Tue Dec 9 09:09:51 MST 2008",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/bibnet/authors/r/rutherford-ernest.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/einstein.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 z3950.loc.gov:7090/Voyager",
  URL =          "http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip075/2006038466.html",
  abstract =     "When plutonium was first manufactured at Berkeley in
                 the spring of 1941, there was so little of it that it
                 was not visible to the naked eye. It took a year to
                 accumulate enough so that one could actually see it.
                 Now there is so much that we don't know what to do to
                 get rid of it. We have created a monster. The history
                 of plutonium is as strange as the element itself. When
                 scientists began looking for it, they did so simply in
                 the spirit of inquiry, not certain whether there were
                 still spots to fill on the periodic table. But the
                 discovery of fission made it clear that this
                 still-hypothetical element would be more than just a
                 scientific curiosity --- it could be a powerful nuclear
                 weapon. As it turned out, it is good for almost nothing
                 else. Plutonium's nuclear potential put it at the heart
                 of the World War II arms race --- the Russians found
                 out about it through espionage, the Germans through
                 independent research, and everybody wanted some. Now,
                 nearly everyone has some --- the United States alone
                 has about 47 metric tons --- but it has almost no uses
                 besides warmongering. How did the product of scientific
                 curiosity become such a dangerous burden? In his new
                 history of this complex and dangerous element, noted
                 physicist Jeremy Bernstein describes the steps that
                 were taken to transform plutonium from a laboratory
                 novelty into the nuclear weapon that destroyed
                 Nagasaki. This is the first book to weave together the
                 many strands of plutonium's story, explaining not only
                 the science but the people involved.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  subject =      "Plutonium; History",
  tableofcontents = "Preamble \\
                 The history of uranium \\
                 The periodic table \\
                 Frau R{\"o}ntgen's hand \\
                 Close calls \\
                 Fissions \\
                 Transuranics \\
                 Plutonium goes to war \\
                 Los Alamos \\
                 Electrons \\
                 Now what?",
}

@Book{Best:2004:MDL,
  author =       "Joel Best",
  title =        "More damned lies and statistics: how numbers confuse
                 public issues",
  publisher =    pub-U-CALIFORNIA-PRESS,
  address =      pub-U-CALIFORNIA-PRESS:adr,
  pages =        "xvii + 200",
  year =         "2004",
  ISBN =         "0-520-23830-3 (cloth)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-520-23830-5 (cloth)",
  LCCN =         "HM535 .B474 2004",
  bibdate =      "Wed Nov 30 07:12:07 MST 2005",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 z3950.loc.gov:7090/Voyager",
  URL =          "ftp://uiarchive.cso.uiuc.edu/pub/etext/gutenberg/;
                 http://www.loc.gov/catdir/bios/ucal052/2003028076.html;
                 http://www.loc.gov/catdir/description/ucal051/2003028076.html;
                 http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0412/2003028076.html",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  libnote =      "Not in my library.",
  subject =      "Sociology; Statistical methods; Social problems;
                 Statistical methods; Social indicators",
  tableofcontents = "Missing numbers \\
                 Confusing numbers \\
                 Scary numbers \\
                 Authoritative numbers \\
                 Magical numbers \\
                 Contentious numbers \\
                 Toward statistical literacy?",
}

@Book{Beyer:1978:CHM,
  editor =       "William H. Beyer",
  title =        "{CRC} Handbook of Mathematical Sciences",
  publisher =    pub-CRC,
  address =      pub-CRC:adr,
  edition =      "Fifth",
  pages =        "xii + 982",
  year =         "1978",
  ISBN =         "0-8493-0655-8",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-8493-0655-6",
  LCCN =         "QA47.H324 1978",
  bibdate =      "Wed May 10 18:26:58 2000",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  DEWEY =        "510/.21/2",
  idnumber =     "527",
}

@Book{Bhandarkar:1996:AIA,
  author =       "Dileep P. Bhandarkar",
  title =        "{Alpha} Implementations and Architecture: Complete
                 Reference and Guide",
  publisher =    pub-DP,
  address =      pub-DP:adr,
  pages =        "xviii + 328",
  year =         "1996",
  ISBN =         "1-55558-130-7 (paperback)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-1-55558-130-5 (paperback)",
  LCCN =         "QA76.8.A176B47 1996",
  bibdate =      "Thu Aug 07 13:42:54 1997",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  price =        "US\$41.95",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  tableofcontents = "1: Historical Perspective \\
                 2: RISC Design Issues \\
                 3: Alpha Architecture \\
                 4: Comparing RISC Architectures \\
                 5: First Generation Alpha Processor Chips \\
                 6: 21064-based System Implementations \\
                 7: Second Generation Microprocessor and Systems \\
                 8: Performance Characterization \\
                 9: Comparing RISC Implementations \\
                 10: Operating Systems and Compilers \\
                 Appendix A: Alpha Instruction Encodings",
}

@Book{Bickerton:2009:ATH,
  author =       "Derek Bickerton",
  title =        "{Adam}'s tongue: how humans made language, how
                 language made humans",
  publisher =    "Hill and Wang",
  address =      "New York, NY, USA",
  pages =        "286",
  year =         "2009",
  ISBN =         "0-8090-2281-8",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-8090-2281-6",
  LCCN =         "P106 .B4667 2009",
  bibdate =      "Tue Sep 1 16:11:46 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 z3950.loc.gov:7090/Voyager",
  abstract =     "How language evolved has been called ``the hardest
                 problem in science.'' Linguist Derek Bickerton shows
                 how and why previous attempts to solve that problem
                 have fallen short. This book is the first that
                 thoroughly integrates the story of how language evolved
                 with the story of how humans evolved. Taking cues from
                 topics as diverse as the foraging strategies of ants,
                 the distribution of large prehistoric herbivores, and
                 the construction of ecological niches, Bickerton
                 produces a dazzling new alternative to the conventional
                 wisdom. Language is unique to humans, but it isn't the
                 only thing that sets us apart from other species ---
                 our cognitive powers are qualitatively different. So
                 could there be two separate discontinuities between
                 humans and the rest of nature? No, says Bickerton; he
                 shows how the mere possession of symbolic units ---
                 words --- automatically opened a new and different
                 cognitive universe.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  subject =      "Language and languages; Human evolution;
                 Psycholinguistics",
  tableofcontents = "The size of the problem \\
                 Thinking like engineers \\
                 Singing apes? \\
                 Chatting apes? \\
                 Niches aren't everything (they're the only thing) \\
                 Our ancestors in their niches \\
                 Go to the ant, thou sluggard \\
                 The big bang \\
                 The challenge from Chomsky \\
                 Making up our minds \\
                 An acorn grows to a sapling \\
                 The sapling becomes an oak",
}

@Article{Bickley:1948:DAO,
  author =       "W. G. Bickley",
  title =        "Difference and Associated Operators, With Some
                 Applications",
  journal =      j-J-MATH-PHYS-MIT,
  volume =       "27",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "183--192",
  month =        oct,
  year =         "1948",
  bibdate =      "Thu Nov 17 10:12:26 2005",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  keywords =     "Adams--Bashforth integration of ODEs; averaging
                 operator; backward difference operator; backward
                 summation operator; central difference operator;
                 central summation operator; Euler--Maclaurin summation
                 formula; forward difference operator; forward summation
                 operator; Gregory quadrature; integral operator;
                 Milne's rule; numerical differentiation; numerical
                 integration; Simpson's rule; step operator; trapezoidal
                 rule",
  remark =       "This is a recommended source of clear and compact
                 descriptions of the difference and summation operators,
                 and their applications to numerical differentiation and
                 integration, and the derivation of quadrature rules.",
}

@Book{Biddle:2009:DSM,
  author =       "Wayne Biddle",
  title =        "Dark side of the moon: {Wernher von Braun}, the {Third
                 Reich}, and the space race",
  publisher =    pub-NORTON,
  address =      pub-NORTON:adr,
  pages =        "xiv + 220 + 8",
  year =         "2009",
  ISBN =         "0-393-05910-3 (hardcover)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-393-05910-6 (hardcover)",
  LCCN =         "TL781.85.V6 B53 2009",
  bibdate =      "Fri Aug 8 06:43:57 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 z3950.loc.gov:7090/Voyager",
  abstract =     "A stunning investigation of the roots of the first
                 moon landing forty years ago, this illuminating story
                 of the dawn of the space age reaches back to the
                 reactionary modernism of the Third Reich, using the
                 life of ``rocket scientist'' Wernher von Braun as its
                 narrative path through the crumbling of Weimar Germany
                 and the rise of the Nazi regime. Von Braun, a blinkered
                 opportunist who could apply only tunnel vision to his
                 meteoric career, stands as an archetype of myriad
                 twentieth century technologists who thrived under
                 regimes of military secrecy and unlimited money. His
                 seamless transformation from developer of the deadly V2
                 ballistic missile for Hitler to an American celebrity
                 as the supposed genius behind the golden years of the
                 U.S. space program in the 1950s and 1960s raises
                 haunting questions about the culture of the Cold War,
                 the shared values of technology in totalitarian and
                 democratic societies, and the imperatives of material
                 progress.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  language =     "German",
  subject =      "Von Braun, Wernher; Rocketry; Germany; Biography;
                 United States; World War, 1939-1945; Science; Space
                 race; History; 20th century; Astronautics; Moral and
                 ethical aspects; Cold War; Politics and government;
                 1933-1945",
  subject-dates = "1912--1977",
  tableofcontents = "1. A Junker's life \\
                 2. Memories of defeat \\
                 3. ``Highly technological romanticism'' \\
                 4. An heir of credibility \\
                 5. Childhood's end \\
                 6. ``Fingers in the pie'' \\
                 7. Supreme zeal \\
                 8. Grand and horribly wrong \\
                 9. Depravity \\
                 10. ``A psychologicsal block'' \\
                 Epilog \\
                 Notes \\
                 Selected bibliography \\
                 Photograph credits \\
                 Index",
}

@Book{Bienz:1993:PDF,
  author =       "Tim Bienz and Richard Cohn",
  title =        "Portable Document Format Reference Manual",
  publisher =    pub-AW,
  address =      pub-AW:adr,
  pages =        "xii + 214",
  year =         "1993",
  ISBN =         "0-201-62628-4",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-201-62628-5",
  LCCN =         "QA76.9.F5P67 1993",
  bibdate =      "Wed Feb 23 14:42:18 1994",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/postscri.bib",
  price =        "US\$24.95",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  tableofcontents = "1: Introduction \\
                 Section: I. Portable Document Format \\
                 2: Overview \\
                 3: Coordinate Systems \\
                 4: Objects \\
                 5: File Structure \\
                 6: Document Structure \\
                 7; Page Descriptions \\
                 Section II: Optimizing PDF Files \\
                 8: General Techniques for Optimizing PDF Files \\
                 9: Optimizing Text \\
                 10: Optimizing Graphics \\
                 11: Optimizing Images",
}

@Article{Bigelow:digital-typography,
  author =       "Charles Bigelow and Donald Day",
  title =        "Digital Typography",
  journal =      j-SA,
  volume =       "249",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "106--119",
  month =        aug,
  year =         "1983",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@TechReport{Billawala:metamarks,
  author =       "Neenie Billawala",
  title =        "Metamarks: Preliminary studies for a {Pandora's Box}
                 of Shapes",
  number =       "{STAN-CS-89-1256}",
  institution =  pub-STAN-CS,
  address =      pub-STAN-CS:adr,
  month =        may,
  year =         "1989",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Manual{BIOSIS:1994:SSB,
  title =        "Serial Sources for the {BIOSIS Previews} Database",
  organization = "BIOSIS",
  address =      "210 Arch Street, Philadelphia, PA 19103-1399, USA",
  pages =        "vii + 450",
  month =        dec,
  year =         "1994",
  CODEN =        "SSBDE4",
  ISSN =         "1044-4297",
  LCCN =         "Z5321 .B68a",
  bibdate =      "Wed Apr 24 17:25:50 1996",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  note =         "Contains journal full names and abbreviations used in
                 the BIOSIS and Biological Abstracts databases, plus
                 ISSN and CODEN values, for 6,395 active and 10,935
                 inactive serials in 41 languages from 94 countries.
                 Also available on CD ROM.",
  price =        "US\$65.00",
  URL =          "http://www.biosis.org/htmls/press/960126.html",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  libnote =      "Not in my library.",
}

@Book{Bird:2005:APT,
  author =       "Kai Bird and Martin J. Sherwin",
  title =        "{American Prometheus}: the triumph and tragedy of {J.
                 Robert Oppenheimer}",
  publisher =    pub-KNOPF,
  address =      pub-KNOPF:adr,
  pages =        "xiii + 721 + 32",
  year =         "2005",
  ISBN =         "0-375-72626-8, 0-375-41202-6",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-375-72626-2, 978-0-375-41202-8",
  LCCN =         "QC16.O62 B57 2005",
  bibdate =      "Mon Dec 12 15:27:36 MST 2005",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/bibnet/authors/o/oppenheimer-j-robert.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/einstein.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/physperspect.bib;
                 melvyl.cdlib.org:210/CDL90",
  URL =          "ftp://uiarchive.cso.uiuc.edu/pub/etext/gutenberg/;
                 http://site.ebrary.com/lib/ucsc/Doc?id=10078784",
  abstract-1 =   "[This is the] biography of J. Robert Oppenheimer,
                 ``father of the atomic bomb,'' the brilliant,
                 charismatic physicist who led the effort to capture the
                 awesome fire of the sun for his country in time of war.
                 Immediately after Hiroshima, he became the most famous
                 scientist of his generation - one of the iconic figures
                 of the twentieth century, the embodiment of modern man
                 confronting the consequences of scientific progress. He
                 was the author of a radical proposal to place
                 international controls over atomic materials - an idea
                 that is still relevant today. He opposed the
                 development of the hydrogen bomb and criticized the Air
                 Force's plans to fight an infinitely dangerous nuclear
                 war. In the now almost-forgotten hysteria of the early
                 1950s, his ideas were anathema to powerful advocates of
                 a massive nuclear buildup, and, in response, Atomic
                 Energy Commission chairman Lewis Strauss, Superbomb
                 advocate Edward Teller and FBI director J. Edgar Hoover
                 worked behind the scenes to have a hearing board find
                 that Oppenheimer could not be trusted with America's
                 nuclear secrets.",
  abstract-2 =   "The first full-scale biography of the ``father of the
                 atomic bomb,'' the brilliant, charismatic physicist who
                 led the effort to capture the fire of the sun for his
                 country in time of war. After Hiroshima, he became the
                 most famous scientist of his generation--an icon of
                 modern man confronting the consequences of scientific
                 progress. He created a radical proposal to place
                 international controls over atomic materials, opposed
                 the development of the hydrogen bomb and criticized the
                 Air Force's plans to fight a nuclear war. In the
                 hysteria of the early 1950s, his ideas were anathema to
                 powerful advocates of a massive nuclear buildup, and
                 people such as Edward Teller and FBI director J. Edgar
                 Hoover worked behind the scenes to obtain a finding
                 that he could not be trusted with America's nuclear
                 secrets. This book is both biography and history,
                 significant to our understanding of our recent
                 past--and of our choices for the future.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  remark =       "This book received a Pulitzer Prize.",
  subject =      "Oppenheimer, J. Robert; Physicists; United States;
                 Biography; Atomic bomb; United States; History;
                 Science; Political aspects; United States; History;
                 20th century; United States; History; 20th century",
  subject-dates = "1904--1967",
  tableofcontents = "I. ``He received every new idea as perfectly
                 beautiful'' \\
                 ``His separate prison'' \\
                 ``I am having a pretty bad time'' \\
                 ``I find the work hard, thank God, and almost
                 pleasant'' \\
                 ``I am Oppenheimer'' \\
                 ``Oppie'' \\
                 ``The Nim Nim boys'' \\
                 II. ``In 1936 my interests began to change'' \\
                 ``[Frank] clipped it out and sent it in'' \\
                 ``More and more surely'' \\
                 ``I'm going to marry a friend of yours, Steve'' \\
                 ``We were pulling the New Deal to the left'' \\
                 ``The coordinator of rapid rupture'' \\
                 ``The Chevalier affair'' \\
                 III. ``He'd become very patriotic'' \\
                 ``Too much secrecy'' \\
                 ``Oppenheimer is telling the truth \ldots{}'' \\
                 ``Suicide, motive unknown'' \\
                 ``Would you like to adopt her?'' \\
                 ``Bohr was God, and Oppie was his prophet'' \\
                 ``The impact of the gadget on civilization'' \\
                 ``Now we're all sons-of-bitches'' \\
                 IV. ``Those poor little people'' \\
                 ``I feel I have blood on my hands'' \\
                 ``People could destroy New York'' \\
                 ``Oppie had a rash and is now immune'' \\
                 ``An intellectual hotel'' \\
                 ``He couldn't understand why he did it'' \\
                 ``I am sure that is why she threw things at him'' \\
                 ``He never let on what his opinion was'' \\
                 ``Dark words about Oppie'' \\
                 ``Scientist X'' \\
                 ``The beast in the jungle'' \\
                 V. ``It looks pretty bad, doesn't it?'' \\
                 ``I fear that this whole thing is a piece of idiocy''
                 \\
                 ``A manifestation of hysteria'' \\
                 ``A black mark on the escutcheon of our country'' \\
                 ``I can still feel the warm blood on my hands'' \\
                 ``It was really like a never-never land'' \\
                 ``It should have been done the day after trinity'' \\
                 ``There's only one Robert.''",
}

@Book{Bishop:2003:CSA,
  author =       "Matt Bishop",
  title =        "Computer Security: Art and Science",
  publisher =    pub-AW,
  address =      pub-AW:adr,
  pages =        "xli + 1084",
  year =         "2003",
  ISBN =         "0-201-44099-7 (hardcover)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-201-44099-7 (hardcover)",
  LCCN =         "QA76.9.A25 B56 2002",
  bibdate =      "Wed Dec 31 13:50:12 2003",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/cryptography2000.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  price =        "US\$79.99, CAN\$120.99",
  abstract =     "This book has three goals. The first is to show the
                 importance of theory to practice and of practice to
                 theory. The second goal is to emphasize that computer
                 security and cryptography are different. Although
                 cryptography is an essential component of computer
                 security, it is by no means the only component. The
                 third goal is to demonstrate that computer security is
                 not just a science but also an art. It is an art
                 because no system can be considered secure without an
                 examination of how it is to be used. Computer security
                 is also a science. Its theory is based on mathematical
                 constructions, analyses, and proofs. Its systems are
                 built in accordance with the accepted practices of
                 engineering. The material in this book is at the
                 advanced undergraduate level. Throughout, [the authors]
                 assume that the reader is familiar with the basics of
                 compilers and computer architecture (such as the use of
                 the program stack) and operating systems. The reader
                 should also be comfortable with modular arithmetic (for
                 the material on cryptography).",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  tableofcontents = "Part 1: Introduction \\
                 1: An overview of computer security \\
                 Part 2: Foundations \\
                 2: Access control matrix \\
                 3: Foundational results \\
                 Part 3: Policy \\
                 4: Security policies \\
                 5: Confidentiality policies \\
                 6: Integrity policies \\
                 7: Hybrid policies \\
                 8: Noninterference and policy composition \\
                 Part 4: Implementation I: cryptography \\
                 9: Basic cryptography \\
                 10: Key management \\
                 11: Cipher techniques \\
                 12: Authentication \\
                 Part 5: Implementation II: systems \\
                 13: Design principles \\
                 14: Representing identity \\
                 15: Access control mechanisms \\
                 16: Information flow \\
                 17: Confinement problem \\
                 Part 6: Assurance / by Elisabeth Sullivan \\
                 18: Introduction to assurance \\
                 19: Building systems with assurance \\
                 20: Formal methods \\
                 21: Evaluating systems \\
                 Part 7: Special topics \\
                 22: Malicious logic \\
                 23: Vulnerability analysis \\
                 24: Auditing \\
                 25: Intrusion detection \\
                 Part 8: Practicum \\
                 26: Network security \\
                 27: System security \\
                 28: User security \\
                 29: Program security \\
                 Part 9: End matter \\
                 30: Lattices \\
                 31: The extended Euclidean algorithm \\
                 32: Entropy and uncertainty \\
                 33: Virtual machines \\
                 34: Symbolic logic \\
                 35: Example academic security policy",
}

@Article{Bjorstad:SR-4-11-57,
  author =       "Petter E. Bjorstad and Erik Boman",
  title =        "{SLALOM}: a Better Algorithm",
  journal =      j-SR,
  volume =       "4",
  number =       "11",
  pages =        "57--62",
  month =        nov,
  year =         "1991",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Blaauw:1997:CAC,
  author =       "Gerrit A. Blaauw and Frederick P. {Brooks, Jr.}",
  title =        "Computer Architecture: Concepts and Evolution",
  publisher =    pub-AW,
  address =      pub-AW:adr,
  pages =        "xlviii + 1213",
  year =         "1997",
  ISBN =         "0-201-10557-8",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-201-10557-5",
  LCCN =         "QA76.9.A73 B57 1997",
  bibdate =      "Wed Jul 09 17:22:33 1997",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  price =        "US\$59.95",
  abstract =     "Blaauw and Brooks first develop a conceptual framework
                 for understanding computer architecture. They then
                 describe not only what present architectural practice
                 is, but how it came to be so. A major theme is the
                 early divergence and the later reconvergence of
                 computer architectures. They examine both innovations
                 that survived and became part of the standard computer,
                 and the many ideas that were explored in real machines
                 but did not survive. In describing the discards, they
                 also address why these ideas did not make it. The
                 authors' goals are to analyze and systematize familiar
                 design alternatives, and to introduce you to unfamiliar
                 ones. They illuminate their discussion with detailed
                 executable descriptions of both early and more recent
                 computers. The designer's most important study, they
                 argue, is other people's designs. This book's computer
                 zoo will give you a unique resource for precise
                 information about 30 important machines. Armed with the
                 factors pro and con on the various known solutions to
                 design problems, you will be better able to determine
                 the most fruitful architectural course for your own
                 design.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  tableofcontents = "Part 1. Design decisions, chapters 1--8 \\
                 Part 2. A computer zoo, chapters 9--16",
}

@Book{Black:2002:IHS,
  author =       "Edwin Black",
  title =        "{IBM} and the {Holocaust}: the strategic alliance
                 between {Nazi Germany} and {America}'s most powerful
                 corporation",
  publisher =    "Three Rivers Press",
  address =      "New York, NY, USA",
  pages =        "551",
  year =         "2002",
  ISBN =         "0-609-80899-0 (paperback)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-609-80899-3 (paperback)",
  LCCN =         "HD9696.2.U64 I253 2002",
  bibdate =      "Fri Jan 13 17:24:54 MST 2006",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 melvyl.cdlib.org:210/CDL90",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  remark =       "Originally published: New York: Crown Publishers,
                 c2001. With a new afterword.",
  subject =      "Germany; Statistical services; History; 20th century;
                 Holocaust, Jewish (1939--1945); Data processing; Jews;
                 1933--1945",
  tableofcontents = "Numbered people\par

                 The IBM-Hitler intersection\par

                 Identifying the Jews\par

                 The IBM-Nazi alliance\par

                 A Nazi medal for Watson\par

                 War cards\par

                 Deadly count\par

                 With blitzkrieg efficiency\par

                 The Dehomag revolt\par

                 The struggle to stay in the Axis\par

                 France and Holland\par

                 IBM and the war\par

                 Extermination\par

                 The spoils of genocide\par

                 Afterword: the next chapter\par

                 Revelation and responsibility",
}

@Book{Blair:1998:SIU,
  author =       "John D. Blair and {The Samba Team}",
  title =        "{Samba}: Integrating {UNIX} and {Windows}",
  publisher =    pub-SSC,
  address =      pub-SSC:adr,
  pages =        "xviii + 298",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "1998",
  ISBN =         "1-57831-006-7",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-1-57831-006-7",
  LCCN =         "QA76.76.O63 B55 1998",
  bibdate =      "Wed Jun 17 06:25:11 1998",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  note =         "From the publisher: ``Includes CD-ROM containing
                 version 1.9.18 of the Samba server, a library of useful
                 tools and scripts, the Samba mailing list archives, and
                 all examples discussed in the book.''",
  price =        "US\$29.95",
  URL =          "http://www.clbooks.com/sqlnut/SP/search/gtsumt?source=&isbn=1578310067;
                 http://www.ssc.com/ssc/samba/",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Blatner:1993:RWS,
  author =       "David Blatner and Steve Roth",
  title =        "Real World Scanning and Halftones",
  publisher =    pub-PEACHPIT,
  address =      pub-PEACHPIT:adr,
  pages =        "xx + 275",
  year =         "1993",
  ISBN =         "1-56609-093-8",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-1-56609-093-3",
  LCCN =         "T384 .B52 1993",
  bibdate =      "Tue Aug 22 14:46:09 1995",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  price =        "US\$24.95",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Blatner:1997:JP,
  author =       "David Blatner",
  title =        "The Joy of $ \pi $",
  publisher =    "Walker and Co.",
  address =      "New York, NY, USA",
  pages =        "xiii + 129",
  year =         "1997",
  ISBN =         "0-8027-1332-7 (hardcover), 0-8027-7562-4 (paperback)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-8027-1332-2 (hardcover), 978-0-8027-7562-7
                 (paperback)",
  LCCN =         "QA484 .B55 1997",
  bibdate =      "Fri Jun 17 06:26:55 MDT 2005",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/pi.bib;
                 z3950.loc.gov:7090/Voyager",
  URL =          "http://www.walkerbooks.com/books/catalog.php?key=4",
  abstract =     "No number has captured the attention and imagination
                 of people throughout the ages as much as the ratio of a
                 circle's circumference to its diameter. Pi or $ \pi $
                 as it is symbolically known, is infinite and, in this
                 book it proves to be infinitely intriguing. The author
                 explores the many facets of pi and humankind's
                 fascination with it, from the ancient Egyptians and
                 Archimedes to Leonardo da Vinci and the modern-day
                 Chudnovsky brothers, who have calculated pi to eight
                 billion digits with a homemade supercomputer. He
                 recounts the history of pi and the quirky stories of
                 those obsessed with it. Sidebars document fascinating
                 pi trivia (including a segment from the O. J. Simpson
                 trial). Dozens of snippets and factoids reveal pi's
                 remarkable impact over the centuries. Mnemonic devices
                 teach how to memorize pi to many hundreds of digits (or
                 more, if you're so inclined). Pi inspired cartoons,
                 poems, limericks, and jokes offer delightfully
                 ``square'' pi humor. And, to satisfy even the most
                 exacting of number jocks, the first one million digits
                 of pi appear throughout the book.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  libnote =      "Not in my library.",
  subject =      "Pi (mathematical constant)",
  tableofcontents = "1: Introduction: Why pi \\
                 2: History of pi \\
                 3: Chudnovsky brothers \\
                 4: Symbol \\
                 5: Personality of pi \\
                 6: Circle squarers \\
                 7: Memorizing pi",
}

@Book{Bloch:2001:EJP,
  author =       "Joshua Bloch",
  title =        "Effective {Java}: Programming Language Guide",
  publisher =    pub-AW,
  address =      pub-AW:adr,
  pages =        "xvi + 252",
  year =         "2001",
  ISBN =         "0-201-31005-8, 3-642-56735-5 (e-book)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-201-31005-4, 978-3-642-56735-3 (e-book)",
  LCCN =         "QA76.73.J38 B57 2001",
  bibdate =      "Sat Apr 20 11:10:41 2002",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/java2000.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  abstract =     "\booktitle{Effective Java} is an explicit (and
                 acknowledged) homage to Scott Meyer's
                 \booktitle{Effective C++}. Josh Bloch shares the
                 programming practices of the most expert Java
                 programmers with the rest of the programming community.
                 Distilling the habits of experienced programmers into
                 50 short stand-alone essays, Bloch has laid out the
                 most essential and effective Java rules, providing
                 comprehensive descriptions of techniques. The essays
                 address practical problems that all Java programmers
                 encounter, presents specific ways to improve programs
                 and designs, and also shows how to avoid traps in Java
                 programming. An enormously useful book, each essay
                 contains top notch code examples and insightful ``war
                 stories'' that help capture the students' attention.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  tableofcontents = "1: Introduction \\
                 2: Creating and destroying objects \\
                 3: Methods common to all objects \\
                 4: Classes and interfaces \\
                 5: Substitutes for C constructs \\
                 6: Methods \\
                 7: General programming \\
                 8: Exceptions \\
                 9: Threads \\
                 10: Serialization \\
                 References \\
                 Index of Patterns and Idioms",
}

@Book{Bloomfield:2008:HEW,
  author =       "Louis Bloomfield",
  title =        "How everything works: making physics out of the
                 ordinary",
  publisher =    pub-WILEY,
  address =      pub-WILEY:adr,
  pages =        "xv + 720",
  year =         "2008",
  ISBN =         "0-471-74817-X (hardcover)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-471-74817-5 (hardcover)",
  LCCN =         "QC24.5 .B56 2007",
  bibdate =      "Tue Feb 12 15:26:36 MST 2008",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 z3950.gbv.de:20011/gvk",
  URL =          "http://www.loc.gov/catdir/enhancements/fy0649/2006296744-d.html;
                 http://www.loc.gov/catdir/enhancements/fy0708/2006296744-b.html;
                 http://www.loc.gov/catdir/enhancements/fy0728/2006296744-t.html",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  tableofcontents = "Chapter 1. Things That Move \\
                 Chapter 2. More Things That Move \\
                 Chapter 3. Mechanical Things \\
                 Chapter 4. More Mechanical Things \\
                 Chapter 5. Things Involving Fluids \\
                 Chapter 6. Things that Move with Fluids \\
                 Chapter 7. Thermal Things \\
                 Chapter 8. Things that Work with Heat \\
                 Chapter 9. Things with Resonances and Mechanical Waves
                 \\
                 Chapter 10. Electric Things \\
                 Chapter 11. Magnetic and Electromagnetic Things \\
                 Chapter 12. Electronic Things \\
                 Chapter 13. Things that Use Electromagnetic Waves \\
                 Chapter 14. Things that Involve Light \\
                 Chapter 15. Optical Things \\
                 Chapter 16. Things that Use Recent Physics \\
                 Chapter 17. Things that Involve Materials \\
                 Chapter 18. Things that Involve Chemical Physics \\
                 Appendix A. Relevant Mathematics \\
                 Appendix B. Units, Conversion of Units \\
                 Glossary \\
                 Photo Credits \\
                 Index",
}

@Book{Blunden:2002:VMD,
  author =       "Bill Blunden",
  title =        "Virtual Machine Design and Implementation in {C/C++}",
  publisher =    "Wordware Publishing",
  address =      "Plano, TX, USA",
  pages =        "xvii + 668",
  year =         "2002",
  ISBN =         "1-55622-903-8 (paperback), 0-585-40313-9 (e-book)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-1-55622-903-9 (paperback), 978-0-585-40313-7
                 (e-book)",
  LCCN =         "QA76.9.V5 B59 2002",
  bibdate =      "Thu Jul 14 12:01:14 MDT 2005",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 z3950.loc.gov:7090/Voyager",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  libnote =      "Not in my library.",
  subject =      "Virtual computer systems; C++ (Computer program
                 language)",
}

@Book{Boas:2006:MMP,
  author =       "Mary L. Boas",
  title =        "Mathematical Methods in the Physical Sciences",
  publisher =    pub-WILEY,
  address =      pub-WILEY:adr,
  edition =      "Third",
  pages =        "xviii + 839",
  year =         "2006",
  ISBN =         "0-471-19826-9, 0-471-36580-7",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-471-19826-0, 978-0-471-36580-8",
  LCCN =         "QA37.3 .B63 2006",
  bibdate =      "Thu May 3 07:58:44 MDT 2012",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 z3950.loc.gov:7090/Voyager",
  URL =          "http://www.loc.gov/catdir/enhancements/fy0626/2005279918-b.html;
                 http://www.loc.gov/catdir/enhancements/fy0626/2005279918-d.html;
                 http://www.loc.gov/catdir/enhancements/fy0626/2005279918-t.html",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  subject =      "Mathematics; Textbooks",
  tableofcontents = "1. Infinite series, power series \\
                 2. Complex numbers \\
                 3. Linear algebra \\
                 4. Partial differentiation \\
                 5. Multiple integrals \\
                 6. Vector analysis \\
                 7. Fourier series and transforms \\
                 8. Ordinary differential equations \\
                 9. Calculus of variations \\
                 10. Tensor analysis \\
                 11. Special functions \\
                 12. Series solutions of differential equations;
                 Legendre, Bessel, Hermite, and Laguerre functions \\
                 13. Partial differential equations \\
                 14. Functions of a complex variable \\
                 15. Probability and statistics",
}

@Book{Bodanis:2000:BWM,
  author =       "David Bodanis",
  title =        "{$ E = m c^2 $}: a biography of the world's most
                 famous equation",
  publisher =    pub-WALKER,
  address =      pub-WALKER:adr,
  pages =        "ix + 337",
  year =         "2000",
  ISBN =         "0-8027-1352-1 (hardcover)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-8027-1352-0 (hardcover)",
  LCCN =         "QC73.8.C6 B63 2000",
  bibdate =      "Tue Oct 11 06:29:04 MDT 2005",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/einstein.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 z3950.loc.gov:7090/Voyager",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  remark =       "Basis of Nova series ``Einstein's Big Idea'',
                 broadcast October, 2005.",
  subject =      "Force and energy; Mass (Physics); Mathematical
                 physics; Einstein, Albert",
  subject-dates = "1879--1955",
  tableofcontents = "Part 1 --- Birth \\
                 Bern patent office, 1905 \\
                 Part 2 --- Ancestors of $ E = m c^2 $ \\
                 E is for energy \\
                 = \\
                 m is for mass \\
                 c is for celeritas \\
                 2 \\
                 Part 3 --- The early years \\
                 Einstein and the equation \\
                 Into the atom \\
                 Quiet in the midday snow \\
                 Part 4 --- Adulthood \\
                 Germany's turn \\
                 Norway \\
                 America's turn \\
                 8:16 a.m. --- over Japan \\
                 Part 5 --- Till the end of time \\
                 The fires of the sun \\
                 Creating the earth \\
                 A Brahmin lifts his eyes unto the sky \\
                 Epilogue: What else Einstein did \\
                 Appendix: Follow-up of other key participants",
}

@Article{Boehm:1966:FDT,
  author =       "C. Boehm and G. Jacopini",
  title =        "Flow Diagrams, {Turing} Machines, and Languages With
                 Only Two Formation Rules",
  journal =      j-CACM,
  volume =       "9",
  number =       "5",
  pages =        "366--371",
  month =        may,
  year =         "1966",
  CODEN =        "CACMA2",
  ISSN =         "0001-0782 (print), 1557-7317 (electronic)",
  bibdate =      "Tue May 28 07:29:13 1996",
  bibsource =    "ftp://ftp.ira.uka.de/pub/bibliography/Misc/beebe.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  abstract =     "In the first part of the paper, flow diagrams are
                 introduced to represent internal mappings of a set into
                 itself. Although not every diagram is decomposable into
                 a finite number of given base diagrams, this becomes
                 true at a semantical level due to a suitable extension
                 of the given set and of the basic mappings defined in
                 it. Two normalization methods of flow diagrams are
                 given. The first has three base diagrams; the second,
                 only two. In the second part of the paper, the second
                 method is applied to the theory of Turing machines.
                 With every Turing machine provided with a two-way
                 half-tape, there is associated a similar machine, doing
                 essentially the same job, but working on a tape
                 obtained from the first one by interspersing alternate
                 blank squares. The new machine belongs to the family,
                 elsewhere introduced, generated by composition and
                 iteration from the two machines $L$ and $R$. That
                 family is a proper subfamily of the whole family of
                 Turing machines.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Bohren:1987:CGB,
  author =       "Craig F. Bohren",
  title =        "Clouds in a Glass of Beer --- Simple Experiments in
                 Atmospheric Physics",
  publisher =    pub-WILEY,
  address =      pub-WILEY:adr,
  pages =        "xv + 195",
  year =         "1987",
  ISBN =         "0-471-62482-9",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-471-62482-0",
  LCCN =         "QC861.2.B64 1987",
  bibdate =      "Fri Apr 1 18:21:29 1994",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  tableofcontents = "Clouds in a Glass of Beer / 1 \\
                 Genies in Jars, Clouds in Bottles, and a Bucket with a
                 Hole in It / 8 \\
                 Happy Ducks, Like Happy People, Perform Best with Cool
                 Heads / 15 \\
                 Sugar and Spice: The Dirty Wet-Bulb Temperature / 20
                 \\
                 Mixing Clouds / 29 \\
                 Conceptions and Misconceptions of Pressure / 38 \\
                 Dew Drops on a Bathroom Mirror / 44 \\
                 A Murder in Ceylon / 53 \\
                 The Freezing of Lakes / 61 \\
                 The Greenhouse Effect / 67 \\
                 Black Clouds / 86 \\
                 Once in a Blue Moon / 91 \\
                 The Green Flash / 98 \\
                 Multiple Scattering at the Breakfast Table / 104 \\
                 Multiple Scattering at the Beach / 113 \\
                 On a Clear Day You Can't See Forever / 120 \\
                 A Serendipitous Iridescent Cloud / 128 \\
                 Physics on a Manure Heap: More about Black Clouds / 136
                 \\
                 Polarization of Skylight / 144 \\
                 Colors of the Sea / 155 \\
                 Indoor Rainbows / 171 \\
                 Why Rainbows Are Not Impossible in Winter / 180 \\
                 Selected Bibliography and Suggestions for Further
                 Reading / 187 \\
                 Index / 191",
}

@Book{Boole:1854:ILT,
  author =       "George Boole",
  title =        "An Investigation of the Laws of Thought",
  publisher =    pub-DOVER,
  address =      pub-DOVER:adr,
  pages =        "424",
  year =         "1854",
  LCCN =         "BC135 .B7 1951",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  xxISBN =       "none",
}

@Book{Boorstin:1958:ACE,
  author =       "Daniel J. Boorstin",
  title =        "The {Americans}: The Colonial Experience",
  publisher =    pub-VINTAGE,
  address =      pub-VINTAGE:adr,
  pages =        "434",
  year =         "1958",
  ISBN =         "0-394-70513-0",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-394-70513-2",
  LCCN =         "E162.B68 1964",
  bibdate =      "Tue Dec 26 08:12:38 1995",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  price =        "US\$12.00",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  author-dates = "1914--2004",
  remark =       "The first volume of the author's trilogy; the second
                 of which is \booktitle{The Americans, the National
                 Experience}; and the third of which is \booktitle{The
                 Americans, the democratic experience}.",
  tableofcontents = "An Unknown Coast / vii \\
                 Book One: The Vision and the Reality / 2 \\
                 Part One: A City Upon a Hill: The Puritans of
                 Massachusetts Bay / 3 \\
                 1. How Orthodoxy Made the Puritans Practical / 5 \\
                 2. The Sermon as an American Institution / 10 \\
                 3. Search for a New England Way / 15 \\
                 4. Puritan Conservatism / 20 \\
                 5. How Puritans Resisted the Temptation of Utopia / 29
                 \\
                 Part Two: The Inward Plantation: The Quakers of
                 Pennsylvania / 33 \\
                 6. The Quest for Martyrdom / 35 \\
                 7. Trials of Governing: The Oath / 40 \\
                 8. Trials of Governing: Pacifism / 48 \\
                 9. How Quakers Misjudged the Indians / 54 \\
                 10. The Withdrawal / 58 \\
                 11. The Curse of Perfectionism / 63 \\
                 Part Three: Victims of Philanthropy: The Settlers of
                 Georgia / 71 \\
                 12. The Altruism of an Unheroic Age / 73 \\
                 13. London Blueprint for Georgia Utopia / 80 \\
                 14. A Charity Colony / 84 \\
                 15. Death of a Welfare Project / 88 \\
                 16. The Perils of Altruism / 95 \\
                 Part Four: Transplanters: The Virginians / 97 \\
                 17. English Gentlemen, American Style / 99 \\
                 18. From Country Squire to Planter Capitalist / 105 \\
                 19. Government by Gentry / 110 \\
                 20. A Republic of Neighbors / 116 \\
                 21. ``Practical Godliness'': An Episcopal Church
                 Without Bishops / 123 \\
                 22. ``Practical Godliness'': Toleration Without a
                 Theory / 132 \\
                 23. Citizens of Virginia / 139 \\
                 Book Two: Viewpoints and Institutions / 145 \\
                 Part Five: An American Frame of Mind / 147 \\
                 24. Wanted: A Philosophy of the Unexpected / 149 \\
                 25. The Appeal to Self-Evidence / 152 \\
                 26. Knowledge Comes Naturally / 159 \\
                 27. The Natural-History Emphasis / 164 \\
                 Part Six: Educating the Community / 169 \\
                 28. The Community Enters the University / 171 \\
                 29. Higher Education in Place of Higher Learning / 178
                 \\
                 30. The Ideal of the Undifferentiated Man / 185 \\
                 Part Seven: The Learned Lose Their Monopolies / 189 \\
                 31. The Fluidity of Professions / 191 \\
                 32. The Unspecialized Lawyer / 195 \\
                 33. The Fusion of Law and Politics / 202 \\
                 Part Eight: New World Medicine / 207 \\
                 34. Nature-Healing and Simple Remedies / 209 \\
                 35. Focus on the Community / 219 \\
                 36. The General Practitioner / 227 \\
                 37. Learning from Experience / 233 \\
                 Part Nine: The Limits of American Science / 241 \\
                 38. Popular Science: Astronomy for Everybody / 243
                 \\
                 39. Na{\"\i}ve Insights and Ingenious Devices:
                 Electricity / 251 \\
                 40. Backwoods Farming / 259 \\
                 Book Three: Language and the Printed Word / 267 \\
                 Part Ten: The New Uniformity / 269 \\
                 41. An American Accent / 271 \\
                 42. Quest for a Standard / 277 \\
                 43. Culture by the Book: The Spelling Fetish / 284 \\
                 Part Eleven: Culture Without a Capital / 291 \\
                 44. ``Rays Diverging from a Focus'' / 293 \\
                 45. Boston's ``Devout and Useful Books'' / 296 \\
                 46. Manuals for Plantation Living / 301 \\
                 47. The Way of the Marketplace: Philadelphia / 306 \\
                 48. Poetry Without Poets / 313 \\
                 Part Twelve: A Conservative Press / 317 \\
                 49. The Decline of the Book / 319 \\
                 50. The Rise of the Newspaper / 324 \\
                 51. Why Colonial Printed Matter Was Conservative / 329
                 \\
                 52. ``The Publick Printer'' / 335 \\
                 Book Four: Warfare and Diplomacy / 341 \\
                 Part Thirteen: A Nation of Minute Men / 343 \\
                 53. Defensive War and Na{\"\i}ve Diplomacy / 345 \\
                 54. Colonial Militia and the Myth of Preparedness / 352
                 \\
                 55. Home Rule and Colonial ``Isolationism'' / 357 \\
                 56. The Unprofessional Soldier / 363 \\
                 Acknowledgments / 373 \\
                 Bibliographical Notes / 375 \\
                 Index / 423",
}

@Book{Boorstin:1983:D,
  author =       "Daniel J. Boorstin",
  title =        "The Discoverers",
  publisher =    pub-VINTAGE,
  address =      pub-VINTAGE:adr,
  pages =        "xvi + 745",
  year =         "1983",
  ISBN =         "0-394-72625-1",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-394-72625-0",
  LCCN =         "CB69 .B66 1985",
  bibdate =      "Tue Dec 14 22:41:00 1993",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  abstract =     "Tells the ongoing story of the progressive discovery
                 by man of the nature of the observable world and
                 universe.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  shorttableofcontents = "Book one: Time \\
                 The heavenly empire \\
                 From sun time to clock time \\
                 The missionary clock Book two: The earth and the seas
                 \\
                 The geography of the imagination \\
                 Paths to the East \\
                 Doubling the world \\
                 The American surprise \\
                 Sea paths to everywhere \\
                 Book three: Nature \\
                 Seeing the invisible \\
                 Inside ourselves \\
                 Science goes public \\
                 Cataloguing the whole creation \\
                 Book four: Society \\
                 Widening the communities of knowledge \\
                 Opening the past \\
                 Surveying the present",
  subject =      "Civilization; Discoveries in geography; Science;
                 History; Civilisation; Histoire; D{\'e}couvertes
                 g{\'e}ographiques; Sciences; Civilization; Discoveries
                 in geography; Science; Geestesgeschiedenis;
                 Ontdekkingen; Ontdekkingsreizen; Wetenschap;
                 Entdeckung; Geschichte; Naturwissenschaften; Histoire;
                 D{\'e}couvertes g{\'e}ographiques; D{\'e}couvertes
                 scientifiques; Discoveries (in geography); History;
                 Exploration; Discoveries (in geography.); Entdeckung;
                 Geschichte; Naturwissenschaften",
  tableofcontents = "A Personal Note to the Reader / xv \\
                 Time \\
                 The Heavenly Empire \\
                 The Temptations of the Moon / 4 \\
                 The Week: Gateway to Science / 12 \\
                 God and the Astrologers / 19 \\
                 From Sun Time to Clock Time \\
                 Measuring the Dark Hours / 26 \\
                 The Rise of the Equal Hour / 36 \\
                 Making Time Portable / 46 \\
                 The Missionary Clock \\
                 Open Sesame to China / 56 \\
                 Mother of Machines / 64 \\
                 Why It Happened in the West / 72 \\
                 The Earth and the Seas \\
                 The Geography of the Imagination \\
                 The Awe of Mountains / 82 \\
                 Charting Heaven and Hell / 86 \\
                 The Appeal of Symmetry / 92 \\
                 The Prison of Christian Dogma / 100 \\
                 A Flat Earth Returns / 107 \\
                 Paths to the East \\
                 Pilgrims and Crusaders / 116 \\
                 How the Mongols Opened the Way / 124 \\
                 Missionary Diplomats / 128 \\
                 The Discovery of Asia / 134 \\
                 The Land Curtain Comes Down / 139 \\
                 Doubling the World \\
                 Ptolemy Revived and Revised / 146 \\
                 Portuguese Sea Pioneers / 156 \\
                 Beyond the Threatening Cape / 165 \\
                 To India and Back / 172 \\
                 Why Not the Arabs? / 178 \\
                 The Chinese Reach Out / 186 \\
                 An Empire without Wants / 195 \\
                 The American Surprise \\
                 The Wandering Vikings / 204 \\
                 Dead End in Vinland / 209 \\
                 The Power of the Winds / 217 \\
                 ``The Enterprise of the Indies'' / 224 \\
                 Fair Winds, Soft Words, and Luck / 231 \\
                 Paradise Found and Lost / 235 \\
                 Naming the Unknown / 244 \\
                 Sea Paths to Everywhere \\
                 A World of Oceans / 256 \\
                 The Reign of Secrecy / 267 \\
                 Knowledge Becomes Merchandise / 271 \\
                 The Ardors of Negative Discovery / 278 \\
                 Nature \\
                 Seeing the Invisible \\
                 Into ``the Mists of Paradox'' / 294 \\
                 The Witness of the Naked Eye / 305 \\
                 A Vision Troubled and Surprised / 312 \\
                 Caught in the Cross Fire / 322 \\
                 New Worlds Within / 327 \\
                 Galileo in China / 332 \\
                 Inside Ourselves \\
                 A Mad Prophet Points the Way / 338 \\
                 The Tyranny of Galen / 344 \\
                 From Animals to Man / 351 \\
                 Unseen Currents Within / 361 \\
                 From Qualities to Quantities / 368 \\
                 ``The Microscope of Nature'' / 376 \\
                 Science Goes Public \\
                 A Parliament of Scientists / 386 \\
                 From Experience to Experiment / 394 \\
                 ``God Said, Let Newton Be!'' / 401 \\
                 Priority Becomes the Prize / 408 \\
                 Cataloguing the Whole Creation \\
                 Learning to Look / 420 \\
                 The Invention of Species / 429 \\
                 Specimen Hunting / 436 \\
                 Stretching the Past / 446 \\
                 In Search of the Missing Link / 457 \\
                 Paths to Evolution / 464 \\
                 Society \\
                 Widening the Communities of Knowledge \\
                 The Lost Arts of Memory / 480 \\
                 Empire of the Learned / 489 \\
                 The Duplicating Impulse / 498 \\
                 ``The Art of Artificial Writing'' / 510 \\
                 Communities of the Vernacular / 517 \\
                 Transforming the Book / 524 \\
                 Books Go Public / 533 \\
                 The Island of Islam / 539 \\
                 Toward a World Literature / 547 \\
                 Opening the Past \\
                 The Birth of History / 558 \\
                 Christianity Gives Direction / 566 \\
                 Revising the Record / 574 \\
                 Explorers among the Ruins / 581 \\
                 ``To Wake the Dead'' / 588 \\
                 Latitudes of Time / 596 \\
                 The Discovery of Prehistory / 603 \\
                 Hidden Dimensions: History as Therapy / 613 \\
                 Surveying the Present \\
                 ``All Mankind Is One'' / 626 \\
                 The Shock of the Primitive / 636 \\
                 A Science of Culture / 646 \\
                 An Expanding Universe of Wealth / 652 \\
                 Learning from Numbers / 667 \\
                 The Infinite and the Infinitesimal / 675 \\
                 Some Reference Notes / 685 \\
                 Acknowledgments / 715 \\
                 Index / 719",
}

@Book{Boorstin:1992:C,
  author =       "Daniel J. Boorstin",
  title =        "The Creators",
  publisher =    pub-VINTAGE,
  address =      pub-VINTAGE:adr,
  pages =        "xiv + 811",
  year =         "1992",
  ISBN =         "0-394-54395-5 (hardcover), 0-679-74375-8 (paperback)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-394-54395-6 (hardcover), 978-0-679-74375-0
                 (paperback)",
  LCCN =         "CB69.B65 1993",
  bibdate =      "Wed Apr 6 23:40:26 1994",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  abstract =     "A narrative of the great figures who have created our
                 cultural heritage, from the pyramid builders to
                 Picasso, enriching our world with architecture,
                 painting, sculpture, music, drama, dance, and
                 literature.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  shorttableofcontents = "The riddle of creation: a prologue \\
                 Part 1: Worlds without beginning \\
                 Part 2: A creator-God \\
                 Book 1: Creator man \\
                 Part 3: The power of stone \\
                 Part 4: The magic of images \\
                 Part 5: The immortal world \\
                 Book 2: Recreating the world \\
                 Part 6: Otherworldly elements \\
                 Part 7: The human comedy: a composite work \\
                 Part 8: From craftsman to artist \\
                 Part 9: Composing for the community \\
                 Part 10: Conjuring with time and space \\
                 Book 3: Creating the self \\
                 Part 11: The vanguard world \\
                 Part 12: The wilderness within",
  tableofcontents = "The riddle of creation: a prologue \\
                 Part 1: Worlds without beginning \\
                 1: The dazzled vision of the Hindus \\
                 2: The indifference of Confucius \\
                 3: The silence of the Buddha \\
                 4: The Homeric scripture of the Greeks \\
                 Part 2: A creator-God \\
                 5: The intimate God of Moses \\
                 6: The birth of theology \\
                 7: The innovative God of Saint Augustine \\
                 8: The uncreated Koran \\
                 Book 1: Creator man \\
                 Part 3: The power of stone \\
                 9: The mystery of megaliths \\
                 10: Castles of eternity \\
                 11: Temples of community \\
                 12: Orders for survival \\
                 13: Artificial stone: a Roman revolution \\
                 14: Dome of the world \\
                 15: The great church \\
                 16: A road not taken: the Japanese triumph of wood \\
                 Part 4: The magic of images \\
                 17: The awe of images \\
                 18: Human hieroglyphs \\
                 19: The athletic ideal \\
                 20: For family, empire \\
                 and history \\
                 21: The healing image \\
                 22: ``Satan's handiwork'' \\
                 Part 5: The immortal word \\
                 23: Dionysus the twice-born \\
                 24: The birth of the spectator: from ritual to drama
                 \\
                 25: The mirror of comedy \\
                 26: The arts of prose and persuasion \\
                 Book 2: Re-creating the world \\
                 Part 6: Otherworldly elements \\
                 27: The consoling past \\
                 28: The music of the word \\
                 29: An architecture of light \\
                 30: Adventures in death \\
                 Part 7: The human comedy: a composite work \\
                 31: Escaping the plague \\
                 32: Joys of pilgrimage \\
                 33: ``In the land of booze and bibbers'' \\
                 34: Adventures in madness \\
                 35: The spectator reborn \\
                 36: The freedom to choose \\
                 37: Sagas of ancient empire \\
                 38: New-world epics \\
                 39: A mosaic of novels \\
                 40: In love with the public \\
                 Part 8: From craftsman to artist \\
                 41: Archetypes brought to life \\
                 42: Roman afterlives \\
                 43: The mysteries of light: from a walk to a window \\
                 44: Sovereign of the visible world \\
                 45: ``Divine Michelangelo'' \\
                 46: The painted word: the inward path of Tao \\
                 Part 9. Composing for the community \\
                 47: A protestant music \\
                 48: The music of instruments: from court to concert \\
                 49: New worlds for the orchestra \\
                 50: The music of risorgimento \\
                 51: A Germanic union of the arts \\
                 52: The ephemeral art of the dance \\
                 53: The music of innovation \\
                 Part 10: Conjuring with time and space \\
                 54: The painted moment \\
                 55: The power of light: ``The pencil of nature'' \\
                 56: The rise of the skyscraper \\
                 Book 3: Creating the self \\
                 Part 11: The vanguard word \\
                 57: Inventing the essay \\
                 58: The art of being truthful: confessions \\
                 59: The arts of seeming truthful: autobiography \\
                 60: Intimate biography \\
                 61: The heroic self \\
                 62: Songs of the self \\
                 63: In a dry season \\
                 Part 12: The wilderness within \\
                 64: An American at sea \\
                 65: Sagas of the Russian soul \\
                 66: Journey to the interior \\
                 67: The garden of involuntary memory \\
                 68: The filigreed self \\
                 69: ``I too am here!'' \\
                 70: Vistas from a restless self \\
                 Epilogue: Mysteries of a public art",
}

@Book{Booth:2008:CR,
  author =       "Wayne C. Booth and Gregory G. Colomb and Joseph M.
                 Williams",
  title =        "The craft of research",
  publisher =    pub-U-CHICAGO,
  address =      pub-U-CHICAGO:adr,
  edition =      "Third",
  pages =        "xvii + 317",
  year =         "2008",
  ISBN =         "0-226-06565-0 (cloth), 0-226-06566-9 (paperback)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-226-06565-6 (cloth), 978-0-226-06566-3
                 (paperback)",
  LCCN =         "Q180.55.M4 B66 2008",
  bibdate =      "Sun Jun 26 10:03:49 MDT 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 z3950.loc.gov:7090/Voyager",
  series =       "Chicago guides to writing, editing, and publishing",
  URL =          "http://www.loc.gov/catdir/enhancements/fy0828/2007042761-b.htm;
                 http://www.loc.gov/catdir/enhancements/fy0828/2007042761-d.htm;
                 http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip082/2007042761.htm",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  libnote =      "Not in my library.",
  subject =      "research; methodology; technical writing",
  tableofcontents = "Research, researchers, and readers \\
                 Prologue: Becoming a researcher \\
                 Thinking in print: Uses of research, public and private
                 \\
                 Connecting with your reader: (Re-)creating yourself and
                 your audience \\
                 Asking questions, finding answers \\
                 Prologue: Planning your project --- an overview \\
                 From topics to questions \\
                 From questions to a problem \\
                 From problems to sources \\
                 Engaging sources \\
                 Making a claim and supporting it \\
                 Prologue: Assembling a research argument \\
                 Making good arguments: Overview \\
                 Making claims \\
                 Assembling reasons and evidence \\
                 Acknowledgments and responses \\
                 Warrants \\
                 Planning, drafting, and revising \\
                 Prologue: Planning again \\
                 Planning \\
                 Drafting your report \\
                 Revising your organization and argument \\
                 Communicating evidence visually \\
                 Introductions and conclusions-- Revising style: Telling
                 your story clearly \\
                 Some last considerations",
}

@Book{Borceux:1990:LPT,
  author =       "Francis Borceux",
  title =        "{\LaTeX}: la perfection dans le traitement du texte",
  publisher =    pub-CIAOCO,
  address =      pub-CIAOCO:adr,
  year =         "1990",
  ISBN =         "2-87085-194-4",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-2-87085-194-4",
  LCCN =         "????",
  bibdate =      "Wed Dec 15 08:46:36 1993",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/texbook3.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Borde:1992:TE,
  author =       "Arvind Borde",
  title =        "{\TeX} by Example",
  publisher =    pub-ACADEMIC,
  address =      pub-ACADEMIC:adr,
  pages =        "xiv + 169",
  year =         "1992",
  ISBN =         "0-12-117650-9",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-12-117650-1",
  LCCN =         "Z253.4.T47 B67 1992",
  bibdate =      "Tue Dec 14 22:41:14 1993",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  ZMnumber =     "0757.68004",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Borde:1993:MTE,
  author =       "Arvind Borde",
  title =        "Mathematical {\TeX} by Example",
  publisher =    pub-ACADEMIC,
  address =      pub-ACADEMIC:adr,
  pages =        "xii + 352",
  year =         "1993",
  ISBN =         "0-12-117645-2, 0-12-155940-8",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-12-117645-7, 978-0-12-155940-3",
  LCCN =         "Z253.4.T47 B67 1993",
  bibdate =      "Mon Jul 19 15:22:37 1993",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/texbook3.bib",
  ZMnumber =     "0799.68001",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  tableofcontents = "Introduction \\
                 Examples \\
                 A Summary of AmSTeX \\
                 Other Packages \\
                 Typefaces \\
                 Code \\
                 Bibliography \\
                 Glossary/Index \\
                 Table of Contents",
}

@Book{Born:1969:AP,
  author =       "Max Born and R. J. (Roger John) Blin-Stoyle and J. M.
                 Radcliffe",
  title =        "Atomic Physics",
  publisher =    pub-DOVER,
  address =      pub-DOVER:adr,
  edition =      "Eighth",
  pages =        "xiv + 495 + 11",
  year =         "1969",
  ISBN =         "0-486-65984-4",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-486-65984-8",
  LCCN =         "QC776 .B5713 1989",
  bibdate =      "Wed Apr 9 10:19:44 MDT 2008",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/bibnet/authors/b/bohr-niels.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/bibnet/authors/b/born-max.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/bibnet/authors/d/debroglie-louis.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/bibnet/authors/h/heisenberg-werner.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/bibnet/authors/p/pauli-wolfgang.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/bibnet/authors/r/rutherford-ernest.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/bibnet/authors/s/schroedinger-erwin.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/einstein.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 z3950.loc.gov:7090/Voyager",
  price =        "US\$11.95",
  series =       "Dover books on physics and chemistry",
  URL =          "http://www.loc.gov/catdir/description/dover031/89012033.html",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  author-dates = "Max Born (1882--1970)",
  KSnumber =     "14",
  remark =       "Translation of \booktitle{Moderne Physik}. Reprint.
                 Originally published: 8th edition, London: Blackie,
                 1969.",
  subject =      "atomic physics; nuclear physics",
  tableofcontents = "I: Kinetic Theory of Gases \\
                 1. Atomic Theory in Chemistry \\
                 2. Fundamental Assumptions of the Kinetic Theory of
                 Gases \\
                 3. Calculation of the Pressure of a Gas \\
                 4. Temperature of a Gas \\
                 5. Specific Heat \\
                 6. Law of Distribution of Energy and Velocity \\
                 7. Free Path \\
                 8. Determination of Avogadro's Number \\
                 II: Elementary Particles \\
                 1. Conduction of Electricity in Rarefied Gases \\
                 2. Canal Rays and Anode Rays (Positive Rays) \\
                 3. X-rays \\
                 4. Radiations from Radioactive Substances \\
                 5. ``Prout's Hypothesis, Isotopy, the Proton'' \\
                 6. The Neutron \\
                 7. Cosmic Rays. Positrons \\
                 8. Mesons and Nuclear Forces \\
                 III: The Nuclear Atom \\
                 1. Lorentz's Electron Theory \\
                 2. The Theorem of the Inertia of Energy \\
                 3. Investigation of Atomic Structure by Scattering
                 Experiments \\
                 4. Mass Defect and Nuclear Binding Energy. The Neutrino
                 \\
                 5. Heavy Hydrogen and Heavy Water \\
                 6. Nuclear Reactions and Radioactive Decay \\
                 IV: Wave-Corpuscles \\
                 1. Wave Theory of Light. Interference and Diffraction
                 \\
                 2. Light Quanta \\
                 3. Quantum Theory of the Atom \\
                 4. Compton Effect \\
                 5. Wave Nature of Matter. De Broglie's Theory \\
                 6. Experimental Demonstration of Matter Waves \\
                 7. ``The Contradiction between the Wave Theory and the
                 Corpuscular Theory, and its Removal'' \\
                 V: Atomic Structure and Spectral Lines \\
                 1. The Bohr Atom; Stationary Orbits for Simply Periodic
                 Motions \\
                 2. Quantum Conditions for Simply and Multiply Periodic
                 Motions \\
                 3. Matrix Mechanics \\
                 4. Wave Mechanics \\
                 5. Angular Momentum in Wave Mechanics \\
                 6. Parity \\
                 7. The Statistical Interpretation of Wave Mechanics \\
                 8. Emission and Absorption of Radiation \\
                 VI: Spin of the Electron and Pauli's Principle \\
                 1. Alkali Doublets and the Spinning Electron \\
                 2. The Anomalous Zeeman Effect \\
                 3. The Hydrogen Atom and X-ray Terms \\
                 4. The Helium Atom \\
                 5. Pauli's Exclusion Principle \\
                 6. The Periodic System. Closed Shells \\
                 7. Magnetism \\
                 8. Wave Theory of the Spin Electron \\
                 9. Density of the Electronic Cloud \\
                 VII: Quantum Statistics \\
                 1. Heat Radiation and Planck's Law \\
                 2. Specific Heat of Solids and of Polyatomic Gases \\
                 3. Quantisation of Black Body Radiation \\
                 4. Bose-Einstein Statistics of Light Quanta \\
                 5. Einstein's Theory of Gas Degeneration \\
                 6. Fermi-Dirac Statistics \\
                 7. Electron Theory of Metals. Energy Distribution \\
                 8. Thermionic and Photoelectric Effect in Metals \\
                 9. Magnetism of the Electron Gas \\
                 10. Electrical and Thermal Conductivity.
                 Thermoelectricity \\
                 VIII: Molecular Structure \\
                 1. Molecular Properties as an Expression of the
                 Distribution of Charge in the Electronic Cloud \\
                 2. Experimental Determination of the Molecular
                 Constants \\
                 3. Band Spectra and the Raman Effect \\
                 4. Chemical Binding. Classification of Types of Binding
                 \\
                 5. Theory of Heteropolar Ionic Binding \\
                 6. Theory of Co-valency Binding \\
                 7. Theory of van der Waals Forces and other Types of
                 Binding \\
                 IX: Quantum Theory of Solids \\
                 1. Introduction \\
                 2. Modes of Lattice Vibration \\
                 3. Quantisation of the Lattice Vibrations \\
                 4. Inelastic Scattering of Neutrons \\
                 5. The M{\"o}ssbauer Effect \\
                 6. Electrons in a Periodic Lattice Band \\
                 7. Metals and Insulators \\
                 8. Metals \\
                 9. Superconductivity \\
                 10. Ferromagnetism \\
                 11. Insulators and Semiconductors \\
                 X: Nuclear Physics \\
                 1. The Size of the Nucleus and a-Decay \\
                 2. Angular Momentum and Magnetic Moment \\
                 3. The Deuteron and Nuclear Forces \\
                 4. Nuclear Structure and Nuclear Saturation \\
                 5. The Nuclear Shell Model \\
                 6. The Nuclear Collective Model \\
                 7. $\beta$-Decay and K-Capture \\
                 8. Nuclear Electromagnetic Interactions \\
                 9. ``The Drop Model, Nuclear Reactions and Fission ``
                 \\
                 10. Conclusion by M. Born \\
                 Appendices \\
                 I. Evaluation of Some Integrals Connected with the
                 Kinetic Theory of Gases \\
                 II. ``Heat Conduction, Viscosity, and Diffusion'' \\
                 III. Van der Waals' Equation of State \\
                 IV. The Mean Square Deviation \\
                 V. Theory of Relativity \\
                 VI. Electron Theory \\
                 VII. The Theorem of the Inertia of Energy \\
                 VIII. Calculation of the Coefficient of Scattering for
                 Radiation by a Free Particle \\
                 IX. Rutherford's Scattering Formula for a-rays \\
                 X. The Compton Effect \\
                 XI. Phase Velocity and Group Velocity \\
                 XII. Elementary Derivation of Heisenberg's Uncertainty
                 Relation \\
                 XIII. Hamiltonian Theory and Action Variables \\
                 XIV. Quantisation of the Elliptic Orbits in Bohr's
                 Theory \\
                 XV. The Oscillator according to Matrix Mechanics \\
                 XVI. The Oscillator according to Wave Mechanics \\
                 XVII. The Vibrations of a Circular Membrane \\
                 XVIII. Solution of Schr{\"o}dinger's Equation for the
                 Kepler (Central Force) Problem \\
                 XIX. The Orbital Angular Momentum \\
                 XX. Deduction of Rutherford's Scattering Formula by
                 Wave Mechanics \\
                 XXI. Deduction of the Selection Rules for Electric
                 Dipole Radiation \\
                 XXII. Anomalous Zeeman Effect of the D Lines of Sodium
                 \\
                 XXIII. Enumeration of the Terms in the Case of Two
                 p-Electrons \\
                 XXIV. Atomic Form Factor \\
                 XXV. The Formalism of Quantum Mechanics \\
                 XXVI. General Proof of the Uncertainty Relation \\
                 XXVII. Transition Probabilities \\
                 XXVIII. Quantum Theory of Emission of Radiation \\
                 XXIX. The Electrostatic Energy of Nuclei \\
                 XXX. Theory of a-Disintegration \\
                 XXXI. The Ground State of the Deuteron \\
                 XXXII. Meson Theory \\
                 XXXIII. The Stefan--Boltzmann Law and Wien's
                 Displacement Law \\
                 XXXIV. Absorption by an Oscillator \\
                 XXXV. Temperature and Entropy in Quantum Statistics \\
                 XXXVI. Thermionic Emission of Electrons \\
                 XXXVII. Temperature Variation of Paramagnetism \\
                 XXXVIII. Theory of Co-valency Binding \\
                 XXXIX. Time-independent Perturbation Theory for
                 Non-degenerate States \\
                 XL. Theory of the van der Waals Forces \\
                 XLI. The Modes of Vibration of a Linear Monatomic Chain
                 \\
                 Bibliography \\
                 Index",
}

@Book{Born:1995:FFH,
  author =       "G{\"u}nter Born",
  title =        "The File Formats Handbook",
  publisher =    pub-ITCP,
  address =      pub-ITCP:adr,
  pages =        "xvii + 1274",
  year =         "1995",
  ISBN =         "1-85032-117-5, 1-85032-128-0",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-1-85032-117-0, 978-1-85032-128-6",
  LCCN =         "QA76.9.F5 B67 1995",
  bibdate =      "Mon May 11 11:43:52 1998",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/datacompression.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sgml.bib",
  price =        "US\$59.95",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  annote =       "{\em From the publisher\/}: Formats covered include:
                 Database and index files for DBASE and Foxpro;
                 Spreadsheet file formats for Lotus 1-2-3, Excel, DIF,
                 SIF, SYLK; Word processing file formats for WORD for
                 DOS, Wordperfect, Wordstar, AMI Pro, SGML, and the Rich
                 Text Format (RTF).",
  tableofcontents = "Preface \\
                 ATM: An Introduction \\
                 Demands on Today's Data Communications Technologies \\
                 The Evolution of Data Transmission Technologies \\
                 Contemporary Bandwidth Requirements \\
                 Communication Technologies for High-Speed Networks \\
                 Broadband Communication Systems and High-Speed Networks
                 \\
                 Leased Lines \\
                 ISDN: The Integrated Services Digital Network \\
                 Frame Relay \\
                 xDSL: Digital Subscriber Lines \\
                 SONET/SDH: The Synchronous Digital Hierarchy \\
                 DQDB-Based MANs (Metropolitan Area Networks): CBDS/SMDS
                 \\
                 Fiber Channel \\
                 High-Speed LANs \\
                 B-ISDN and ATM \\
                 ATM: Technology for Converged, QoS-Based Networks \\
                 In Search of New Technologies \\
                 The Limitations of Ethernet Networks \\
                 The Limitations of Token Ring and FDDI Networks \\
                 ATM: Technology for Converged, QoS-Based Networks \\
                 The Limitations of ISDN \\
                 The Limitations of Packet over SONET/SDH \\
                 ATM: Foundation for Large-Scale Converged Networks \\
                 ATM in Local and Wide Area Networks \\
                 ATM: Technology and Standards \\
                 Asynchronous Transfer Mode \\
                 Communication Basics \\
                 Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) \\
                 The Structure of ATM \\
                 The B-ISDN Reference Model \\
                 B-ISDN Networks: Configuration and Reference Points \\
                 ATM: The Physical Layer \\
                 Transmission Convergence \\
                 ATM Data Rates \\
                 ATM in PDH Networks \\
                 ATM in SDH and SONET Networks \\
                 ATM Transport Over SDH/SONET Networks \\
                 Cell-Based Physical Layer \\
                 Physical Layer Monitoring in ATM Networks: OAM Flows
                 F1-F3 \\
                 The ATM Protocol: The ATM Layer \\
                 The ATM Cell \\
                 The ATM Layer: User Plane Functions \\
                 The ATM Layer: Management Plane Functions \\
                 Metasignaling \\
                 The ATM Protocol: The ATM Adaptation Layer \\
                 ATM Adaptation Layer Type 1 (AAL-1) \\
                 ATM Adaptation Layer Type 2 (AAL-2) \\
                 ATM Adaptation Layer Type 3/4 (AAL-3/4) \\
                 ATM Adaptation Layer Type 5 (AAL-5) \\
                 The Signaling ATM Adaptation Layer \\
                 Frame-Based ATM \\
                 ATM over DXI Interfaces \\
                 Frame-Based User-to-Network Interface (FUN) \\
                 Frame-Based ATM over SONET/SDH Transport (FAST) \\
                 Frame-Based ATM Transport over Ethernet (FATE) \\
                 The ATM Protocol: UNI Signaling \\
                 The UNI Signaling Message Format \\
                 The Basic Signaling Processes \\
                 UNI Connection Setup: The Calling Station \\
                 Connection Setup at the Station Called \\
                 Connection Clear-Down \\
                 Connection Restart \\
                 Error Handling \\
                 Comparing ITU-T and ATM Forum UNI Signaling \\
                 The ATM Protocol: NNI Signaling (B-ISUP, PNNI, AINI)
                 \\
                 B-ISUP Signaling. The PNNI Protocol \\
                 ATM Interworking \\
                 ATM-LAN Interworking \\
                 ATM-Frame Relay Interworking \\
                 ATM-MAN Interworking \\
                 Loop Emulation Service \\
                 ATM Network Management \\
                 The ATM MIB Groups \\
                 ILMI and SNMP \\
                 The Link Management MIB Module \\
                 The Address Registration MIB Module \\
                 ATM Networks: Design and Planning \\
                 Designing and Planning ATM Networks \\
                 ATM End Systems \\
                 Planning ATM Workgroups \\
                 Design and Planning of ATM Backbones \\
                 Testing and Choosing Network Components \\
                 Application-Related Performance Parameters for ATM
                 Components \\
                 Security in ATM Networks \\
                 Risk Factor",
}

@Book{Bornemann:2004:SDC,
  author =       "Folkma Bornemann and Dirk Laurie and Stan Wagon and
                 J{\"o}rg Waldvogel",
  title =        "The {SIAM} 100-digit challenge: a study in
                 high-accuracy numerical computing",
  publisher =    pub-SIAM,
  address =      pub-SIAM:adr,
  pages =        "xii + 306",
  year =         "2004",
  ISBN =         "0-89871-561-X",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-89871-561-3",
  LCCN =         "QA297 .S4782 2004",
  MRclass =      "65-02",
  MRnumber =     "MR2076374 (2005c:65002)",
  bibdate =      "Mon Feb 07 15:54:44 2005",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  URL =          "http://www.ams.org/msnmain?fmt=doc&fn=105&id=2076374&l=20&pg3=IID&r=1&s3=254928&v3=Bornemann%2C%20Folkmar",
  abstract =     "\booktitle{The SIAM 100-Digit Challenge: A Study in
                 High-Accuracy Numerical Computing} gives concrete
                 examples of how to justify the validity of every single
                 digit of a numerical answer. Methods range from
                 carefully designed computer experiments to a posteriori
                 error estimates and computer-assisted proofs based on
                 interval arithmetic. This book will aid readers in
                 developing problem-solving skills for making judicious
                 method selections. Full code for all the methods,
                 examples, tables, and figures is given on the
                 accompanying web page.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  libnote =      "Not in my library.",
  remark =       "The book is a collection of solutions to ten problems
                 posed by Lloyd N. Trefethen that require very high
                 precision computation to solve correctly. The
                 MathSciNet review at the indicated URL gives a good
                 overview.",
  tableofcontents = "Foreword \\
                 Preface \\
                 The Story \\
                 1: A Twisted Tail \\
                 2: Reliability amid Chaos \\
                 3: How Far Away Is Infinity? \\
                 4: Think Globally, Act Locally \\
                 5: A Complex Optimization \\
                 6: Biasing for a Fair Return \\
                 7: Too Large to Be Easy, Too Small to Be Hard \\
                 8: In the Moment of Heat \\
                 9: Gradus ad Parnassum \\
                 10: Hitting the Ends \\
                 Appendix A: Convergence Acceleration \\
                 Appendix B: Extreme Digit-Hunting \\
                 Appendix C: Code \\
                 Appendix D: More Problems \\
                 References \\
                 Index",
}

@Book{Borwein:2004:EMCa,
  author =       "Jonathan M. Borwein and David H. Bailey and Roland
                 Girgensohn",
  title =        "Experimentation in mathematics: computational paths to
                 discovery",
  publisher =    pub-A-K-PETERS,
  address =      pub-A-K-PETERS:adr,
  pages =        "x + 357",
  year =         "2004",
  ISBN =         "1-56881-136-5",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-1-56881-136-9",
  LCCN =         "QA12 .B67 2004",
  MRclass =      "11-01 (11Yxx 40-01 42A16 42A38 68W30)",
  MRnumber =     "2051473",
  MRreviewer =   "F. Beukers",
  bibdate =      "Wed Aug 10 11:09:47 2016",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/bibnet/authors/b/borwein-jonathan-m.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  shorttableofcontents = "Sequences, series, products and integrals / 1
                 \\
                 Fourier series and integrals / 69 \\
                 Zeta functions and multizeta functions / 131 \\
                 Partitions and powers / 183 \\
                 Primes and polynomials / 225 \\
                 The power of constructive proofs II / 263 \\
                 Numerical techniques II / 299",
  tableofcontents = "",
  xxyear =       "2003",
}

@Book{Borwein:2004:MEP,
  author =       "Jonathan M. Borwein and David H. Bailey",
  title =        "Mathematics by Experiment: Plausible Reasoning in the
                 {21st Century}",
  publisher =    pub-A-K-PETERS,
  address =      pub-A-K-PETERS:adr,
  pages =        "x + 288",
  year =         "2004",
  ISBN =         "1-56881-211-6",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-1-56881-211-3",
  LCCN =         "QA76.95 .B67 2003",
  MRclass =      "00A35",
  MRnumber =     "2033012",
  MRreviewer =   "John H. Mason",
  bibdate =      "Fri Oct 17 10:38:25 2003",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/bibnet/authors/b/borwein-jonathan-m.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  price =        "US\$45.00",
  URL =          "http://docserver.carma.newcastle.edu.au/272/",
  abstract =     "Using examples that truly represent the experimental
                 methodology, this book provides the historical context
                 of, and rationale behind, experimental mathematics. It
                 shows how today, the use of advanced computing
                 technology provides, mathematicians with an amazing,
                 previously unimaginable ``laboratory,'' in which
                 examples can be analyzed, new ideas tested, and
                 patterns discovered. This is a perfect introduction to
                 the history and current state of research and
                 technology in the growing field of experimental
                 mathematics.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  remark =       "Due to an unfortunate error, some of the citations in
                 the book point to the wrong item in the Bibliography.
                 Here is how to find the correct citation number:
                 [1]--[85]: Citation number is correct; [86, page 100]:
                 [86]; [86, page 2]: [87]; [87]--[156]: Add one to
                 citation number; [157]: [159]; [158, page 139]: [158];
                 [158, page 97]: [160]; [159]--[196]: Add two to
                 citation number",
  tableofcontents = "What is Experimental Mathematics? \\
                 Experimental Mathematics in Action \\
                 Pi and Its Friends \\
                 Normality of Numbers \\
                 The Power of Constructive Proofs I \\
                 Numerical Techniques I \\
                 Making Sense of Experimental Math",
}

@Book{Borwein:2009:CCI,
  author =       "Jonathan M. Borwein and Keith J. Devlin",
  title =        "The computer as crucible: an introduction to
                 experimental mathematics",
  publisher =    pub-A-K-PETERS,
  address =      pub-A-K-PETERS:adr,
  pages =        "xi + 158",
  year =         "2009",
  ISBN =         "1-56881-343-0",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-1-56881-343-1",
  LCCN =         "QA8.7 .B67 2009",
  MRclass =      "00A35 (11-04 11Y16 11Y60)",
  MRnumber =     "2464847",
  MRreviewer =   "Samuel S. Wagstaff, Jr.",
  bibdate =      "Tue Nov 10 17:48:24 MST 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/bibnet/authors/b/borwein-jonathan-m.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 z3950.loc.gov:7090/Voyager",
  URL =          "http://docserver.carma.newcastle.edu.au/1730/;
                 http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/fy0904/2008022180.html",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  libnote =      "Not in my library.",
  subject =      "Experimental mathematics",
  tableofcontents = "What is experimental mathematics? \\
                 What is the quadrillionth decimal place of $pi$? \\
                 What is that number? \\
                 The most important function in mathematics \\
                 Evaluate the following integral \\
                 Serendipity \\
                 Calculating [pi] \\
                 The computer knows more math than you do \\
                 Take it to the limit \\
                 Danger! Always exercise caution when using the computer
                 \\
                 Stuff we left out (until now)",
}

@Book{Borwein:2014:NFI,
  author =       "Jonathan M. Borwein and Alfred Jacobus van der Poorten
                 and Jeffrey Outlaw Shallit and Wadim Zudilin",
  title =        "Neverending Fractions: an Introduction to Continued
                 Fractions",
  volume =       "23",
  publisher =    pub-CAMBRIDGE,
  address =      pub-CAMBRIDGE:adr,
  pages =        "x + 212",
  year =         "2014",
  DOI =          "https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511902659",
  ISBN =         "0-521-18649-8",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-521-18649-0",
  LCCN =         "QA295 .B667 2014",
  MRclass =      "11A55 (11J70 40-01 40A15)",
  MRnumber =     "3468515",
  bibdate =      "Thu Jun 12 08:53:05 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/bibnet/authors/b/borwein-jonathan-m.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 z3950.loc.gov:7090/Voyager",
  series =       "Australian Mathematical Society lecture series",
  URL =          "http://docserver.carma.newcastle.edu.au/1722/;
                 http://ebooks.cambridge.org/ebook.jsf?bid=CBO9780511902659",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  subject =      "Continued fractions; Processes, Infinite; Fractions",
  tableofcontents = "Preface \\
                 1. Some preliminaries from number theory \\
                 2. Continued fractions, as they are \\
                 3. Metric theory of continued fractions \\
                 4. Quadratic irrationals through a magnifier \\
                 5. Hyperelliptic curves and Somos sequences \\
                 6. From folding to Fibonacci \\
                 7. The integer part of $q \alpha + \beta$ \\
                 8. The Erd{\H{o}}s--Moser equation \\
                 9. Irregular continued fractions \\
                 Appendix. Selected continued fractions \\
                 Bibliography \\
                 Index",
}

@Book{Boslaugh:1999:WCW,
  author =       "David L. Boslaugh",
  title =        "When Computers Went to Sea: The Digitization of the
                 {United States Navy}",
  publisher =    pub-IEEE,
  address =      pub-IEEE:adr,
  pages =        "xxiv + 467",
  year =         "1999",
  ISBN =         "0-7695-0024-2",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-7695-0024-9",
  LCCN =         "Q175.N438 1997; VB212 .B67 1999",
  bibdate =      "Wed Jan 27 06:33:19 1999",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  note =         "IEEE catalog number BP000024.",
  price =        "US\$35.00",
  URL =          "http://www.loc.gov/catdir/enhancements/fy0706/99024731-d.html;
                 http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/wiley031/99024731.html",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  libnote =      "Not in my library.",
  tableofcontents = "Radar --- New Eyes for the Fleet \\
                 Beginnings of Radar \\
                 May Day--24 October 1944 \\
                 Creation of Radar in the U.S. Navy \\
                 Start of the Naval Research Laboratory Radio Location
                 Project \\
                 Tracking Projectiles in Flight --- The Battleship New
                 York Tests \\
                 The Plan Position Indicator \\
                 The Baby Gets a Name \\
                 Mass Production \\
                 London --- An Easy Target \\
                 Chain Home \\
                 Learning to Use Radar at Sea \\
                 The Most Valuable Cargo \\
                 Radar at War in the Pacific \\
                 McNally's Day of Infamy \\
                 Aboard Lexington \\
                 Aboard the Flying Boats \\
                 The Fighter Director Officers \\
                 CXAM in Action \\
                 Rest in Peace CXAM \\
                 The CXAM Lives On \\
                 Turning Point for McNally \\
                 Evolution of the Combat Information Center \\
                 The Kamikazes \\
                 Divine Wind \\
                 Floating Chrysanthemum \\
                 A Lingering Problem \\
                 Legacy of the Kamikazes \\
                 Legacy of Radar \\
                 Problems \\
                 Quest for Solutions \\
                 The Three Ts \\
                 The Guided Missile Frigates \\
                 Too Much Data and Not Enough Information \\
                 Three Digital Attempts \\
                 The Canadian Navy's Digial Automated Tracking and
                 Resolving System \\
                 Early Digital Experiments at the Navy Electronics
                 Laboratory \\
                 The Semi-Automatic Air Intercept Control System \\
                 Trouble with Analogs \\
                 The Royal Navy Comprehensive Display System \\
                 NRL's Electronic Data System \\
                 The Intercept Tracking and Control Console \\
                 Project COSMOS \\
                 Project CORNFIELD \\
                 The Codebreaking Computers --- A Digital Solution \\
                 The Navy Codebreakers \\
                 A Place Named Seesaw \\
                 From Steam to Electrons \\
                 A Machine Named Ice Cream \\
                 The Naval Computing Machine Laboratory",
}

@Book{Bottou:2007:LSK,
  editor =       "L{\'e}on Bottou and Olivier Chapelle and Dennis DeCost
                 and Jason Weston",
  title =        "Large-scale Kernel Machines",
  publisher =    pub-MIT,
  address =      pub-MIT:adr,
  pages =        "xii + 396",
  year =         "2007",
  ISBN =         "0-262-02625-2 (hardcover), 0-262-25579-0 (e-book)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-262-02625-3 (hardcover), 978-0-262-25579-0
                 (e-book)",
  LCCN =         "QA76.9.D35 L38 2007",
  bibdate =      "Tue Aug 19 15:27:40 MDT 2008",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 melvyl.cdlib.org:210/CDL90",
  series =       "Neural information processing series",
  URL =          "http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip078/2007000980.html",
  abstract =     "This volume offers researchers and engineers practical
                 solutions for learning from large-scale datasets, with
                 detailed descriptions of algorithms and experiments
                 carried out on realistically large datasets. At the
                 same time it offers researchers information that can
                 address the relative lack of theoretical grounding for
                 many useful algorithms.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  libnote =      "Not in my library.",
  subject =      "Data structures (Computer science); Machine learning",
  tableofcontents = "Support vector machine solvers / L{\'e}on Bottou
                 and Chih-Jen Lin \\
                 Training a support vector machine in the primal /
                 Olivier Chapelle \\
                 Fast kernel learning with sparse inverted index /
                 Patrick Haffner and Stephan Kanthak \\
                 Large-scale learning with string kernels / Soren
                 Sonnenburg, Gunnar Ratsch, and Konrad Rieck \\
                 Large-scale parallel SVM implementation / Igor
                 Durdanovic, Eric Cosatto, and Hans-Peter Graf \\
                 A distributed sequential solver for large-scale SVMs /
                 Elad Yom-Tov \\
                 Newton methods for fast semisupervised linear SVMs /
                 Vikas Sindhwani and S. Sathiya Keerthi \\
                 The improved Fast Gauss Transform with applications to
                 machine learning / Vikas Chandrakant Raykar and Ramani
                 Duraiswami \\
                 Approximation methods for Gaussian process regression /
                 Joaquin Qui{\"a}nonero-Candela, Carl Edward Rasmussen,
                 and Christopher K. I. Williams \\
                 Brisk kernel independent component analysis / Stefanie
                 Jegelka and Arthur Gretton \\
                 Building SVMs with reduced classifier complexity / S.
                 Sathiya Keerthi, Olivier Chapelle, and Dennis DeCost
                 \\
                 Trading convexity for scalability / Ronan Collobert
                 [and others] \\
                 Training invariant SVMs using selective sampling /
                 Gaelle Loosli, L{\'e}on Bottou, and St{\'e}phane Canu
                 \\
                 Scaling learning algorithms toward AI / Yoshua Bengio
                 and Yann LeCun",
}

@Book{Bourne:1990:UVU,
  author =       "Philip E. Bourne",
  title =        "{UNIX} for {VMS} Users",
  publisher =    pub-DP,
  address =      pub-DP:adr,
  pages =        "xvi + 368",
  year =         "1990",
  ISBN =         "1-55558-034-3",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-1-55558-034-6",
  LCCN =         "QA76.76.O63 B67 1989",
  bibdate =      "Tue Dec 14 22:41:28 1993",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Bowles:1977:MPS,
  author =       "Kenneth L. Bowles",
  title =        "Microcomputer Problem Solving Using {Pascal}",
  publisher =    pub-SV,
  address =      pub-SV:adr,
  pages =        "563",
  year =         "1977",
  DOI =          "https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4615-9998-2",
  ISBN =         "3-540-90286-4, 1-4615-9998-9 (e-book), 3-662-38578-3
                 (e-book)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-3-540-90286-7, 978-1-4615-9998-2 (e-book),
                 978-3-662-38578-4 (e-book)",
  LCCN =         "QA76.73.P2 .B68",
  bibdate =      "Wed Dec 15 07:57:08 1993",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  URL =          "http://link.springer.com/10.1007/978-3-662-38578-4",
  abstract =     "This book is designed both for introductory courses in
                 computer problem solving, at the freshman and sophomore
                 college level, and for individual self study. An
                 earlier version of the book has been used seven times
                 for teaching large introductory classes at University
                 of California San Diego (UCSD). This preface is
                 intended for the instructor, or for anyone
                 sophisticated enough in contemporary computing practice
                 to be able to advise the prospective student. The
                 amount of material presented has been completed by
                 about 55 percent of all students taking the course,
                 where UCSD schedules 10 weeks of classes in a quarter.
                 We have taught the course using Keller's Personalized
                 System of Instruction (PSI), though the organization of
                 the book does not require that plan to be used. PSI
                 methods allow slightly more material to be absorbed by
                 the students than is the case with the traditional
                 lecture/recitation presentation. PSI allows grading
                 according to the number of chapter units completed.
                 Virtually all students who pass the course at UCSD do
                 complete the first ten essential chapters and the
                 Exercises associated with them. For a conventional
                 presentation under the semester system, the 15 chapters
                 should present an appropriate amount of material. For a
                 conventional course under the quarter system, one might
                 not expect to complete more than the first 12 chapters
                 except on an extra credit basis.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  shorttableofcontents = "0. Introduction \\
                 1. Getting Started \\
                 2. Procedures and Variables \\
                 3. Controlling Program Flow, Repetition \\
                 4. More on Procedures \\
                 5. Working with Numbers \\
                 6. Handling Complex Program Structure \\
                 7. Data Input \\
                 8. Basic Data Structures \\
                 I. Arrays \\
                 9. Basic Data Structures \\
                 II. Sets \\
                 10. Basic Data Structures \\
                 III. Records \\
                 11. The GOTO Statement \\
                 12. Formatted Output \\
                 13. Searching \\
                 14. Sorting \\
                 I. Simple Algorithms \\
                 15. Sorting \\
                 II. Quicksort \\
                 Appendix A \\
                 Differences between UCSD's Pascal and Standard Pascal
                 \\
                 Appendix B \\
                 Glossary of Computer Jargon \\
                 Appendix C \\
                 Built-in Procedures and Functions \\
                 Appendix D \\
                 Index \\
                 Appendix E \\
                 Syntax Diagrams",
}

@Book{Bowman:1996:PSH,
  author =       "Judith S. Bowman and Sandra L. Emerson and Marcy
                 Darnovsky",
  title =        "The Practical {SQL} Handbook: Using {Structured Query
                 Language}",
  publisher =    pub-AW,
  address =      pub-AW:adr,
  edition =      "Third",
  pages =        "xxvi + 454",
  year =         "1996",
  ISBN =         "0-201-44787-8",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-201-44787-3",
  LCCN =         "QA76.73.S67 B69 1996",
  bibdate =      "Wed Mar 03 08:05:35 1999",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sqlbooks.bib",
  note =         "Includes CD-ROM.",
  price =        "US\$39.95",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  keywords =     "relational databases; SQL (computer program
                 language)",
  tableofcontents = "SQL and relational database management \\
                 Designing databases \\
                 Creating and filling a database \\
                 Selecting data from the database \\
                 Sorting data and other selection techniques \\
                 Grouping data and reporting from it \\
                 Joining tables for comprehensive data \\
                 Structuring queries with subqueries \\
                 Creating and using views \\
                 Security, transactions, performance, and integrity \\
                 Solving business problems \\
                 Mistakes and how to avoid them",
}

@Book{Bowman:2001:PSS,
  author =       "Judith S. Bowman",
  title =        "Practical {SQL}: the Sequel",
  publisher =    pub-AW,
  address =      pub-AW:adr,
  pages =        "xv + 329",
  year =         "2001",
  ISBN =         "0-201-61638-6 (paperback)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-201-61638-5 (paperback)",
  LCCN =         "QA76.73.S67 B695 2001",
  bibdate =      "Wed Feb 28 09:38:10 2001",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sqlbooks.bib",
  note =         "Includes CD-ROM.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  libnote =      "Not in my library.",
  tableofcontents = "List of Tables / xi \\
                 List of Figures / xiii \\
                 Acknowledgments / xv \\
                 1: Introduction \\
                 In This Chapter / 1 \\
                 Why This Book? / 1 \\
                 Use, not Feature / 2 \\
                 Lots of Examples / 2 \\
                 Multiple Systems / 2 \\
                 Legacy / 3 \\
                 Tuning / 3 \\
                 Who This Book Is For / 4 \\
                 Contents / 4 \\
                 Chapters / 4 \\
                 Appendices / 6 \\
                 Speaking Multiple SQLs / 6 \\
                 SQL Engines / 7 \\
                 SQL Dialects / 8 \\
                 Following Conventions / 8 \\
                 Text / 8 \\
                 Code / 9 \\
                 Understanding the msdpn Database / 11 \\
                 Table Details / 13 \\
                 Using the Examples / 17 \\
                 Summary / 17 \\
                 2: Handling Dirty Data / 19 \\
                 Case / 20 \\
                 Sort Order / 20 \\
                 UPPER and LOWER in Searches / 23 \\
                 UPPER and LOWER in UPDATE / 25 \\
                 UPPER and LOWER with Dates / 26 \\
                 INITCAP / 27 \\
                 Space / 28 \\
                 Removing Spaces / 31 \\
                 Additional Features / 32 \\
                 Size / 34 \\
                 Actual Size / 34 \\
                 Defined Size / 36 \\
                 Matching Patterns / 37 \\
                 Quoting Wildcards with ESCAPE / 38 \\
                 LIKE Variants / 38 \\
                 Datatypes and LIKE / 40 \\
                 Locating Patterns / 41 \\
                 How LOCATE Works / 42 \\
                 Using LOCATE Functions / 43 \\
                 Sounds Like / 46 \\
                 BETWEEN / 49 \\
                 Dealing with Dates / 50 \\
                 Converting Dates (and Other Datatypes) / 50 \\
                 Doing Math on Dates / 51 \\
                 Finding Dates / 54 \\
                 3: Translating Values / 63 \\
                 Why Translate? / 63 \\
                 Case/Decode / 64 \\
                 Case/Decode Variations / 69 \\
                 Handling NULL / 71 \\
                 Coalesce/Isnull/Nvl / 71 \\
                 Finding the First Non-NULL: COALESCE / 73 \\
                 Nullif / 74 \\
                 Point Functions / 77 \\
                 Getting CASE Effects from Functions and Column Values /
                 77 \\
                 Getting CASE Effects from Multiple Functions / 78 \\
                 Union / 84 \\
                 How UNION Works / 84 \\
                 UNION and NULL / 86 \\
                 UNION Problems? / 87 \\
                 Joins and Outer Joins / 88 \\
                 Joins and NULL Values / 90 \\
                 Outer Joins / 91 \\
                 Subqueries / 96 \\
                 Subqueries and Displays / 96 \\
                 Embedded Correlated Subqueries / 96 \\
                 Correlated and Noncorrelated Subqueries / 98 \\
                 TRANSLATE: Another Conditional Expression / 99 \\
                 4: Managing Multiples / 105 \\
                 What's the Issue with Multiples? / 105 \\
                 Capturing Duplicates / 106 \\
                 Duplicates and a Holding Table / 106 \\
                 Using ROWID to Remove Duplicates / 112 \\
                 Finding Near-Duplicates / 114 \\
                 Self-Join / 115 \\
                 Unequal Joins / 117 \\
                 Similar / 124 \\
                 Locating Disconnected Rows / 125 \\
                 Using Outer Joins / 126 \\
                 Using NOT IN Subqueries / 132 \\
                 Using MINUS / 134 \\
                 Counting Items Based on Characteristics / 137 \\
                 Grouping By a Subset / 137 \\
                 Locating the Critical Element / 140 \\
                 Groups and Outer Joins / 145 \\
                 Figuring Distribution / 146 \\
                 Checking Detail Against Master / 146 \\
                 Two Products Together? / 150 \\
                 Restore ordermaster / 152 \\
                 Having / 153 \\
                 5: Navigating Numbers / 157 \\
                 What's in a Number? / 157 \\
                 Comparing Autonumbering Systems / 158 \\
                 ASA: Default / 158 \\
                 Transact-SQL: Column Property / 159 \\
                 Oracle: CREATE SEQUENCE / 161 \\
                 Informix: SERIAL Datatype / 162 \\
                 Associated Issues / 162 \\
                 Locating the High Value / 163 \\
                 Group by, Count, Having Max(Count) / 163 \\
                 FROM Subquery / 165 \\
                 Row Counts of Various Sorts / 167 \\
                 Creating Row Numbers / 169 \\
                 System Numbers / 169 \\
                 Your Numbers / 174 \\
                 Finding the Top N: Six Approaches / 178 \\
                 Row Limits and ORDER BY / 179 \\
                 Row Numbers and HAVING / 179 \\
                 Subquery / 183 \\
                 Nested Subqueries / 184 \\
                 Aggregates and Many Copies / 186 \\
                 Cursors / 187 \\
                 Picking Every Nth / 189 \\
                 What Modulo Is / 190 \\
                 Modulo in WHERE and HAVING / 192 \\
                 Back to Nth Row / 194 \\
                 Correlated Subquery / 195 \\
                 Generating a Running Total / 196 \\
                 6: Tuning Queries / 203 \\
                 Understanding the Optimizer and Associated Tools / 206
                 \\
                 Getting Information on Indexes / 206 \\
                 Checking the Optimizer / 210 \\
                 SQL Conventions / 213 \\
                 Managing the WHERE Clause / 214 \\
                 Why a Table Scan? / 214 \\
                 Data Distribution Statistics / 214 \\
                 Disabling an Index with a Bad Where / 215 \\
                 Comparing Columns in the Same Table / 215 \\
                 Using Nonselective Indexes / 216 \\
                 Doing Math on a Column / 217 \\
                 Using Functions / 218 \\
                 Finding Ranges with BETWEEN / 219 \\
                 Matching with LIKE / 220 \\
                 Comparing to NULL / 221 \\
                 Negating with NOT / 222 \\
                 Converting Values / 223 \\
                 Using OR / 223 \\
                 Finding Sets of Values with IN / 224 \\
                 Using Multicolumn Indexes / 225 \\
                 Creating Covering Indexes / 225 \\
                 Joining Columns / 228 \\
                 Sorting with DISTINCT and UNION / 230 \\
                 Distinct / 230 \\
                 Union / 231 \\
                 Where / 233 \\
                 Choosing Between HAVING and WHERE / 234 \\
                 Looking at7 Views / 235 \\
                 Forcing Indexes / 238 \\
                 Asking Performance Questions / 239 \\
                 7: Using SQL to Write SQL / 241 \\
                 Systematically Speaking / 241 \\
                 Getting Meta-Data from System Catalogs / 242 \\
                 Listing System Catalogs / 242 \\
                 Writing Queries Using System Catalogs / 250 \\
                 Using System Functions / 251 \\
                 Getting Administrative Information / 252 \\
                 Finding Today's Date / 255 \\
                 Inserting Today's Date / 257 \\
                 Writing SQL with SQL / 259 \\
                 GRANTing Permissions / 259 \\
                 Removing Junk Objects / 261 \\
                 Creating Test Data with SQL / 263 \\
                 Appendix A: Understanding the Sample DB: msdpn / 267
                 \\
                 MegaSysDataProNet Co / 267 \\
                 Collecting the CREATE Scripts / 268 \\
                 Adaptive Server Anywhere / 269 \\
                 Sybase Adaptive Server Enterprise / 272 \\
                 Microsoft SQL Server / 274 \\
                 Oracle / 274 \\
                 Informix / 276 \\
                 Explaining the INSERT Scripts / 278 \\
                 INSERT INTO customer / 278 \\
                 INSERT INTO supplier / 280 \\
                 INSERT INTO product / 281 \\
                 INSERT INTO employee / 284 \\
                 INSERT INTO ordermaster / 284 \\
                 INSERT INTO orderdetail / 286 \\
                 Experimenting and Transaction Management / 288 \\
                 Removing Data and Objects: DROP and DELETE Commands /
                 292 \\
                 Remove Database / 292 \\
                 DROP Commands / 292 \\
                 DELETE FROM Command / 293 \\
                 Appendix B: Comparing Datatypes and Functions / 295 \\
                 Comparatively Speaking / 295 \\
                 Datatype Comparison / 295 \\
                 Function Comparison / 297 \\
                 Character (String) Functions / 297 \\
                 Number Functions / 299 \\
                 Date Functions / 300 \\
                 Conditional Functions / 301 \\
                 Sequential Number Methods / 302 \\
                 Row Number and Row ID Methods / 302 \\
                 Tuning Functions / 302 \\
                 System Functions / 303 \\
                 Join Syntax Comparison / 304 \\
                 Notes on Environment and Display / 305 \\
                 Setting Number Formats / 305 \\
                 Defining Display Precision / 309 \\
                 Defining Default Date Format / 310 \\
                 General / 313 \\
                 Informix / 314 \\
                 Microsoft SQL Server / 314 \\
                 mSQL/MySQL / 314 \\
                 Oracle / 314 \\
                 Sybase / 315 \\
                 Transact-SQL / 315 \\
                 Other Offerings / 316 \\
                 Newsgroups / 316 \\
                 Index / 317",
}

@Book{Box:2003:ENC,
  author =       "Don Box and Chris Sells",
  title =        "Essential {.NET}: Volume 1: {The Common Language
                 Runtime}",
  publisher =    pub-AW,
  address =      pub-AW:adr,
  pages =        "xxiii + 405",
  year =         "2003",
  ISBN =         "0-201-73411-7 (paperback)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-201-73411-9 (paperback)",
  LCCN =         "QA76.76.M52 B69 2003",
  bibdate =      "Wed Mar 15 08:57:34 MST 2006",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 z3950.loc.gov:7090/Voyager",
  note =         "Foreword by James S. Miller",
  series =       "Microsoft .NET development series",
  abstract =     "Book Review: {Essential .NET} will enable developers
                 to take advantage of the full power available to them
                 in Microsoft .NET. This book explains the ``why''
                 behind C\#, .NET, and the CLR. As with all of Don's
                 books, it is packed with practical detail and expert
                 advice.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  subject =      "Microsoft .NET; Component software; Programming
                 languages (Electronic computers)",
  tableofcontents = "1: The CLR as a Better COM \\
                 2: Components \\
                 3: Type Basics \\
                 4: Programming with Type \\
                 5: Instances \\
                 6: Methods \\
                 7: Advanced Methods \\
                 8: Domains \\
                 9: Security \\
                 10: CLR Externals",
}

@Book{Boyce:1996:IW,
  author =       "Jim Boyce and Paul J. Sanna and Rob Tidrow and William
                 Steen and Jonathan J. Chau and Scott Fuller and Kevin
                 Pagan and Russell Jacobs and R. James Ruehlin",
  title =        "Inside Windows 95: Deluxe Edition",
  publisher =    pub-NRP,
  address =      pub-NRP:adr,
  pages =        "xxx + 1228",
  year =         "1996",
  ISBN =         "1-56205-695-6",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-1-56205-695-7",
  LCCN =         "QA76.76.O63 B685 1996",
  bibdate =      "Fri Aug 21 12:58:39 1998",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  note =         "Includes CD-ROM.",
  price =        "US\$59.99, CAN\$84.95",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Article{Boyer:string-search,
  author =       "R. S. Boyer and J. S. Moore",
  title =        "A fast string searching algorithm",
  journal =      j-CACM,
  volume =       "20",
  number =       "10",
  pages =        "762--772",
  month =        oct,
  year =         "1977",
  bibdate =      "Sun May 2 07:45:54 1999",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  note =         "See also
                 \cite{Knuth:string-search,Sunday:string-search,Baeza-Yates:j-CACM-35-10-74}.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Bradley:1984:ALP,
  author =       "David J. Bradley",
  title =        "Assembly Language Programming for the {IBM} Personal
                 Computer",
  publisher =    pub-PH,
  address =      pub-PH:adr,
  pages =        "xii + 340",
  year =         "1984",
  ISBN =         "0-13-049189-6",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-13-049189-3",
  LCCN =         "QA76.8.I2594 B7 1984",
  bibdate =      "Sun May 02 07:46:15 1999",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  note =         "The author is one of the designers of the IBM PC. The
                 book covers the 8088 and 8087 instruction sets, DOS and
                 MASM, the IBM PC hardware, and the ROM BIOS. Somewhat
                 more technical than \cite{Lafore:1984:ALP}. See also
                 \cite{Scanlon:1984:ALP}.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Brainerd:1990:PGF,
  author =       "Walter S. Brainerd and Charles H. Goldberg and Jeanne
                 C. Adams",
  title =        "Programmer's Guide to {Fortran 90}",
  publisher =    pub-MCGRAW-HILL,
  address =      pub-MCGRAW-HILL:adr,
  pages =        "vii + 410",
  year =         "1990",
  ISBN =         "0-07-000248-7",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-07-000248-7",
  LCCN =         "QA76.73.F25 B735 1990",
  bibdate =      "Sun May 02 07:46:24 1999",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/bibnet/subjects/acc-stab-num-alg.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/fortran3.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  note =         "See \cite{ANSI:ftn92}.",
  price =        "US\$37.95",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  keywords =     "Fortran 90 (computer program language); Programming
                 languages; {Fortran 90} (Computer program language)",
  libnote =      "Not yet in my library.",
}

@Book{Brand:1960:MSP,
  author =       "J. C. D. (John Charles Drury) Brand and J. C. (James
                 Clare) Speakman",
  title =        "Molecular Structure: The Physical Approach",
  publisher =    "Edward Arnold (Publishers) Ltd.",
  address =      "London, England",
  pages =        "viii + 312",
  year =         "1960",
  LCCN =         "QD501.B786 1964",
  bibdate =      "Sat Jul 25 13:55:27 1998",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  xxISBN =       "none",
}

@Book{Braswell:1989:IP,
  author =       "Frank Merritt Braswell",
  title =        "Inside {PostScript}",
  publisher =    pub-PEACHPIT,
  address =      pub-PEACHPIT:adr,
  year =         "1989",
  ISBN =         "0-938151-10-X",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-938151-10-4",
  LCCN =         "QA76.73.P67 B73 1989",
  bibdate =      "Sat Aug 27 10:56:22 1994",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  price =        "US\$37.50",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Brent:2011:MCA,
  author =       "Richard P. Brent and Paul Zimmermann",
  title =        "Modern Computer Arithmetic",
  volume =       "18",
  publisher =    pub-CAMBRIDGE,
  address =      pub-CAMBRIDGE:adr,
  pages =        "xvi + 221",
  year =         "2011",
  ISBN =         "0-521-19469-5 (hardcover)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-521-19469-3 (hardcover)",
  LCCN =         "QA76.9.C62 BRE 2011",
  bibdate =      "Sat Jan 15 12:25:22 MST 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/fparith.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sigact.bib;
                 library.ox.ac.uk:210/ADVANCE",
  series =       "Cambridge monographs on applied and computational
                 mathematics",
  URL =          "http://www.loria.fr/~zimmerma/mca/pub226.html",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  subject =      "Computer arithmetic",
  tableofcontents = "Preface / ix \\
                 Acknowledgements / xi \\
                 Notation / xiii \\
                 Integer arithmetic / 1 \\
                 1.1 Representation and notations / 1 \\
                 1.2 Addition and subtraction / 2 \\
                 1.3 Multiplication / J \\
                 i.3.1 Naive multiplication / 4 \\
                 1.3.2 Karatsuba's algorithm / 5 \\
                 1.3.3 Toom--Cook multiplication / 6 \\
                 1.3.4 Use of the fast Fourier transform (FFT) / 8 \\
                 1.3.5 Unbalanced multiplication / 8 \\
                 1.3.6 Squaring / 11 \\
                 1.3.7 Multiplication by a constant / 13 \\
                 1.4 Division / 14 \\
                 1.4.1 Naive division / 14 \\
                 1.4.2 Divisor preconditioning / 16 \\
                 1.4.3 Divide and conquer division / 18 \\
                 1.4.4 Newton's method / 21 \\
                 1.4.5 Exact division / 21 \\
                 1.4.6 Only quotient or remainder wanted / 22 \\
                 1.4.7 Division by a single word / 23 \\
                 1.4.8 Hensel's division / 24 \\
                 1.5 Roots / 25 \\
                 1.5.1 Square root / 25 \\
                 1.5.2 $k$th root / 27 \\
                 1.5.3 Exact root / 28 \\
                 1.6 Greatest common divisor / 29 \\
                 1.6.1 Naive GCD / 29 \\
                 1.6.2 Extended GCD / 32 \\
                 1.6.3 Half binary GCD, divide and conquer GCD / 33 \\
                 1.7 Base conversion / 37 \\
                 1.7.1 Quadratic algorithms / 37 \\
                 1.7.2 Subquadratic algorithms / 38 \\
                 1.8 Exercises / 39 \\
                 1.9 Notes and references / 44 \\
                 Modular arithmetic and the FFT / 47 \\
                 2.1 Representation / 47 \\
                 2.1.1 Classical representation / 47 \\
                 2.1.2 Montgomery's form / 48 \\
                 2.1.3 Residue number systems / 48 \\
                 2.1.4 MSB vs LSB algorithms / 49 \\
                 2.1.5 Link with Polynomials / 49 \\
                 2.2 Modular addition and subtraction / 50 \\
                 2.3 The Fourier transform / 50 \\
                 2.3.1 Theoretical setting / 50 \\
                 2.3.2 The fast Fourier transform / 51 \\
                 2.3.3 The Sch{\"o}nhage--Strassen algorithm / 55 \\
                 2.4 Modular multiplication / 58 \\
                 2.4.1 Barrett's algorithm / 58 \\
                 2.4.2 Montgomery's multiplication / 60 \\
                 2.4.3 McLaughlin's algorithm / 63 \\
                 2.4.4 Special moduli / 65 \\
                 2.5 Modular division and inversion / 65 \\
                 2.5.1 Several inversions at once / 61 \\
                 2.6 Modular exponentiation / 68 \\
                 2.6.1 Binary exponentiation / 70 \\
                 2.6.2 Exponentiation with a larger base / 70 \\
                 2.6.3 Sliding window and redundant representation / 72
                 \\
                 2.7 Chinese remainder theorem / 75 \\
                 2.8 Exercises / 75 \\
                 2.9 Notes and references / 77 \\
                 Floating-point arithmetic / 79 \\
                 3.1 Representation / 79 \\
                 3.1.1 Radix choice / 80 \\
                 3.1.2 Exponent range / 81 \\
                 3.1.3 Special values / 82 \\
                 3.1.4 Subnormal numbers / 82 \\
                 3.1.5 Encoding / 83 \\
                 3.1.6 Precision: local, global, operation, operand / 84
                 \\
                 3.1.7 Link to integers / 86 \\
                 3.1.8 Ziv's algorithm and error analysis / 86 \\
                 3.1.9 Rounding / 87 \\
                 3.1.10 Strategies / 90 \\
                 3.2 Addition, subtraction, comparison / 91 \\
                 3.2.1 Floating-point addition / 92 \\
                 3.2.2 Floating-point subtraction / 93 \\
                 3.3 Multiplication / 95 \\
                 3.3.1 Integer multiplication via complex FFT / 98 \\
                 3.3.2 The middle product / 99 \\
                 3.4 Reciprocal and division / 101 \\
                 3.4.1 Reciprocal / 102 \\
                 3.4.2 Division / 106 \\
                 3.5 Square root / 111 \\
                 3.5.1 Reciprocal square root / 112 \\
                 3.6 Conversion / 114 \\
                 3.6.1 Floating-point output / 115 \\
                 3.6.2 Floating-point input / 117 \\
                 3.7 Exercises / 118 \\
                 3.8 Notes and references / 120 \\
                 Elementary and special function evaluation / 125 \\
                 4.1 Introduction / 125 \\
                 4.2 Newton's method / 126 \\
                 4.2.1 Newton's method for inverse roots / 127 \\
                 4.2.2 Newton's method for reciprocals / 128 \\
                 4.2.3 Newton's method for (reciprocal) square roots /
                 129 \\
                 4.2.4 Newton's method for formal power series / 129 \\
                 4.2.5 Newton's method for functional inverses / 130 \\
                 4.2.6 Higher-order Newton-like methods / 131 \\
                 4.3 Argument reduction / 132 \\
                 4.3.1 Repeated use of a doubling formula / 134 \\
                 4.3.2 Loss of precision / 134 \\
                 4.3.3 Guard digits / 135 \\
                 4.3.4 Doubling versus tripling / 136 \\
                 4.4 Power series / 136 \\
                 4.4.1 Direct power series evaluation / 140 \\
                 4.4.2 Power series with argument reduction / 140 \\
                 4.4.3 Rectangular series splitting / 141 \\
                 4.5 Asymptotic expansions / 144 \\
                 4.6 Continued fractions / 150 \\
                 4.7 Recurrence relations / 152 \\
                 4.7.1 Evaluation of Bessel functions / 153 \\
                 4.7.2 Evaluation of Bernoulli and tangent numbers / 154
                 \\
                 4.8 Arithmetic--geometric mean / 158 \\
                 4.8.1 Elliptic integrals / 158 \\
                 4.8.2 First AGM algorithm for the logarithm / 159 \\
                 4.8.3 Theta functions / 160 \\
                 4.8.4 Second AGM algorithm for the logarithm / 162 \\
                 4.8.5 The complex AGM / 163 \\
                 4.9 Binary splitting / 163 \\
                 4.9.1 A binary splitting algorithm for sin, cos / 166
                 \\
                 4.9.2 The bit-burst algorithm / 161 \\
                 4.10 Contour integration / 169 \\
                 4.11 Exercises / 171 \\
                 4.12 Notes and references / 179 \\
                 Implementations and pointers / 185 \\
                 5.1 Software tools / 185 \\
                 5.1.1 CLN / 185 \\
                 5.1.2 GNUMP (GMP) / 185 \\
                 5.1.3 MPFQ / 186 \\
                 5.1.4 GNU MPFR / 187 \\
                 5.1.5 Other multiple-precision packages / 187 \\
                 5.1.6 Computational algebra packages / 188 \\
                 5.2 Mailing lists / 189 \\
                 5.2.1 The GMP lists / 189 \\
                 5.2.2 The MPFR list / 190 \\
                 5.3 Online documents / 190 \\
                 References / 191 \\
                 Index / 207",
}

@Book{Breshears:2009:AC,
  author =       "Clay Breshears",
  title =        "The Art of Concurrency",
  publisher =    pub-ORA,
  address =      pub-ORA:adr,
  pages =        "xiii + 285",
  year =         "2009",
  ISBN =         "0-596-80242-0",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-596-80242-4",
  LCCN =         "QA76.642 .B74 2009; Internet",
  bibdate =      "Mon Apr 5 18:12:38 MDT 2010",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 melvyl.cdlib.org:210/CDL90",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  libnote =      "Not yet in my library.",
  subject =      "parallel programming (computer science); computer
                 programming",
}

@Book{Brewster:2010:MLW,
  author =       "David Brewster",
  title =        "Memoirs of the life, writings, and discoveries of {Sir
                 Isaac Newton}",
  publisher =    pub-CAMBRIDGE,
  address =      pub-CAMBRIDGE:adr,
  pages =        "xxi + 430 (vol. 1), xi + 434 (vol. 2)",
  year =         "2010",
  DOI =          "https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511792670",
  ISBN =         "1-108-02556-0 (vol. 1), 1-108-02557-9 (vol. 2),
                 1-108-02558-7 (set)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-1-108-02556-0 (vol. 1), 978-1-108-02557-7 (vol.
                 2), 978-1-108-02558-4 (set)",
  LCCN =         "QC16.N7 B8 1855",
  bibdate =      "Wed Sep 2 08:25:26 MDT 2015",
  bibsource =    "fsz3950.oclc.org:210/WorldCat;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  series =       "Cambridge library collection",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  author-dates = "1781--1868",
  libnote =      "Not in my library.",
  remark =       "This edition first published 1855. This digitally
                 printed version 2010.",
  subject =      "Newton, Isaac; Newton, Isaac",
  subject-dates = "1642--1727",
}

@Book{BrinchHansen:1985:BHP,
  author =       "Per {Brinch Hansen}",
  title =        "Brinch Hansen on Pascal Compilers",
  publisher =    pub-PH,
  address =      pub-PH:adr,
  pages =        "x + 310",
  year =         "1985",
  ISBN =         "0-13-083098-4",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-13-083098-2",
  LCCN =         "QA76.73.P2 B75 1985",
  bibdate =      "Tue Dec 14 22:42:51 1993",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  price =        "US\$25.00",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Brockman:2006:MEE,
  editor =       "John Brockman",
  title =        "My {Einstein}: essays by twenty-four of the world's
                 leading thinkers on the man, his work, and his legacy",
  publisher =    pub-PANTHEON,
  address =      pub-PANTHEON:adr,
  pages =        "xvi + 261",
  year =         "2006",
  ISBN =         "0-375-42345-1",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-375-42345-1",
  LCCN =         "QC16.E5 M9 2006",
  bibdate =      "Thu Jan 25 18:34:18 2007",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/einstein.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 z3950.loc.gov:7090/Voyager",
  URL =          "http://www.loc.gov/catdir/enhancements/fy0643/2005048286-b.html;
                 http://www.loc.gov/catdir/enhancements/fy0643/2005048286-d.html;
                 http://www.loc.gov/catdir/enhancements/fy0643/2005048286-s.html;
                 http://www.loc.gov/catdir/enhancements/fy0661/2005048286-t.html",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  subject =      "Einstein, Albert; Anniversaries, etc; Physicists;
                 Germany; Biography; United States; Jewish scientists",
  subject-dates = "1879--1955",
  tableofcontents = "Einstein when he's at home / Roger Highfield \\
                 The freest man / Gino C. Segr{\`e} \\
                 Mentor and sounding board / John Archibald Wheeler \\
                 My Einstein suspenders / George F. Smoot \\
                 Einstein, Moe, and Joe / Leon M. Lederman \\
                 The true and the absurd / Charles Seife \\
                 Albert Einstein: a scientific reactionary / Frank J.
                 Tipler \\
                 Helen Dukas: Einstein's compass / George Dyson \\
                 My three Einsteins / Corey S. Powell \\
                 In search of Einstein / Lee Smolin \\
                 Einstein and absolute reality / Anton Zeilinger \\
                 A walk down Mercer Street / Steven Strogatz \\
                 Things and thoughts / Peter Galison \\
                 Childe Bernstein to relativity came / Jeremy Bernstein
                 \\
                 The books in the basement / George Johnson \\
                 How he thought / Leonard Suskind \\
                 Toward a moving train / Janna Levin \\
                 Einstein's tie / Marcelo Gleiser \\
                 The greatest discovery Einstein didn't make / Rocky
                 Kolb \\
                 The gift of time / Richard A. Muller \\
                 Flying apart / Paul C. W. Davies \\
                 Einstein in the Twilight Zone / Lawrence M. Krauss \\
                 No beginning and no end / Paul J. Steinhardt \\
                 Where is Einstein? / Maria Spiropulu",
}

@Book{Bronshtein:2007:HM,
  editor =       "I. N. (Il{\i}a Nikolaevich) Bronshte{\u\i}n and A.
                 Semendyayev and Gerhard Musiol and Heiner M{\"u}hlig",
  title =        "Handbook of mathematics",
  publisher =    pub-SV,
  address =      pub-SV:adr,
  edition =      "Fifth",
  pages =        "xliii + 1159",
  year =         "2007",
  ISBN =         "3-540-72121-5",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-3-540-72121-5",
  LCCN =         "QA40 HAN 2007; QA40 .S6813 2007",
  bibdate =      "Sat May 15 09:30:45 MDT 2010",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 library.ox.ac.uk:210/ADVANCE",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  libnote =      "Not in my library.",
  remark =       "Original Russian title: Spravochnik po matematike.
                 Based on the 6th German edition published by
                 Wissenschaftlicher Verlag Harri Deutsche GmbH,
                 Frankfurt am Main under title: Taschenbuch der
                 Mathematik.",
  subject =      "mathematics; handbooks, manuals, etc",
  tableofcontents = "1. Arithmetic \\
                 2. Functions \\
                 3. Geometry \\
                 4. Linear Algebra \\
                 5. Algebra and Discrete Mathematics \\
                 6. Differentiation \\
                 7. Infinite Series \\
                 8. Integral Calculus \\
                 9. Differential Equations \\
                 10. Calculus of Variations \\
                 11. Linear Integral Equations \\
                 12. Functional Analysis \\
                 13. Vector Analysis and Vector Fields \\
                 14. Function Theory \\
                 15. Integral Transformations \\
                 16. Probability Theory and Mathematical Statistics \\
                 17. Dynamical Systems and Chaos \\
                 18. Optimization \\
                 19. Numerical Analysis \\
                 20. Computer Algebra Systems \\
                 21. Tables",
}

@Book{Brooks:1982:MMM,
  author =       "Frederick P. {Brooks, Jr.}",
  title =        "The Mythical Man-Month: Essays on Software
                 Engineering",
  publisher =    pub-AW,
  address =      pub-AW:adr,
  pages =        "xi + 195",
  year =         "1982",
  ISBN =         "0-201-00650-2",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-201-00650-6",
  LCCN =         "QA 76.6 B75 1982",
  bibdate =      "Wed Jan 12 14:30:25 1994",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  abstract =     "In the essays, the author blends on software
                 engineering with his own personal opinions and the
                 opinions of others involved in building complex
                 computer systems. He not only gives the reader the
                 benefit of the lessons he has learned from the OS. 360
                 experience, but he writes about them in an extremely
                 readable and entertaining way.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  tableofcontents = "1: The Tar Pit \\
                 2: The Mythical Man-Month \\
                 3: The Surgical Team \\
                 4: Aristocracy, Democracy, and System Design \\
                 5: The Second-System Effect \\
                 6: Passing the Word \\
                 7: Why Did the Tower of Babel Fail? \\
                 8: Calling the Shot \\
                 9: Ten Pounds in a Five-Pound Sack \\
                 10: The Documentary Hypothesis \\
                 11: Plan to Throw One Away \\
                 12: Sharp Tools \\
                 13: The Whole and the Parts \\
                 14: Hatching a Catastrophe \\
                 15: The Other Face \\
                 16: No Silver Bullet: Essence and Accident \\
                 17: ``No Silver Bullet'' ReFired \\
                 18: Propositions of The Mythical Man-Month: True or
                 False? \\
                 19: The Mythical Man-Month After 20 Years \\
                 Epilogue",
}

@Book{Brooks:1985:PCL,
  author =       "Rodney A. Brooks",
  title =        "Programming in {Common Lisp}",
  publisher =    pub-WILEY,
  address =      pub-WILEY:adr,
  pages =        "xv + 303",
  year =         "1985",
  ISBN =         "0-471-81888-7",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-471-81888-5",
  LCCN =         "QA76.73.L23 B76 1985",
  bibdate =      "Tue Dec 14 22:43:03 1993",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  price =        "US\$18.95",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Brooks:1995:MMM,
  author =       "Frederick P. {Brooks, Jr.}",
  title =        "The Mythical Man-Month --- Essays on Software
                 Engineering",
  publisher =    pub-AW,
  address =      pub-AW:adr,
  edition =      "Anniversary",
  pages =        "xiii + 322",
  year =         "1995",
  ISBN =         "0-201-83595-9",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-201-83595-3",
  LCCN =         "QA76.758 .B75 1995",
  bibdate =      "Tue Mar 04 11:46:00 1997",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  price =        "US\$26.76",
  abstract =     "Few book on software project management have bees as
                 influential and timeless as this. With a blend of
                 software engineering facts and thought-provoking
                 opinions, Fred Brooks offers insight for anyone
                 managing complex projects. These essays draw from his
                 experience as project manager for the IBM system/360
                 computer family and then for OS/360, its massive
                 software system. now, 20 years after the initial
                 publication of his book, Brooks has revisited his
                 original ideas and added new thoughts and advice, both
                 for readers already familiar with his work and for
                 readers discovering it for the first time.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  tableofcontents = "The tar pit \\
                 The mythical man-month \\
                 The surgical team \\
                 Aristocracy, democracy, and system design \\
                 The second-system effect \\
                 Passing the word \\
                 Why did the Tower of Babel fail? \\
                 Calling the shot \\
                 Ten pounds in a five-pound sack \\
                 The documentary hypothesis \\
                 Plan to throw one away \\
                 Sharp tools \\
                 The whole and the parts \\
                 Hatching a catastrophe \\
                 The other face \\
                 No silver bulled--essence and accident \\
                 ``No silver bullet'' refired \\
                 Propositions of The Mythical Man-Month: true or false?
                 \\
                 The Mythical Man-Month after 20 years",
}

@Book{Brown:1977:SPA,
  editor =       "P. J. Brown",
  title =        "Software Portability: An Advanced Course",
  publisher =    pub-CAMBRIDGE,
  address =      pub-CAMBRIDGE:adr,
  pages =        "xiv + 328",
  year =         "1977",
  ISBN =         "0-521-21485-8",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-521-21485-8",
  LCCN =         "QA76.6 .S6351",
  bibdate =      "Tue Dec 14 22:43:05 1993",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  price =        "US\$14.00",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Brown:1985:UP,
  author =       "Maxine Brown",
  title =        "Understanding {PHIGS}",
  publisher =    pub-MEGATEK,
  address =      pub-MEGATEK:adr,
  year =         "1985",
  LCCN =         "T385 .B761 1985",
  bibdate =      "Wed Dec 15 15:35:57 1993",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  xxISBN =       "none",
}

@Book{Brown:1994:PTT,
  editor =       "Vicki Brown",
  title =        "Prime Time {\TeX}cetera",
  publisher =    pub-PRIME-TIME-FREEWARE,
  address =      pub-PRIME-TIME-FREEWARE:adr,
  pages =        "96",
  year =         "1994",
  ISBN =         "1-881957-10-1",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-1-881957-10-2",
  bibdate =      "Wed Aug 10 10:52:33 1994",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  note =         "Includes CD-ROM.",
  price =        "US\$60.00",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Brown:2010:HKP,
  author =       "Mike Brown",
  title =        "How {I} killed {Pluto} and why it had it coming",
  publisher =    "Spiegel and Grau",
  address =      "New York, NY, USA",
  pages =        "xiii + 267",
  year =         "2010",
  ISBN =         "0-385-53108-7",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-385-53108-5",
  LCCN =         "QB701 .B77 2010",
  bibdate =      "Mon Jun 13 16:37:11 MDT 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 z3950.loc.gov:7090/Voyager",
  abstract =     "The astronomer who inadvertently triggered the
                 ``demotion'' of Pluto in his effort to officially
                 recognize the solar system's tenth planet describes the
                 ensuing debates and public outcry while revealing the
                 behind-the-scenes story of his discovery.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  subject =      "Pluto (Dwarf planet); Planets; Solar system;
                 Discoveries in science; Anecdotes; Eris (Dwarf
                 planet)",
  tableofcontents = "Prologue: Pluto dies \\
                 What is a planet? \\
                 A millennium of planets \\
                 The moon is my nemesis \\
                 The second-best thing \\
                 An icy nail \\
                 The end of the solar system \\
                 Raining = pouring \\
                 Lilah, an intermission \\
                 The tenth planet \\
                 Stealing the show \\
                 Planet or not \\
                 Mean very evil men \\
                 Discord and strife",
}

@Book{Browne:2015:SEC,
  author =       "John Browne",
  title =        "Seven Elements That Changed the World: An Adventure of
                 Ingenuity and Discovery",
  publisher =    "Pegasus Books",
  address =      "New York, NY, USA",
  pages =        "xix + 279",
  year =         "2015",
  ISBN =         "1-60598-691-7",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-1-60598-691-3",
  LCCN =         "????",
  bibdate =      "Wed Apr 1 17:09:06 MDT 2015",
  bibsource =    "fsz3950.oclc.org:210/WorldCat;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  tableofcontents = "Preface / ix \\
                 The Essence of Everything / xi \\
                 Iron / 1 \\
                 Carbon / 29 \\
                 Gold / 85 \\
                 Silver / 105 \\
                 Uranium / 124 \\
                 Titanium / 149 \\
                 Silicon / 161 \\
                 Power, Progress and Destruction / 194 \\
                 Acknowledgements / 201 \\
                 List of Maps / 203 \\
                 List of Illustrations / 204 \\
                 Notes / 210 \\
                 Bibliography / 255 \\
                 Index / 267",
}

@Book{Bryan:1988:SAG,
  author =       "Martin Bryan",
  title =        "{SGML}: An Author's Guide to the {Standard Generalized
                 Markup Language}",
  publisher =    pub-AW,
  address =      pub-AW:adr,
  pages =        "xvii + 364",
  year =         "1988",
  ISBN =         "0-201-17535-5",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-201-17535-6",
  LCCN =         "QA76.73.S44 B79 1988",
  bibdate =      "Thu Jun 23 16:34:54 1994",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/sgml.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/standard.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/texbook3.bib",
  price =        "UK\pounds16.95",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  keywords =     "document representation; DTD; SGML (computer program
                 language)",
  remark =       "Complete description of SGML including example DTDs.",
  tableofcontents = "Background to SGML \\
                 SGML Documents \\
                 The Reference Concrete Syntax \\
                 Entity Declaration and Use \\
                 Declaring and Using SGML Elements \\
                 Attributes \\
                 Minimization \\
                 Other SGML Declarations \\
                 Multiple Document Structures \\
                 Altering the Concrete Syntax \\
                 The SGML Declaration \\
                 Document Parsing \\
                 Appendixes",
}

@Book{Budd:1998:DSC,
  author =       "Timothy Budd",
  title =        "Data Structures in {C++} Using the {Standard Template
                 Library}",
  publisher =    pub-AW,
  address =      pub-AW:adr,
  pages =        "xxiv + 544",
  year =         "1998",
  ISBN =         "0-201-30879-7",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-201-30879-2",
  LCCN =         "QA76.73.C15B8 1998",
  bibdate =      "Mon Jan 12 14:26:22 1998",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Buerger:1990:LES,
  author =       "David J. Buerger",
  title =        "{\LaTeX} for Engineers and Scientists",
  publisher =    pub-MCGRAW-HILL,
  address =      pub-MCGRAW-HILL:adr,
  pages =        "xvi + 198",
  year =         "1990",
  ISBN =         "0-07-008845-4",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-07-008845-0",
  LCCN =         "Z253.4.L38 B84 1990",
  bibdate =      "Tue Dec 14 22:43:21 1993",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@TechReport{Burks:1946:PDL,
  author =       "Arthur W. Burks and Herman H. Goldstine and John von
                 Neumann",
  title =        "Preliminary discussion of the logical design of an
                 electronic computing instrument",
  institution =  inst-INST-ADV-STUDY,
  address =      inst-INST-ADV-STUDY:adr,
  pages =        "42",
  day =          "28",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "1946",
  bibdate =      "Wed Oct 13 08:17:48 2004",
  bibsource =    "ftp://ftp.math.utah.edu/pub/mirrors/ftp.ira.uka.de/bibliography/Math/computer.arithmetic.bib;
                 ftp://ftp.math.utah.edu/pub/mirrors/ftp.ira.uka.de/bibliography/Math/fparith.bib;
                 ftp://ftp.math.utah.edu/pub/mirrors/ftp.ira.uka.de/bibliography/Theory/arith.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/fparith.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  note =         "Report to the U.S. Army Ordnance Department under
                 contract W-36-034-OKD-7481. Reprinted in
                 \cite[Paper~2]{Taub:1963:JNCa}, \cite{Bell:1971:CSR},
                 \cite[pp.~221--259]{Swartzlander:1976:CDD}, \cite[\S
                 8.3]{Randell:1982:ODC}, and
                 \cite[pp.~97--146]{Aspray:1987:PJN}. Second edition
                 dated 2 September 1947.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  remark =       "Discusses floating-point versus fixed-point
                 computation, and concludes that floating-point is
                 probably not justifiable. They wrote:\par

                 ``There appear to be two major purposes in a `floating'
                 decimal point system both of which arise from the fact
                 that the number of digits in a word is a constant fixed
                 by design considerations for each particular machine.
                 The first of these purposes is to retain in a sum or
                 product as many significant digits as possible and the
                 second of these is to free the human operator from the
                 burden of estimating and inserting into a problem
                 `scale factors' --- multiplicative constants which
                 serve to keep numbers within the limits of the
                 machine.\par

                 There is, of course, no denying the fact that human
                 time is consumed in arranging for the introduction of
                 suitable scale factors. We only argue that the time so
                 consumed is a very small percentage of the total time
                 we will spend in preparing an interesting problem for
                 our machine. The first advantage of the floating point
                 is, we feel, somewhat illusory. In order to have such a
                 floating point, one must waste memory capacity which
                 could otherwise be used for carrying more digits per
                 word. It would therefore seem to us not at all clear
                 whether the modest advantages of a floating binary
                 point offset the loss of memory capacity and the
                 increased complexity of the arithmetic and control
                 circuits.''",
}

@Book{Burrough:1998:DNC,
  author =       "Bryan Burrough",
  title =        "{Dragonfly}: {NASA} and the crisis aboard the {MIR}",
  publisher =    pub-HARPERCOLLINS,
  address =      pub-HARPERCOLLINS:adr,
  pages =        "528",
  year =         "1998",
  ISBN =         "0-88730-783-3",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-88730-783-6",
  LCCN =         "TL867 .B87 1998",
  bibdate =      "Wed May 01 08:04:51 2002",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  abstract =     "In ``Dragonfly'', bestselling author Bryan Burrough
                 tells for the first time the incredible true story of
                 how a joint Russian--American crew narrowly survived
                 almost every trauma an astronaut could imagine: fire,
                 nail-biting spacewalks, and constant mechanical
                 breakdowns, all climaxing in a dramatic midspace
                 collision that left everyone on board scrambling for
                 their lives. Based on hundreds of hours of interviews
                 with the cosmonauts, astronauts, Russian and American
                 ground controllers, psychologists, and scientists
                 involved, ``Dragonfly'' is the saga of a mission as
                 fraught with political and bureaucratic intrigues as
                 any Washington potboiler. Using never-before-released
                 internal NASA memoranda, flight logs, and debriefings,
                 Burrough vividly portrays an American space program in
                 which many astronauts refuse to raise safety concerns
                 for fear they will be frozen out of future missions. It
                 offers an unprecedented look inside the rattletrap
                 Russian space program, where the desperate thirst for
                 hard currency leads to safety shortcuts and exhausted,
                 puppetlike cosmonauts endure truly inhuman pressures
                 from their unfeeling, all-powerful masters on the
                 ground. In ``Dragonfly'', for the first time, the
                 American astronauts who journeyed to Mir speak out
                 bluntly about the failings of the program, from the
                 rigors of training at Russia's Star City military base
                 to the slapdash experiments they were required to
                 perform in space. Yet through it all the men and women
                 of the Russian and American programs persevered,
                 forging friendships that will serve them well as the
                 two countries prepare for the first launches of the
                 International Space Station in late 1998. Theirs is a
                 classic story of a triumph over adversity, destined to
                 be one of the most enduring and widely celebrated
                 adventure stories of our time.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  annote =       "Discusses errors of design, including one where the
                 shuttle rendezvous failed because part of the
                 programming had been done in single-precision
                 arithmetic, and part in double-precision arithmetic.",
  libnote =      "Not yet in my library.",
  tableofcontents = "January 10 to May 18, 1997 \\
                 1992 to 1996 \\
                 May 18 to September 25, 1997 \\
                 Epilogue",
}

@Book{Burton:2007:HMI,
  author =       "David M. Burton",
  title =        "The History of Mathematics: an Introduction",
  publisher =    pub-MCGRAW-HILL,
  address =      pub-MCGRAW-HILL:adr,
  edition =      "Sixth",
  pages =        "xii + 788",
  year =         "2007",
  ISBN =         "0-07-305189-6",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-07-305189-5",
  LCCN =         "QA21 .B96 2007",
  bibdate =      "Fri Sep 6 06:05:08 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 z3950.loc.gov:7090/Voyager",
  URL =          "http://www.loc.gov/catdir/enhancements/fy0625/2005051123-d.html;
                 http://www.loc.gov/catdir/enhancements/fy0625/2005051123-t.html",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  subject =      "Mathematics; History",
  tableofcontents = "Preface \\
                 \\
                 1 Early Number Systems and Symbols \\
                 1.1 Primitive Counting \\
                 A Sense of Number \\
                 Notches as Tally Marks \\
                 The Peruvian Quipus: Knots as Numbers \\
                 1.2 Number Recording of the Egyptians and Greeks \\
                 The History of Herodotus \\
                 Hieroglyphic Representation of Numbers \\
                 Egyptian Hieratic Numeration \\
                 The Greek Alphabetic Numeral System \\
                 1.3 Number Recording of the Babylonians \\
                 Babylonian Cuneiform Script \\
                 Deciphering Cuneiform: Grotefend and Rawlinson \\
                 The Babylonian Positional Number System \\
                 Writing in Ancient China \\
                 \\
                 2 Mathematics in Early Civilizations \\
                 2.1 The Rhind Papyrus \\
                 Egyptian Mathematical Papyri \\
                 A Key To Deciphering: The Rosetta Stone \\
                 2.2 Egyptian Arithmetic \\
                 Early Egyptian Multiplication \\
                 The Unit Fraction Table \\
                 Representing Rational Numbers \\
                 2.3 Four Problems from the Rhind Papyrus \\
                 The Method of False Position \\
                 A Curious Problem \\
                 Egyptian Mathematics as Applied Arithmetic \\
                 2.4 Egyptian Geometry \\
                 Approximating the Area of a Circle \\
                 The Volume of a Truncated Pyramid \\
                 Speculations About the Great Pyramid \\
                 2.5 Babylonian Mathematics \\
                 A Tablet of Reciprocals \\
                 The Babylonian Treatment of Quadratic Equations \\
                 Two Characteristic Babylonian Problems \\
                 2.6 Plimpton \\
                 A Tablet Concerning Number Triples \\
                 Babylonian Use of the Pythagorean Theorem \\
                 The Cairo Mathematical Papyrus \\
                 \\
                 3 The Beginnings of Greek Mathematics \\
                 3.1 The Geometric Discoveries of Thales \\
                 Greece and the Aegean Area \\
                 The Dawn of Demonstrative Geometry: Thales of Miletos
                 \\
                 Measurements Using Geometry \\
                 3.2 Pythagorean Mathematics \\
                 Pythagoras and His Followers \\
                 Nichomachus' Introductio Arithmeticae \\
                 The Theory of Figurative Numbers \\
                 Zeno's Paradox \\
                 3.3 The Pythagorean Problem \\
                 Geometric Proofs of the Pythagorean Theorem \\
                 Early Solutions of the Pythagorean Equation \\
                 The Crisis of Incommensurable Quantities \\
                 Theon's Side and Diagonal Numbers \\
                 Eudoxus of Cnidos \\
                 3.4 Three Construction Problems of Antiquity \\
                 Hippocrates and the Quadrature of the Circle \\
                 The Duplication of the Cube \\
                 The Trisection of an Angle \\
                 3.5 The Quadratrix of Hippias \\
                 Rise of the Sophists \\
                 Hippias of Elis \\
                 The Grove of Academia: Plato's Academy \\
                 \\
                 4 The Alexandrian School: Euclid \\
                 4.1 Euclid and the Elements \\
                 A Center of Learning: The Museum \\
                 Euclid's Life and Writings \\
                 4.2 Euclidean Geometry \\
                 Euclid's Foundation for Geometry \\
                 Book I of the Elements \\
                 Euclid's Proof of the Pythagorean Theorem \\
                 Book II on Geometric Algebra \\
                 Construction of the Regular Pentagon \\
                 4.3 Euclid's Number Theory \\
                 Euclidean Divisibility Properties \\
                 The Algorithm of Euclid \\
                 The Fundamental Theorem of Arithmetic \\
                 An Infinity of Primes \\
                 4.4 Eratosthenes, the Wise Man of Alexandria \\
                 The Sieve of Eratosthenes \\
                 Measurement of the Earth \\
                 The Almagest of Claudius Ptolemy \\
                 Ptolemy's Geographical Dictionary \\
                 4.5 Archimedes \\
                 The Ancient World's Genius \\
                 Estimating the Value of `? \\
                 The Sand-Reckoner \\
                 Quadrature of a Parabolic Segment \\
                 Apollonius of Perga: the Conics \\
                 \\
                 5 The Twilight of Greek Mathematics: Diophantus \\
                 5.1 The Decline of Alexandrian Mathematics \\
                 The Waning of the Golden Age \\
                 The Spread of Christianity \\
                 Constantinople, A Refuge for Greek Learning \\
                 5.2 The Arithmetica \\
                 Diophantus's Number Theory \\
                 Problems from the Arithmetica \\
                 5.3 Diophantine Equations in Greece, India, and China
                 \\
                 The Cattle Problem of Archimedes \\
                 Early Mathematics in India \\
                 The Chinese Hundred Fowls Problem \\
                 5.4 The Later Commentators \\
                 The Mathematical Collection of Pappus \\
                 Hypatia, the First Woman Mathematician \\
                 Roman Mathematics: Boethius and Cassiodorus \\
                 5.5 Mathematics in the Near and Far East \\
                 The Algebra of al-Khow{\^a}rizm{\^\i} \\
                 Ab{\^u} Kamil and Th{\^a}bit ibn Qurra \\
                 Omar Khayyam \\
                 The Astronomers al-Tusi and al-Karashi \\
                 The Ancient Chinese Nine Chapters \\
                 Later Chinese Mathematical Works \\
                 \\
                 6 The First Awakening: Fibonacci \\
                 6.1 The Decline and Revival of Learning \\
                 The Carolingian Pre-Renaissance \\
                 Transmission of Arabic Learning to the West \\
                 The Pioneer Translators: Gerard and Adelard \\
                 6.2 The Liber Abaci and Liber Quadratorum \\
                 The Hindu-Arabic Numerals \\
                 Fibonacci's Liver Quadratorum \\
                 The Works of Jordanus de Nemore \\
                 6.3 The Fibonacci Sequence \\
                 The Liber Abaci's Rabbit Problem \\
                 Some Properties of Fibonacci Numbers \\
                 6.4 Fibonacci and the Pythagorean Problem \\
                 Pythagorean Number Triples \\
                 Fibonacci's Tournament Problem \\
                 \\
                 7 The Renaissance of Mathematics: Cardan and Tartaglia
                 \\
                 7.1 Europe in the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Centuries
                 \\
                 The Italian Renaissance \\
                 Artificial Writing: The Invention of Printing \\
                 Founding of the Great Universities \\
                 A Thirst for Classical Learning \\
                 7.2 The Battle of the Scholars \\
                 Restoring the Algebraic Tradition: Robert Recorde \\
                 The Italian Algebraists: Pacioli, del Ferro and
                 Tartaglia \\
                 Cardan, A Scoundrel Mathematician \\
                 7.3 Cardan's Ars Magna \\
                 Cardan's Solution of the Cubic Equation \\
                 Bombelli and Imaginary Roots of the Cubic \\
                 7.4 Ferrari's Solution of the Quartic Equation \\
                 The Resolvant Cubic \\
                 The Story of the Quintic Equation: Ruffini, Abel and
                 Galois \\
                 \\
                 8 The Mechanical World: Descartes and Newton \\
                 8.1 The Dawn of Modern Mathematics \\
                 The Seventeenth Century Spread of Knowledge \\
                 Galileo's Telescopic Observations \\
                 The Beginning of Modern Notation: Fran{\c{c}}ois
                 Vi{\`e}ta \\
                 The Decimal Fractions of Simon Steven \\
                 Napier's Invention of Logarithms \\
                 The Astronomical Discoveries of Brahe and Kepler \\
                 8.2 Descartes: The Discours de la M{\'e}thod \\
                 The Writings of Descartes \\
                 Inventing Cartesian Geometry \\
                 The Algebraic Aspect of La G{\'e}ometrie \\
                 Descartes' Principia Philosophia \\
                 Perspective Geometry: Desargues and Poncelet \\
                 8.3 Newton: The Principia Mathematica \\
                 The Textbooks of Oughtred and Harriot \\
                 Wallis' Arithmetica Infinitorum \\
                 The Lucasian Professorship: Barrow and Newton \\
                 Newton's Golden Years \\
                 The Laws of Motion \\
                 Later Years: Appointment to the Mint \\
                 8.4 Gottfried Leibniz: The Calculus Controversy \\
                 The Early Work of Leibniz \\
                 Leibniz's Creation of the Calculus \\
                 Newton's Fluxional Calculus \\
                 The Dispute over Priority \\
                 Maria Agnesi and Emilie du Ch{\^a}telet \\
                 \\
                 9 The Development of Probability Theory: Pascal,
                 Bernoulli, and Laplace \\
                 9.1 The Origins of Probability Theory \\
                 Graunt's Bills of Mortality \\
                 Games of Chance: Dice and Cards \\
                 The Precocity of the Young Pascal \\
                 Pascal and the Cycloid \\
                 De M{\`e}re;'s Problem of Points \\
                 9.2 Pascal's Arithmetic Triangle \\
                 The Trait{\'e} du Triangle Arithm{\'e}tique \\
                 Mathematical Induction \\
                 Francesco Maurolico's Use of Induction \\
                 9.3 The Bernoullis and Laplace \\
                 Christiaan Huygens's Pamphlet on Probability \\
                 The Bernoulli Brothers: John and James \\
                 De Moivre's Doctrine of Chances \\
                 The Mathematics of Celestial Phenomena: Laplace \\
                 Mary Fairfax Somerville \\
                 Laplace's Research on Probability Theory \\
                 Daniel Bernoulli, Poisson, and Chebyshev \\
                 \\
                 10 The Revival of Number Theory: Fermat, Euler, and
                 Gauss \\
                 10.1 Martin Mersenne and the Search for Perfect Numbers
                 \\
                 Scientific Societies \\
                 Marin Mersenne's Mathematical Gathering \\
                 Numbers, Perfect and Not So Perfect \\
                 10.2 From Fermat to Euler \\
                 Fermat's Arithmetica \\
                 The Famous Last Theorem of Fermat \\
                 The Eighteenth-Century Enlightenment \\
                 Maclaurin's Treatise on Fluxions \\
                 Euler's Life and Contributions \\
                 10.3 The Prince of Mathematicians: Carl Friedrich Gauss
                 \\
                 The Period of the French Revolution: Lagrange and Monge
                 \\
                 Gauss's Disquisitiones Arithmeticae \\
                 The Legacy of Gauss: Congruence Theory \\
                 Dirichlet and Jacobi \\
                 \\
                 11 Nineteenth-Century Contributions: Lobachevsky to
                 Hilbert \\
                 11.1 Attempts to Prove the Parallel Postulate \\
                 The Efforts of Proclus, Playfair, and Wallis \\
                 Saccheri Quadrilaterals \\
                 The Accomplishments of Legendre \\
                 Legendre's {\'E}l{\'e}ments de g{\'e}ometrie \\
                 11.2 The Founders of Non-Euclidean Geometry \\
                 Gauss's Attempt at a New Geometry \\
                 The Struggle of John Bolyai \\
                 Creation of Non-Euclidean Geometry: Lobachevsky \\
                 Models of the New Geometry: Riemann, Beltrami, and
                 Klein \\
                 Grace Chisholm Young \\
                 11.3 The Age of Rigor \\
                 D'Alembert and Cauchy on Limits \\
                 Fourier's Series \\
                 The Father of Modern Analysis, Weierstrass \\
                 Sonya Kovalevsky \\
                 The Axiomatic Movement: Pasch and Hilbert \\
                 11.4 Arithmetic Generalized \\
                 Babbage and the Analytical Engine \\
                 Peacock's Treatise on Algebra \\
                 The Representations of Complex Numbers \\
                 Hamilton's Discovery of Quaternions \\
                 Matrix Algebra: Cayley and Sylvester \\
                 Boole's Algebra of Logic \\
                 \\
                 12 Transition to the Twenthieth Century: Cantor and
                 Kronecker \\
                 12.1 The Emergence of American Mathematics \\
                 Ascendency of the German Universities \\
                 American Mathematics Takes Root: 1800--1900 \\
                 The Twentieth Century Consolidation \\
                 12.2 Counting the Infinite \\
                 The Last Universalist: Poincar{\'e} \\
                 Cantor's Theory of Infinite Sets \\
                 Kronecker's View of Set Theory \\
                 Countable and Uncountable Sets \\
                 Transcendental Numbers \\
                 The Continuum Hypothesis \\
                 12.3 The Paradoxes of Set Theory \\
                 The Early Paradoxes \\
                 Zermelo and the Axiom of Choice \\
                 The Logistic School: Frege, Peano and Russell \\
                 Hilbert's Formalistic Approach \\
                 Brouwer's Intuitionism \\
                 \\
                 13 Extensions and Generalizations: Hardy, Hausdorff,
                 and Noether \\
                 13.1 Hardy and Ramanujan \\
                 The Tripos Examination \\
                 The Rejuvenation of English Mathematics \\
                 A Unique Collaboration: Hardy and Littlewood \\
                 India's Prodigy, Ramanujan \\
                 13.2 The Beginnings of Point-Set Topology \\
                 Frechet's Metric Spaces \\
                 The Neighborhood Spaces of Hausdorff \\
                 Banach and Normed Linear Spaces \\
                 13.3 Some Twentieth-Century Developments \\
                 Emmy Noether's Theory of Rings \\
                 Von Neumann and the Computer \\
                 Women in Modern Mathematics \\
                 A Few Recent Advances \\
                 \\
                 General Bibliography \\
                 Additional Reading \\
                 The Greek Alphabet \\
                 Solutions to Selected Problems \\
                 Index",
}

@Book{Busch:1999:GGG,
  author =       "David D. Busch",
  title =        "Great graphics with {GIMP}",
  publisher =    pub-PRIMA,
  address =      pub-PRIMA:adr,
  pages =        "xxx + 370",
  year =         "1999",
  ISBN =         "0-7615-2407-X",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-7615-2407-6",
  LCCN =         "T385 .B8664 2000",
  bibdate =      "Mon Nov 15 15:56:11 2004",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  note =         "Edited by Kevin Harreld and Kim Spilker.",
  price =        "US\$40.00",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  libnote =      "Not in my library.",
  subject =      "Computer graphics; GIMP (Computer file)",
}

@Misc{Bush:1940:AM,
  author =       "V. Bush",
  title =        "Arithmetical Machine",
  howpublished = "Vannevar Bush Papers, Container 18, Folder: Caldwell,
                 Samuel, 1939--1940",
  year =         "1940",
  bibdate =      "Wed Oct 13 11:37:32 2010",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  note =         "Reprinted in \cite[\S 7.3]{Randell:1982:ODC}.
                 Copyright interest in the unpublished writings of
                 Vannevar Bush has been dedicated to the public.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Bush:1945:SEF,
  author =       "Vannevar Bush",
  title =        "Science, the endless frontier: a report to the
                 {President}: {Bush} report on scientific research in
                 the {United States}",
  publisher =    pub-USGPO,
  address =      pub-USGPO:adr,
  pages =        "xxvi + 220",
  year =         "1945",
  LCCN =         "Q127.U6 A53 1945",
  bibdate =      "Thu Sep 20 10:11:05 MDT 2018",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 z3950.loc.gov:7090/Voyager",
  URL =          "https://ia600207.us.archive.org/12/items/scienceendlessfr00unit/scienceendlessfr00unit.pdf",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  remark =       "Report to the President on a program for postwar
                 scientific research. Appendices: Committees consulted.
                 Report of the Medical advisory committee. Report of the
                 Committee on science and the public welfare. Report of
                 the Committee on discovery and development of
                 scientific talent. Report of the Committee on
                 publication of scientific information. Commonly known
                 as the Bush report. [The PDF file in the URL link is
                 from the original book, including its cover, and is 252
                 pages long. The section ``The importance of basic
                 research'' is on pages 18--19.]",
  subject =      "Science and state; United States; Research; World war,
                 1939--1945; Science",
  xxpages =      "ix + 184",
}

@Book{Butler:1964:SPC,
  author =       "James Newton Butler",
  title =        "Solubility and {pH} Calculations: The Mathematics of
                 the Simplest Ionic Equilibria",
  publisher =    pub-AW,
  address =      pub-AW:adr,
  pages =        "viii + 104",
  year =         "1964",
  LCCN =         "QD42 .B87",
  bibdate =      "Sat Jul 25 13:55:27 1998",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  xxISBN =       "none",
}

@Book{Byrd:1971:HEI,
  author =       "Paul F. Byrd and Morris D. Friedman",
  title =        "Handbook of Elliptic Integrals for Engineers and
                 Scientists",
  volume =       "67",
  publisher =    pub-SV,
  address =      pub-SV:adr,
  edition =      "Second",
  pages =        "xvi + 358",
  year =         "1971",
  DOI =          "https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-65138-0",
  ISBN =         "0-387-05318-2 (New York)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-387-05318-9 (New York)",
  LCCN =         "QA343 .B95 1971",
  bibdate =      "Mon Oct 15 16:40:14 MDT 2007",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/elefunt.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/mathcw.bib;
                 z3950.loc.gov:7090/Voyager",
  series =       "Die Grundlehren der mathematischen Wissenschaften in
                 Einzeldarstellungen",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  subject =      "Elliptic functions",
  tableofcontents = "Introduction / 1--7 \\
                 Definitions and Fundamental Relations / 8--41 \\
                 Reduction of Algebraic Integrands to Jacobian Elliptic
                 Functions / 42--161 \\
                 Reduction of Trigonometric Integrands to Jacobian
                 Elliptic Functions / 162--181 \\
                 Reduction of Hyperbolic Integrands to Jacobian Elliptic
                 Functions / 182--190 \\
                 Table of Integrals of Jacobian Elliptic Functions /
                 191--222 \\
                 Elliptic Integrals of the Third Kind / 223--239 \\
                 Miscellaneous Elliptic Integrals Involving
                 Trigonometric and Hyperbolic Integrands / 240--248 \\
                 Elliptic Integrals Resulting from Laplace
                 Transformations / 249--251 \\
                 Hyperelliptic Integrals / 252--271 \\
                 Integrals of the Elliptic Integrals / 272--281 \\
                 Derivatives / 282--287 \\
                 Miscellaneous Integrals and Formulas / 288--297 \\
                 Expansions in Series / 298--307 \\
                 Appendix / 308 \\
                 Bibliography / 351 \\
                 Supplemental Bibliography / 353 \\
                 Index / 355",
}

@Book{Cahill:1995:HIS,
  author =       "Thomas Cahill",
  title =        "How the {Irish} Saved Civilization: the Untold Story
                 of {Ireland}'s Heroic Role from the Fall of {Rome} to
                 the Rise of Medieval {Europe}",
  publisher =    "Nan A. Talese, Doubleday",
  address =      "New York, NY, USA",
  pages =        "x + 246",
  year =         "1995",
  ISBN =         "0-385-41848-5",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-385-41848-5",
  LCCN =         "DA930.5 .C34 1995",
  bibdate =      "Thu Sep 18 21:40:22 MDT 2008",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 z3950.loc.gov:7090/Voyager",
  price =        "US\$20.00",
  URL =          "http://www.loc.gov/catdir/bios/random057/94028130.html;
                 http://www.loc.gov/catdir/description/random043/94028130.html;
                 http://www.loc.gov/catdir/samples/random041/94028130.html",
  abstract =     "The perfect St. Patrick's Day gift, and a book in the
                 best tradition of popular history -- the untold story
                 of Ireland's role in maintaining Western culture while
                 the Dark Ages settled on Europe. Every year millions of
                 Americans celebrate St. Patrick's Day, but they may not
                 be aware of how great an influence St. Patrick was on
                 the subsequent history of civilization. Not only did he
                 bring Christianity to Ireland, he instilled a sense of
                 literacy and learning that would create the conditions
                 that allowed Ireland to become ``the isle of saints and
                 scholars''--And thus preserve Western culture while
                 Europe was being overrun by barbarians. In this
                 entertaining and compelling narrative, Thomas Cahill
                 tells the story of how Europe evolved from the
                 classical age of Rome to the medieval era. Without
                 Ireland, the transition could not have taken place. Not
                 only did Irish monks and scribes maintain the very
                 record of Western civilization -- copying manuscripts
                 of Greek and Latin writers, both pagan and Christian,
                 while libraries and learning on the continent were
                 forever lost -- they brought their uniquely Irish
                 world-view to the task. As Cahill delightfully
                 illustrates, so much of the liveliness we associate
                 with medieval culture has its roots in Ireland. When
                 the seeds of culture were replanted on the European
                 continent, it was from Ireland that they were
                 germinated. In the tradition of Barbara Tuchman's
                 \booktitle{A Distant Mirror}, \booktitle{How The Irish
                 Saved Civilization} reconstructs an era that few know
                 about but which is central to understanding our past
                 and our cultural heritage. But it conveys its knowledge
                 with a winking wit that aptly captures the sensibility
                 of the unsung Irish who relaunched civilization.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  subject =      "Ireland; Civilization; To 1172; Learning and
                 scholarship; History; Medieval, 500--1500;
                 Civilization, Classical; Study and teaching; Europe;
                 Irish influences; Books; 400-1400; Manuscripts;
                 Monastic libraries; Transmission of texts; Scriptoria",
  tableofcontents = "Introduction: How Real Is History? \\
                 I: The End of the World: How Rome Fell \\
                 And Why \\
                 II: What Was Lost: The Complexities of the Classical
                 Tradition \\
                 III: A Shifting World of Darkness: Unholy Ireland \\
                 IV: Good News from Far Off: The First Missionary \\
                 V: A Solid World of Light: Holy Ireland \\
                 VI: What Was Found: How the Irish Saved Civilization
                 \\
                 VII: The End of the World: Is There Any Hope?",
}

@Book{Calaprice:2004:EA,
  author =       "Alice Calaprice",
  title =        "The {Einstein} almanac",
  publisher =    pub-JOHNS-HOPKINS,
  address =      pub-JOHNS-HOPKINS:adr,
  pages =        "xvii + 176",
  year =         "2004",
  ISBN =         "0-8018-8021-1",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-8018-8021-6",
  LCCN =         "QC16.E5 C35 2004",
  bibdate =      "Fri Dec 17 10:27:22 MST 2004",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/einstein.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 z3950.loc.gov:7090/Voyager",
  URL =          "ftp://uiarchive.cso.uiuc.edu/pub/etext/gutenberg/;
                 http://www.loc.gov/catdir/bios/jhu051/2004009048.html;
                 http://www.loc.gov/catdir/description/jhu051/2004009048.html;
                 http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/ecip0417/2004009048.html",
  abstract =     "Albert Einstein was an exceptional human being.
                 Perhaps nothing reflects the breadth and scope of his
                 brilliance, his interests, and his influence better
                 than his publications --- more than six hundred
                 scientific papers, books, essays, reviews, and opinion
                 pieces. His published work ranged widely over
                 relativity theory and quantum physics, nationalism,
                 Judaism, war, peace, and education. Indeed, Einstein's
                 literary output was so abundant that even many of his
                 most informed admirers are not familiar with all of it.
                 The Einstein Almanac takes a look at Einstein's
                 year-by-year output, explaining his three hundred most
                 important publications and setting them into the
                 context of his life, science, and world history.
                 Concentrating primarily on Einstein's scientific and
                 humanitarian writings, Alice Calaprice summarizes most
                 of the papers and describes meaningful events
                 surrounding their publication, including Einstein's
                 personal life, his travels, the work of other
                 scientists, social and cultural developments at he
                 time, and national and international events.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  remark =       "A brief Einstein timeline for the years 1879--1900 --
                 Selected published papers and commentary, 1901--1955",
  subject =      "Einstein, Albert; Physicists; Biography; Relativity
                 (Physics); History; Physics; History; 20th century;
                 Einstein, Albert, Bibliography",
  subject-dates = "Albert Einstein (1879--1955)",
  tableofcontents = "A brief Einstein timeline for the years 1879--1900
                 \\
                 Selected published papers and commentary, 1901--1955",
}

@Book{Cameron:1991:LGE,
  author =       "Debra Cameron and Bill Rosenblatt",
  title =        "Learning {GNU} Emacs",
  publisher =    pub-ORA,
  address =      pub-ORA:adr,
  pages =        "xxvii + 411",
  year =         "1991",
  ISBN =         "0-937175-84-6",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-937175-84-2",
  LCCN =         "QA76.76.T49 C35 1991",
  bibdate =      "Tue Dec 14 22:43:25 1993",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/bibnet/subjects/acc-stab-num-alg.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/bibnet/subjects/han-wri-mat-sci-2ed.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/gnu.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/ora.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/unix.bib",
  URL =          "http://www.oreilly.com/catalog/9780937175842",
  abstract =     "GNU Emacs is the most popular and widespread of the
                 Emacs family of editors. It is also the most powerful
                 and flexible. (Unlike all other text editors, GNU Emacs
                 is a complete working environment --- you can stay
                 within Emacs all day without leaving.) This book tells
                 you how to get started with the GNU Emacs editor. It
                 will also ``grow'' with you: as you become more
                 proficient, this book will help you learn how to use
                 Emacs more effectively. It will take you from basic
                 Emacs usage (simple text editing) to moderately
                 complicated customization and programming. Topics
                 covered include: Using Emacs to read and write
                 electronic mail. Using Emacs as a ``shell
                 environment.'' How to take advantage of ``built-in''
                 formatting features. Customizing Emacs. Whys and hows
                 of writing macros to circumvent repetitious tasks.
                 Emacs as a programming environment. The basics of Emacs
                 LISP. The Emacs interface to the X Window System. How
                 to get Emacs. The book is aimed at new Emacs users,
                 whether or not they are programmers. Also useful for
                 readers switching from other Emacs implementations to
                 GNU Emacs. Covers Version 18.57 of the GNU Emacs
                 editor.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  shorttableofcontents = "1: Emacs Basics / 1 \\
                 2: Editing Files / 22 \\
                 3: Search and Replace Operations / 49 \\
                 4: Using Buffers and Windows / 74 \\
                 5: Emacs as a Work Environment 9 / 5 \\
                 6: Simple Text Formatting and Specialized Editing / 136
                 \\
                 7: Using Emacs with UNIX Text Formatters / 175 \\
                 8: Writing Macros / 197 \\
                 9: Customizing Emacs / 214 \\
                 10: Emacs For Programmers / 230 \\
                 11: Emacs LISP Programming / 259 \\
                 12: Emacs for the X Window System / 302 \\
                 13: Online Help / 318 \\
                 Appendix A: How to Get Emacs / 330 \\
                 Appendix B: Making Emacs Work the Way You Think It
                 Should / 336 \\
                 Appendix C: Emacs Variables / 338 \\
                 Appendix D: Emacs LISP Packages / 347 \\
                 Appendix E: Bugs and Bug Fixes / 353 \\
                 Appendix F: Public Statements / 355 \\
                 The GNU General Public License / 355 \\
                 General Public License, Version 1 / 356 \\
                 General Public License, Version 2 / 362 \\
                 GNU Manifesto / 369 \\
                 The League for Programming Freedom / 369 \\
                 Appendix G: Give and It Shall Be Given / 372 \\
                 Appendix H: Quick Reference / 373 \\
                 Index / 383",
  tableofcontents = "Preface / xvi \\
                 Why Read This Book? / xvi \\
                 Which Emacs is Which? / xviii \\
                 GNU Emacs and the Free Software Foundation / xix \\
                 An Approach to Learning Emacs / xxi \\
                 What We Haven't Included / xxiii \\
                 Conventions Used in This Handbook / xxiv \\
                 Emacs Commands / xxiv \\
                 Examples / xxv \\
                 Font Usage / xxvi \\
                 Acknowledgments / xxvii \\
                 1: Emacs Basics / 1 \\
                 Introducing Emacs! / 1 \\
                 Understanding Files and Buffers / 3 \\
                 A Word about Modes / 4 \\
                 Starting Emacs / 6 \\
                 About the Emacs Screen / 7 \\
                 Emacs Commands / 8 \\
                 Reading a File / 9 \\
                 Letting Emacs Fill in the Blanks 1 / 1 \\
                 Inserting and Appending Files / 12 \\
                 How Emacs Chooses a Default Directory 1 / 3 \\
                 Saving Files: 1 / 3 \\
                 Leaving Emacs / 14 \\
                 Temporarily Suspending Emacs / 14 \\
                 Customizing Emacs and its Pitfalls 1 / 5 \\
                 Getting Help / 17 \\
                 Summary / 19 \\
                 Problem Checklist / 20 \\
                 2: Editing Files / 22 \\
                 Text Mode and Fill Mode / 23 \\
                 What Happens Without Fill Mode / 23 \\
                 Moving the Cursor / 24 \\
                 Repeating Commands / 25 \\
                 Other Ways to Move the Cursor / 27 \\
                 Moving a Screen (or More) at a Time / 29 \\
                 Redisplaying the Screen / 30 \\
                 Deleting Text 3 / 1 \\
                 Recovering What You've Deleted / 32 \\
                 Marking Text to Delete, Move, or Copy / 35 \\
                 Copying Text / 38 \\
                 More about the Kill Ring / 39 \\
                 Reformatting Paragraphs / 40 \\
                 Stopping and Undoing Commands / 41 \\
                 Stopping Commands / 42 \\
                 Undoing Changes / 42 \\
                 Backup Files / 43 \\
                 Editing Tricks and Shortcuts / 44 \\
                 Fixing Transpositions / 44 \\
                 Capitalization / 45 \\
                 Typing over Old Text with Overwrite Mode / 47 \\
                 Problem Checklist / 47 \\
                 3: Search and Replace Operations / 49 \\
                 Different Kinds of Searches 4 / 9 \\
                 Incremental Search 5 / 1 \\
                 Simple Searches / 54 \\
                 Word Search 5 / 5 \\
                 Search and Replace 5 / 5 \\
                 Simple Search and Replace Operations / 56 \\
                 Query-replace / 57 \\
                 Recursive Editing / 59 \\
                 Are Emacs Searches Case-sensitive? / 60 \\
                 Regular Expressions for Search and Replacement
                 Operations 6 / 1 \\
                 Checking Spelling 6 / 3 \\
                 Word Abbreviation Mode / 67 \\
                 Trying Word Abbreviations for One Session / 69 \\
                 Making Word Abbreviations Part of Your Startup / 70 \\
                 Deleting a Word Abbreviation / 70 \\
                 Disabling Word Abbreviations / 71 \\
                 Abbreviations and Capitalization / 72 \\
                 4: Using Buffers and Windows / 74 \\
                 Files, Buffers, and Windows / 74 \\
                 Working with Multiple Buffers / 76 \\
                 Saving Multiple Buffers / 78 \\
                 Deleting Buffers 7 / 8 \\
                 Renaming Buffers / 79 \\
                 Read-only Buffers 8 / 0 \\
                 Getting a List of Buffers 8 / 0 \\
                 Working with the Buffer List / 82 \\
                 Working with Windows 8 / 5 \\
                 Creating Horizontal Windows 8 / 6 \\
                 Creating Vertical or Side-by-side Windows / 87 \\
                 Moving Between Windows 8 / 8 \\
                 Getting Rid of Windows 9 / 0 \\
                 Growing Windows and Shrinking Them 9 / 0 \\
                 Shortcut Commands for Working with Other Windows / 92
                 \\
                 Comparing Files Between Windows / 92 \\
                 Displaying Buffers from the Buffer List 9 / 4 \\
                 5: Emacs as a Work Environment 9 / 5 \\
                 Working with Mail 9 / 6 \\
                 Sending Mail from within Emacs 9 / 6 \\
                 Executing UNIX Commands in Shell Windows / 118 \\
                 Using Shell Mode / 122 \\
                 Working with Directories / 128 \\
                 Getting into Dired / 128 \\
                 Deleting Files with Dired / 130 \\
                 Copying and Renaming Files with Dired / 131 \\
                 Printing from Emacs / 133 \\
                 Reading Man Pages from Emacs / 134 \\
                 Using Your Emacs Work Environment / 135 \\
                 6: Simple Text Formatting and Specialized Editing / 136
                 \\
                 Indenting Text / 137 \\
                 Using Tabs / 137 \\
                 Using Fill Prefixes / 142 \\
                 Indented Text Mode / 144 \\
                 Indenting Regions / 146 \\
                 Some Other Tricks / 146 \\
                 Centering Text / 148 \\
                 Inserting Page Breaks / 150 \\
                 Rectangle Editing / 150 \\
                 Making Simple Drawings / 157 \\
                 Drawing in Picture Mode / 158 \\
                 Editing in Picture Mode / 161 \\
                 Using Rectangle Commands in Picture Mode / 166 \\
                 Using Outline Mode / 168 \\
                 Entering Outline Mode / 169 \\
                 Hiding and Showing Text / 170 \\
                 Editing While Text is Hidden / 173 \\
                 Customizing Outline Mode / 174 \\
                 7: Using Emacs with UNIX Text Formatters / 175 \\
                 Comments / 176 \\
                 Finding Headings 17 / 7 \\
                 Marking Up Text for troff and nroff / 177 \\
                 Paragraph Formatting / 178 \\
                 Navigation / 179 \\
                 Macro Pairs / 180 \\
                 Making nroff Mode Part of Your Startup / 182 \\
                 Marking Up Text for TeX and LaTeX / 183 \\
                 Matching Braces / 183 \\
                 Quotation Marks and Paragraphing / 186 \\
                 Comments / 187 \\
                 Processing and Printing Text / 187 \\
                 Differences for LaTeX Mode / 188 \\
                 Marking Up Text for Scribe / 189 \\
                 Marking Environments / 190 \\
                 Marking Fonts / 193 \\
                 Tabs, Quotation Marks, and Parentheses / 194 \\
                 8: Writing Macros / 197 \\
                 What is a Macro? / 197 \\
                 Defining a Macro / 198 \\
                 Tips for Creating Good Macros / 201 \\
                 A More Complicated Macro Example / 203 \\
                 Adding to an Existing Macro / 204 \\
                 Naming and Saving Your Macros / 205 \\
                 Executing a Macro You've Named / 206 \\
                 Building More Complicated Macros / 207 \\
                 Pausing a Macro for Keyboard Input / 208 \\
                 Adding a Query to a Macro / 210 \\
                 Beyond Macros / 212 \\
                 9: Customizing Emacs / 214 \\
                 Keyboard Customization / 215 \\
                 Getting Around Flow-control Problems / 218 \\
                 Special Keys / 220 \\
                 Terminal Support / 223 \\
                 Emacs Variables / 226 \\
                 Emacs LISP Packages / 227 \\
                 Auto-mode Customization / 228 \\
                 10: Emacs For Programmers / 230 \\
                 Language Modes / 231 \\
                 Syntax / 232 \\
                 Formatting / 233 \\
                 C Mode / 237 \\
                 Etags / 242 \\
                 The LISP Modes / 244 \\
                 FORTRAN Mode / 252 \\
                 11: Emacs LISP Programming / 259 \\
                 Introduction to LISP / 260 \\
                 Basic LISP Entities / 261 \\
                 Defining Functions / 263 \\
                 Turning LISP Functions into Emacs Commands / 266 \\
                 LISP Primitive Functions / 269 \\
                 Statement Blocks / 270 \\
                 Control Structures / 271 \\
                 Useful Built-in Emacs Functions / 274 \\
                 Buffers, Text, and Regions / 274 \\
                 Regular Expressions / 276 \\
                 Functions that Use Regular Expressions / 284 \\
                 Finding Other Built-in Functions / 285 \\
                 Programming a Major Mode / 286 \\
                 Components of a Major Mode / 287 \\
                 More LISP Basics: Lists / 289 \\
                 The Calculator Mode / 290 \\
                 LISP Code for the Calculator Mode / 292 \\
                 Customizing Existing Modes / 295 \\
                 Building Your Own LISP Library / 299 \\
                 Byte-compiling LISP Files / 301 \\
                 12: Emacs for the X Window System / 302 \\
                 Invoking Emacs under X / 303 \\
                 Command Line and .X11Startup Options / 304 \\
                 .Xdefaults File / 306 \\
                 Mouse Commands / 307 \\
                 Creating Mouse Commands / 312 \\
                 Creating Popup Menus / 314 \\
                 13: Online Help / 318 \\
                 Completion / 319 \\
                 Customizing Completion / 321 \\
                 Help Commands / 322 \\
                 Detail Information / 323 \\
                 Apropos Commands / 325 \\
                 General Information / 327 \\
                 Help in Complex Emacs Commands / 328 \\
                 Appendix A: How to Get Emacs / 330 \\
                 FTP on Internet 33 / 1 \\
                 Uucp on UUNET / 332 \\
                 Magnetic Media / 334 \\
                 MS-DOS Versions of Emacs / 335 \\
                 Appendix B: Making Emacs Work the Way You Think It
                 Should / 336 \\
                 Appendix C: Emacs Variables / 338 \\
                 Appendix D: Emacs LISP Packages / 347 \\
                 Appendix E: Bugs and Bug Fixes / 353 \\
                 Appendix F: Public Statements / 355 \\
                 The GNU General Public License / 355 \\
                 General Public License, Version 1 / 356 \\
                 General Public License, Version 2 / 362 \\
                 GNU Manifesto / 369 \\
                 The League for Programming Freedom / 369 \\
                 Appendix G: Give and It Shall Be Given / 372 \\
                 Appendix H: Quick Reference / 373 \\
                 Index / 383",
}

@Book{Campbell-Kelly:2003:HMT,
  editor =       "Martin Campbell-Kelly and Mary Croarken and Raymond
                 Flood and Eleanor Robson",
  title =        "The History of Mathematical Tables: From {Sumer} to
                 Spreadsheets",
  publisher =    pub-OXFORD,
  address =      pub-OXFORD:adr,
  pages =        "viii + 361",
  year =         "2003",
  ISBN =         "0-19-850841-7",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-19-850841-0",
  LCCN =         "QA47 .H57 2003",
  bibdate =      "Mon Dec 31 17:28:46 MST 2007",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 z3950.loc.gov:7090/Voyager",
  URL =          "http://www.loc.gov/catdir/enhancements/fy0620/2004298837-d.html;
                 http://www.loc.gov/catdir/enhancements/fy0620/2004298837-t.html",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  libnote =      "Not in my library.",
  subject =      "mathematics; tables; history",
  tableofcontents = "Tables and tabular formatting in Sumer, Babylonia,
                 and Assyria, 2500 BCE--50 CE \\
                 The making of logarithm tables \\
                 History of actuarial tables \\
                 The computation factory: de Prony's project for making
                 tables in the 1790s \\
                 Difference engines: from M{\"u}ller to Comrie \\
                 The `unerring certainty of mechanical agency': machines
                 and table making in the nineteenth century \\
                 Table making in astronomy \\
                 The General Register Office and the tabulation of data,
                 1837--1939 \\
                 Table making by committee: British table makers,
                 1871--1965 \\
                 Table making for the relief of labour \\
                 The making of astronomical tables in HM Nautical
                 Almanac Office \\
                 The rise and rise of the spreadsheet",
}

@Book{Campbell:1987:CPG,
  author =       "Joe Campbell",
  title =        "{C} Programmer's Guide to Serial Communications",
  publisher =    pub-HWS,
  address =      pub-HWS:adr,
  pages =        "xii + 655",
  year =         "1987",
  ISBN =         "0-672-22584-0",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-672-22584-0",
  LCCN =         "QA76.73.C15 C36 1987",
  bibdate =      "Tue Dec 14 23:27:20 1993",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  price =        "US\$22.95",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Campbell:2006:MSS,
  author =       "S. L. (Stephen La Vern) Campbell and Jean-Philippe
                 Chancelier and Ramine Nikoukhah",
  title =        "Modeling and Simulation in {Scilab\slash Scicos}",
  publisher =    "Springer Science+Business Media",
  address =      "New York, NY, USA",
  pages =        "xi + 313",
  year =         "2006",
  ISBN =         "0-387-27802-8 (hardcover)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-387-27802-5 (hardcover)",
  LCCN =         "Q183.9 .C36 2006",
  bibdate =      "Sat Jun 13 10:59:00 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/maple-extract.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 z3950.loc.gov:7090/Voyager",
  URL =          "http://www.loc.gov/catdir/enhancements/fy0663/2005930797-d.html;
                 http://www.loc.gov/catdir/enhancements/fy0814/2005930797-b.html;
                 http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/fy0705/2005930797.html",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  libnote =      "Not in my library.",
  subject =      "Scilab; Science; Data processing; Computer programs",
  tableofcontents = "Part I. Scilab \\
                 1. General information \\
                 2. Introduction to Scilab \\
                 3. Modeling and simulation in Scilab \\
                 4. Optimization \\
                 5. Examples \\
                 Part II. Scicos \\
                 6. Introduction \\
                 7. Getting started \\
                 8. Scicos formalism \\
                 9. Scicos blocks \\
                 10. Examples \\
                 11. Batch processing in Scilab \\
                 12. Code generation \\
                 13. Debugging \\
                 14. Implicit Scicos and modelica \\
                 A. Inside Scicos \\
                 B. Scicos blocks of type 5 \\
                 C. Animation program for the car example \\
                 D. Extraction program for the \LaTeX{} graphic example
                 \\
                 E. Maple code used for modeling the $N$-link pendulum",
}

@Book{Carroll:1994:BBU,
  author =       "Paul Carroll",
  title =        "{Big Blues}: the unmaking of {IBM}",
  publisher =    "Crown Trade Paperbacks",
  address =      "New York, NY, USA",
  pages =        "v + 377",
  year =         "1994",
  ISBN =         "0-517-88221-3",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-517-88221-4",
  LCCN =         "HD9696.C64 I48317 1994",
  bibdate =      "Fri Jan 24 07:02:52 MST 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 z3950.loc.gov:7090/Voyager",
  URL =          "http://www.loc.gov/catdir/bios/random057/95145899.html",
  abstract =     "'It might be time to change IBM's nickname from Big
                 Blue to Black and Blue,' wrote the New York Times in
                 1993 as the company once revered worldwide as the
                 epitome of management excellence and technological
                 prowess reported losses of \$5.46 billion in just one
                 quarter's trading. Not surprisingly it was forced to
                 make savage cuts in its workforce worldwide, including
                 Britain. Once IBM employees were convinced they had a
                 job for life. Now as Paul Carroll, the Wall Street
                 Journal's IBM specialist, relates, other names in the
                 computer industry --- Apple and Microsoft in particular
                 lead the way. Big Blues is the inside story of why one
                 of the most successful enterprises in business history
                 no longer performs to expectations. Is the phrase ``IBM
                 compatible'' simply history? Or is there a future for
                 Big Blue?.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  libnote =      "Not in my library.",
  subject =      "Computer industry; United States; History; IBM
                 (International Business Machines Corporation)",
}

@Book{CAS:19xx:ICD,
  author =       "{Chemical Abstracts Service}",
  title =        "International {CODEN} Directory",
  publisher =    "Chemical Abstracts Service",
  address =      "2540 Olentangy River Road, Columbus, OH, USA",
  year =         "19xx",
  ISSN =         "0364-3670",
  bibdate =      "Fri Jul 30 08:06:48 2004",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  note =         "From the publisher's Web site: ``CODEN are unique,
                 six-character codes that identify serial and nonserial
                 publications produced worldwide. CODEN are assigned not
                 only to chemistry-related literature but to
                 publications in all subject areas.''",
  URL =          "http://www.cas.org/PRINTED/coden.html",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  remark =       "It appears that this is available only on microfiche.
                 The ACS Style Guide claims that it contains 190,500
                 publication titles and their CODEN values.",
}

@Book{Casselman:2005:MIM,
  author =       "Bill Casselman",
  title =        "Mathematical Illustrations: a Manual of Geometry and
                 {PostScript}",
  publisher =    pub-CAMBRIDGE,
  address =      pub-CAMBRIDGE:adr,
  pages =        "xviii + 318",
  year =         "2005",
  ISBN =         "0-521-83921-1 (hardcover), 0-521-54788-1 (paperback)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-521-83921-1 (hardcover), 978-0-521-54788-8
                 (paperback)",
  LCCN =         "QA76.73.P67 C37 2004",
  bibdate =      "Sun Sep 18 10:20:38 MDT 2005",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 z3950.loc.gov:7090/Voyager",
  price =        "US\$39.99 (paperback), US\$90.00 (hardcover)",
  URL =          "ftp://uiarchive.cso.uiuc.edu/pub/etext/gutenberg/;
                 http://www.loc.gov/catdir/description/cam041/2004045886.html;
                 http://www.loc.gov/catdir/samples/cam051/2004045886.html;
                 http://www.loc.gov/catdir/toc/cam041/2004045886.html",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  subject =      "PostScript (Computer program language)",
  tableofcontents = "1. Getting started in PostScript \\
                 2. Elementary coordinate geometry \\
                 3. Variables and procedures \\
                 4. Coordinates and conditionals \\
                 5. Drawing polygons: loops and arrays \\
                 6. Curves \\
                 7. Drawing curves automatically: procedures as
                 arguments \\
                 8. Non-linear 2D transformations: deconstructing paths
                 \\
                 9. Recursion in PostScript \\
                 10. Perspective and homogeneous coordinates \\
                 11. Introduction to drawing in three dimensions \\
                 12. Transformations in 3D \\
                 13. PostScript in 3D \\
                 14. Drawing surfaces in 3D \\
                 Appendix 1. Summary of PostScript commands \\
                 Appendix 2. Setting up your PostScript environment \\
                 Appendix 3. Structured PostScript documents \\
                 Appendix 4. Simple text display \\
                 Appendix 5. Zooming \\
                 Appendix 6. Evaluating polynomials: getting along
                 without variables \\
                 Appendix 7. Importing PostScript files \\
                 Epilogue",
}

@Manual{CASSI:1994:CAS,
  title =        "Chemical Abstracts Service Source Index",
  organization = "Chemical Abstracts Service, American Chemical
                 Society",
  address =      "Columbus, OH, USA",
  year =         "1994",
  CODEN =        "CASSI6",
  ISSN =         "0001-0634",
  LCCN =         "QD6.A12A44 S62",
  bibdate =      "Thu Apr 25 07:45:39 1996",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  note =         "Contains journal full names and abbreviations used in
                 the Chemical Abstracts database, plus ISSN and CODEN
                 values, for 18,656 active serials, 12,230 changed-title
                 serials, 7,486 inactive serials, 16,373 conference
                 proceedings, and 14,239 monographs containing
                 collections of papers.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  libnote =      "Not in my library.",
}

@Book{Cassidy:2009:BUH,
  author =       "David C. Cassidy",
  title =        "Beyond uncertainty: {Heisenberg}, quantum physics, and
                 the bomb",
  publisher =    "Bellevue Literary Press",
  address =      "New York, NY, USA",
  pages =        "480",
  year =         "2009",
  ISBN =         "1-934137-13-8",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-1-934137-13-0",
  LCCN =         "QC16.W518 C37 2008",
  bibdate =      "Sat Jun 13 08:37:12 MDT 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/bibnet/authors/b/bohr-niels.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/bibnet/authors/g/goudsmit-samuel-a.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/bibnet/authors/h/heisenberg-werner.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/bibnet/authors/p/planck-max.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/einstein.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/hsns.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 z3950.loc.gov:7090/Voyager",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  remark =       "Pages 367--368 describe the capture of Werner
                 Heisenberg on 3 May 1945 in his cabin in Urfeld am
                 Walchensee, about 50km south of Munich, by Colonel
                 Boris T. Pash. Hitler had committed suicide in Berlin
                 on 30 April 1945, and on 7 May 1945, Nazi Germany
                 surrendered, ending World War II in Europe.",
  subject =      "Heisenberg, Werner; physicists; Germany; biography;
                 atomic bomb; 20th Century History",
  tableofcontents = "The early years \\
                 The world at war \\
                 The gymnasium years \\
                 The battle of Munich \\
                 Finding his path \\
                 Sommerfeld's Institute \\
                 Confronting the quantum \\
                 Modeling atoms \\
                 Channeling rivers, challenging causality \\
                 Entering the matrix \\
                 Awash in matrices, rescued by waves \\
                 Determining uncertainty \\
                 Reaching the top \\
                 New frontiers \\
                 Into the abyss \\
                 Social atoms \\
                 Of particles and politics \\
                 Heir apparent \\
                 The lonely years \\
                 A Faustian bargain \\
                 One who could not leave \\
                 The war and its uses \\
                 Visiting Copenhagen \\
                 Ordering reality \\
                 Professor in Berlin \\
                 Return to the matrix \\
                 One last attempt \\
                 Explaining the project, Farm Hall \\
                 Explaining the project, the world \\
                 The later years",
}

@TechReport{Castaneda:pcfort,
  author =       "Fernando Castaneda and Frederick Chow and Peter Nye
                 and Dan Sleator and Gio Wiederhold",
  title =        "{PCFORT}: A {Fortran-to-Pcode} Translator",
  number =       "{STAN-CS-79-714}",
  institution =  pub-STAN-CSL,
  address =      pub-STAN-CSL:adr,
  month =        jan,
  year =         "1979",
  bibdate =      "Sun Oct 12 09:17:11 1997",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Castleman:1979:DIP,
  author =       "Kenneth R. Castleman",
  title =        "Digital Image Processing",
  publisher =    pub-PH,
  address =      pub-PH:adr,
  pages =        "xvi + 429",
  year =         "1979",
  ISBN =         "0-13-212365-7",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-13-212365-5",
  LCCN =         "TA1632 .C3 1979",
  bibdate =      "Fri Jul 22 08:29:04 1994",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  tableofcontents = "Images and Digital Processing \\
                 Digitizing Images \\
                 Digital Image Display \\
                 Image-Processing Software \\
                 The Gray-Level Histogram \\
                 Point Operations \\
                 Algebraic Operations \\
                 Geometric Operations \\
                 Linear Systems Theory \\
                 The Fourier Transform \\
                 Filter Design \\
                 Processing Sampled Data \\
                 Discrete Image Transforms \\
                 Wavelet Transforms \\
                 Optics and System Analysis \\
                 Image Restoration \\
                 Image Compression \\
                 Pattern Recognition: Image Segmentation \\
                 Pattern Recognition: Object Measurement \\
                 Pattern Recognition: Classification and Estimation \\
                 Color and Multispectral Image Processing \\
                 Three-Dimensional Image Processing \\
                 Appendices \\
                 Glossary of Image Processing Terms \\
                 Bibliography \\
                 Mathematical Background \\
                 Index",
}

@Book{Cathcart:2004:FCH,
  author =       "Brian Cathcart",
  title =        "The fly in the cathedral: how a group of {Cambridge}
                 scientists won the international race to split the
                 atom",
  publisher =    pub-FARRAR,
  address =      pub-FARRAR:adr,
  pages =        "xii + 308 + 4",
  year =         "2004",
  ISBN =         "0-374-15716-2 (hardcover)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-374-15716-6 (hardcover)",
  LCCN =         "Q141 .C2515 2004",
  bibdate =      "Sat Aug 31 14:20:41 MDT 2013",
  bibsource =    "fsz3950.oclc.org:210/WorldCat;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/bibnet/authors/r/rutherford-ernest.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/einstein.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  abstract =     "Re-creating the frustrations, excitement, and
                 obsessions of 1932, the ``miracle year'' of British
                 physics, Brian Cathcart reveals in rich detail the
                 astonishing story behind the splitting of the atom. The
                 most celebrated scientific experiment of its time, it
                 would help open the way toward one of mankind's most
                 devastating inventions --- the atomic bomb.",
  subject =      "Rutherford, Ernest; Walton, Ernest; Scientists;
                 England; Cambridge; Biography; Science; History;
                 Nuclear fission; Radioactivity",
  subject-dates = "1871--1937; 1903--1995",
  tableofcontents = "List of illustrations / vii \\
                 Foreword / xi \\
                 Prelude: Manchester, 1909 \\
                 Cavendish / 9 \\
                 `Mollycewels an' atoms' / 20 \\
                 Method / 36 \\
                 A way forward / 49 \\
                 A man in white trousers / 66 \\
                 A finite probability / 85 \\
                 Hardware / 101 \\
                 Lab life / 112 \\
                 Other ideas / 131 \\
                 Turning point / 152 \\
                 Off to the races / 176 \\
                 Timeliness and promise / 201 \\
                 Red letter day / 223 \\
                 Still safe / 244 \\
                 Nobel / 261 \\
                 Postscript / 272 \\
                 Notes / 275 \\
                 Acknowledgements / 290 \\
                 Bibliography / 293 \\
                 Index / 299",
}

@Book{Catmull:2014:CIO,
  author =       "Edwin E. Catmull and Amy Wallace",
  title =        "{Creativity, Inc.}: overcoming the unseen forces that
                 stand in the way of true inspiration",
  publisher =    pub-RANDOM-HOUSE,
  address =      pub-RANDOM-HOUSE:adr,
  pages =        "xvi + 340 + 8",
  year =         "2014",
  ISBN =         "0-8129-9301-2 (hardcover), 0-679-64450-4 (e-book)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-8129-9301-1 (hardcover), 978-0-679-64450-7
                 (e-book)",
  LCCN =         "HD53 .C394 2014",
  bibdate =      "Fri Jun 6 06:53:14 MDT 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 z3950.loc.gov:7090/Voyager",
  abstract =     "In 1986, Ed Catmull co-founded Pixar, a modest
                 start-up with an immodest goal: to make the first-ever
                 computer animated movie. Nine years later, Pixar
                 released Toy Story, which went on to revolutionize the
                 industry, gross \$360 million, and establish Pixar as
                 one of the most successful, innovative, and emulated
                 companies on earth. This book details how Catmull built
                 an enduring creative culture --- one that doesn't just
                 pay lip service to the importance of things like
                 honesty, communication, and originality, but committed
                 to them, no matter how difficult that often proved to
                 be. As he discovered, pursuing excellence isn't a
                 one-off assignment. It's an ongoing, day-in, day-out,
                 full-time job. And one he was born to do.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  libnote =      "Not in my library.",
  subject =      "creative ability in business; corporate culture;
                 organizational effectiveness; business and economics /
                 leadership; biography and autobiography / business;
                 performing arts / film and video / direction and
                 production",
  tableofcontents = "Introduction: Lost and found \\
                 Getting started \\
                 Animated \\
                 Pixar is born \\
                 A defining goal \\
                 Establishing Pixar's identity \\
                 Protecting the new \\
                 Honesty and candor \\
                 Fear and failure \\
                 The hungry beast and the ugly baby \\
                 Change and randomness \\
                 The hidden \\
                 Building and sustaining \\
                 Broadening our view \\
                 The unmade future \\
                 Testing what we know \\
                 A new challenge \\
                 Notes day \\
                 Afterword: The Steve we knew \\
                 Starting points: Thoughts for managing a creative
                 culture",
}

@Article{Cesareo:1946:RI,
  author =       "O. Cesareo",
  title =        "The Relay Interpolator",
  journal =      j-BELL-LABS-RECORD,
  volume =       "23",
  number =       "??",
  pages =        "457--460",
  year =         "1946",
  CODEN =        "BLRCAB",
  ISSN =         "0005-8564",
  bibdate =      "Wed Oct 13 11:31:47 2010",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  note =         "Reprinted in \cite[\S 6.2]{Randell:1982:ODC}.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@PhdThesis{Cetron:1991:CRA,
  author =       "Edward J. Cetron",
  title =        "Complexity Reduction for Analysis and Visualization of
                 Textured Electrostatic Fields",
  school =       "Department of Bioengineering, University of Utah",
  address =      "Salt Lake City, UT, USA",
  pages =        "xiii + 124",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "1991",
  bibdate =      "Sat Apr 27 07:56:07 2002",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Chabert:1999:HAH,
  editor =       "Jean-Luc Chabert and {\'E}velyne Barbin and Jacques
                 Borowczyk and Michel Guillemot and Anne Michel-Pajus
                 and Ahmed Djebbar and Jean-Claude Martzloff",
  title =        "A history of algorithms: from the pebble to the
                 microchip",
  publisher =    pub-SV,
  address =      pub-SV:adr,
  pages =        "ix + 524",
  year =         "1999",
  ISBN =         "3-540-63369-3 (softcover)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-3-540-63369-3 (softcover)",
  LCCN =         "QA58 .H5813 1998",
  bibdate =      "Mon Dec 31 17:29:07 MST 2007",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 z3950.loc.gov:7090/Voyager",
  URL =          "http://www.springer.com/west/home/math/cse?SGWID=4-10045-22-1455224-0",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  libnote =      "Not in my library.",
  remark =       "Translated from the French original ``Histoire
                 d'algorithmes. Du caillou {\`a} la puce'' (1994) by
                 Chris Weeks.",
  subject =      "algorithms; history",
  tableofcontents = "Introduction 1 \\
                 1 Algorithms for Arithmetic Operations 7 \\
                 1.1 Sumerian Division 8 \\
                 1.2 A Babylonian Algorithm for Calculating Inverses 11
                 \\
                 1.3 Egyptian Algorithms for Arithmetic 15 \\
                 1.4 Tableau Multiplication 20 \\
                 1.5 Optimising Calculations 28 \\
                 1.6 Simple Division by Difference on a Counting Board
                 30 \\
                 1.7 Division on the Chinese Abacus 35 \\
                 1.8 Numbers Written as Decimals 37 \\
                 1.9 Binary Arithmetic 40 \\
                 1.10 Computer Arithmetic 43 \\
                 Bibliography 46 \\
                 2 Magic Squares 49 \\
                 2.1 Squares with Borders 53 \\
                 2.2 The Marking Cells Method 58 \\
                 2.3 Proceeding by 2 and by 3 64 \\
                 2.4 Arnauld's Borders Method 70 \\
                 Bibliography 81 \\
                 3 Methods of False Position 83 \\
                 3.1 Mesopotamia: a Geometric False Position 86 \\
                 3.2 Egypt: Problem 26 of the Rhind Papyrus 88 \\
                 3.3 China: Chapter VII of the Jiuzhang Suanshu 91 \\
                 3.4 India: Bhaskara and the Rule of Simple False
                 Position 96 \\
                 3.5 Qusta Ibn Luqa: A Geometric Justification 98 \\
                 3.6 Ibn al-Banna: The Method of the Scales 101 \\
                 3.7 Fibonacci: the Elchatayn rule 103 \\
                 3.8 Pellos: The Rule of Three and The Method of Simple
                 False Position 106 \\
                 3.9 Clavius: Solving a System of Equations 107 \\
                 Bibliography 111 \\
                 4 Euclid's Algorithm 113 \\
                 4.1 Euclid's Algorithm 113 \\
                 4.2 Comparing Ratios 118 \\
                 4.3 B{\'e}zout's Identity 122 \\
                 4.4 Continued Fractions 126 \\
                 4.5 The Number of Roots of an Equation 132 \\
                 Bibliography 136 \\
                 5 From Measuring the Circle to Calculating 139 \\
                 Geometric Approaches 140 \\
                 5.1 The Circumference of the Circle 140 \\
                 5.2 The Area of the Circle in the Jiuzhang Suanshu 146
                 \\
                 5.3 The Method of Isoperimeters 152 \\
                 Analytic Approaches 156 \\
                 5.4 Arithmetic Quadrature 156 \\
                 5.5 Using Series 161 \\
                 5.6 Epilogue 164 \\
                 Bibliography 166 \\
                 6 Newton's Methods 169 \\
                 The Tangent Method 170 \\
                 6.1 Straight Line Approximations 170 \\
                 6.2 Recurrence Formulas 175 \\
                 6.3 Initial Conditions 178 \\
                 6.4 Measure of Convergence 183 \\
                 6.5 Complex Roots 188 \\
                 Newton's Polygon 191 \\
                 6.6 The Ruler and Small Parallelograms 191 \\
                 Bibliography 196 \\
                 7 Solving Equations by Successive Approximations 199
                 \\
                 Extraction of Square Roots 200 \\
                 7.1 The Method of Heron of Alexandria 202 \\
                 7.2 The Method of Theon of Alexandria 203 \\
                 7.3 Mediaeval Binomial Algorithms 205 \\
                 Numerical Solutions of Equations 208 \\
                 7.4 Al-Tusi's Tables 208 \\
                 7.5 Vi{\`e}te's Method 213 \\
                 7.6 Kepler's Equation 219 \\
                 7.7 Bernoulli's Method of Recurrent Series 223 \\
                 7.8 Approximation by Continued Fractions 227 \\
                 Horner like Transformations of Polynomial Equations 230
                 \\
                 7.9 The Ruffini-Budan Schema 230 \\
                 Bibliography 236 \\
                 8 Algorithms in Arithmetic 239 \\
                 Factors and Multiples 240 \\
                 8.1 The Sieve of Eratosthenes 241 \\
                 8.2 Criteria For Divisibility 243 \\
                 8.3 Quadratic Residues 248 \\
                 Tests for Primality 251 \\
                 8.4 The Converse of Fermat's Theorem 252 \\
                 8.5 The Lucas Test 256 \\
                 8.6 P{\'e}pin's Test 260 \\
                 Factorisation Algorithms 263 \\
                 8.7 Factorisation by the Difference of Two Squares 264
                 \\
                 8.8 Factorisation by Quadratic Residues 267 \\
                 8.9 Factorisation by Continued Fractions 269 \\
                 The Pell-Fermat Equation 272 \\
                 8.10 The Arithmetica of Diophantus 273 \\
                 8.11 The Lagrange Result 275 \\
                 Bibliography 280 \\
                 9 Solving Systems of Linear Equations 283 \\
                 9.1 Cramer's Rule 284 \\
                 9.2 The Method of Least Squares 287 \\
                 9.3 The Gauss Pivot Method 291 \\
                 9.4 A Gauss Iterative Method 296 \\
                 9.5 Jacobi's Method 300 \\
                 9.6 Seidel's Method 302 \\
                 9.7 Nekrasov and the Rate of Convergence 306 \\
                 9.8 Cholesky's Method 310 \\
                 9.9 Epilogue 314 \\
                 Bibliography 315 \\
                 10 Tables and Interpolation 319 \\
                 10.1 Ptolemy's Chord Tables 321 \\
                 10.2 Briggs and Decimal Logarithms 328 \\
                 10.3 The Gregory-Newton Formula 332 \\
                 10.4 Newton's Interpolation Polynomial 336 \\
                 10.5 The Lagrange Interpolation Polynomial 340 \\
                 10.6 An Error Upper Bound 345 \\
                 10.7 Neville's Algorithm 347 \\
                 Bibliography 350 \\
                 11 Approximate Quadratures 353 \\
                 11.1 Gregory's Formula 354 \\
                 11.2 Newton's Three-Eighths Rule 356 \\
                 11.3 The Newton--Cotes Formulas 357 \\
                 11.4 Stirling's Correction Formulas 359 \\
                 11.5 Simpson's Rule 362 \\
                 11.6 The Gauss Quadrature Formulas 363 \\
                 11.7 Chebyshev's Choice 367 \\
                 11.8 Epilogue 369 \\
                 Bibliography 370 \\
                 12 Approximate Solutions of Differential Equations 373
                 \\
                 12.1 Euler's Method 374 \\
                 12.2 The Existence of a Solution 378 \\
                 12.3 Runge's Methods 381 \\
                 12.4 Heun's Methods 388 \\
                 12.5 Kutta's Methods 392 \\
                 12.6 John Adams and the Use of Finite Differences 396
                 \\
                 12.7 Epilogue 401 \\
                 Bibliography 402 \\
                 13 Approximation of Functions 405 \\
                 Uniform Approximation 407 \\
                 13.1 Taylor's Formula 407 \\
                 13.2 The Lagrange Remainder 409 \\
                 13.3 Chebyshev's Polynomial of Best Approximation 412
                 \\
                 13.4 Spline-Fitting 418 \\
                 Mean Quadratic Approximation 420 \\
                 13.5 Fourier Series 422 \\
                 13.6 The Fast Fourier Transform 424 \\
                 Bibliography 427 \\
                 14 Acceleration of Convergence 429 \\
                 14.1 Stirling's Method for Series 430 \\
                 14.2 The Euler--Maclaurin Summation Formula 434 \\
                 14.3 The Euler Constant 439 \\
                 14.4 Aitken's Method 443 \\
                 14.5 Richardson's Extrapolation Method 447 \\
                 14.6 Romberg's Integration Method 451 \\
                 Bibliography 453 \\
                 15 Towards the Concept of Algorithm 455 \\
                 Recursive Functions and Computable Functions 458 \\
                 15.1 The 1931 Definition 458 \\
                 15.2 General G{\"o}del Recursive Functions 460 \\
                 15.3 Alonzo Church and Effective Calculability 462 \\
                 15.4 Recursive Functions in the Kleene Sense 466 \\
                 Machines 468 \\
                 15.5 The Turing Machine 468 \\
                 15.6 Post's Machine 474 \\
                 15.7 Conclusion 479 \\
                 Bibliography 480 \\
                 Biographies 481 \\
                 General Index 517 \\
                 Index of Names 521",
}

@Book{Chambers:CSF58-1,
  editor =       "James Pryde",
  title =        "{Chambers}'s Seven-Figure Mathematical Tables",
  volume =       "1",
  publisher =    pub-W-R-CHAMBERS,
  address =      pub-W-R-CHAMBERS:adr,
  pages =        "392",
  year =         "1958",
  LCCN =         "QA47 .P7 1958",
  bibdate =      "Tue May 12 07:43:03 1998",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  xxISBN =       "none",
}

@Book{Chambers:CSF58-2,
  editor =       "James Pryde",
  title =        "{Chambers}'s Seven-Figure Mathematical Tables",
  volume =       "2",
  publisher =    pub-W-R-CHAMBERS,
  address =      pub-W-R-CHAMBERS:adr,
  year =         "1958",
  LCCN =         "QA47 .P7 1958",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  xxISBN =       "none",
}

@Book{Chan:1998:JCLb,
  author =       "Patrick Chan and Rosanna Lee",
  title =        "The {Java} Class Libraries: {\tt java.applet}, {\tt
                 java.awt}, {\tt java.beans}",
  volume =       "2",
  publisher =    pub-AW,
  address =      pub-AW:adr,
  edition =      "Second",
  pages =        "xxix + 1682",
  year =         "1998",
  ISBN =         "0-201-31003-1",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-201-31003-0",
  LCCN =         "QA76.73.J38C47 1998",
  bibdate =      "Mon Jun 10 13:33:36 2002",
  bibsource =    "http://www.aw.com/;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  price =        "US\$54.95",
  URL =          "http://cseng.aw.com/bookdetail.qry?ISBN=0-201-31003-1;
                 http://www2.awl.com/cgi-bin/htsearch?restrict=&exclude=&config=htdig&method=boolean&format=builtin%2Dlong&words=Chan%20AND%20Lee&page=2",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  annote =       "See \cite{Chan:1999:JCLb} for vol. 1.",
}

@Book{Chan:1999:JCLb,
  author =       "Patrick Chan and Rosanna Lee and Doug Kramer",
  title =        "The {Java} Class Libraries: {\tt java.io}, {\tt
                 java.lang}, {\tt java.math}, {\tt java.net}, {\tt
                 java.text}, {\tt java.util}",
  volume =       "1",
  publisher =    pub-AW,
  address =      pub-AW:adr,
  edition =      "Second",
  pages =        "xxvi + 2050",
  year =         "1999",
  ISBN =         "0-201-31002-3",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-201-31002-3",
  LCCN =         "QA76.73.J38 C47 1998",
  bibdate =      "Mon Jun 10 13:32:26 2002",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  price =        "US\$59.99",
  abstract =     "This book is intended as a reference rather than a
                 tutorial. Its format is similar to a dictionary's in
                 that it is designed to optimize the time it takes for
                 you to look up information on a class or class
                 member.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  annote =       "See \cite{Chan:1998:JCLb} for vol. 2.",
}

@Book{Chan:1999:JCLc,
  author =       "Patrick Chan and Rosanna Lee and Douglas Kramer",
  title =        "The {Java} Class Libraries, Second Edition, Volume 1:
                 Supplement for {Java 2} Platform, Standard Edition,
                 v1.2",
  publisher =    pub-AW,
  address =      pub-AW:adr,
  pages =        "xxix + 1157",
  year =         "1999",
  ISBN =         "0-201-48552-4",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-201-48552-3",
  LCCN =         "QA76.73.J38 C47 1998",
  bibdate =      "Sat May 11 09:29:34 2002",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 http://www1.fatbrain.com/asp/bookinfo/bookinfo.asp?theisbn=0201485524",
  price =        "US\$34.95",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Char:1989:FLM,
  author =       "Bruce W. Char and others",
  title =        "First leaves for the Macintosh: a tutorial
                 introduction to Maple",
  publisher =    pub-BROOKS-COLE,
  address =      pub-BROOKS-COLE:adr,
  pages =        "xv + 140",
  year =         "1989",
  ISBN =         "0-534-10222-0",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-534-10222-7",
  LCCN =         "QA155.7.E4 F57 1989",
  bibdate =      "Wed Nov 01 08:21:24 2000",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  libnote =      "Not yet in my library.",
}

@Book{Char:1991:MLVb,
  author =       "Bruce W. Char and Keith O. Geddes and Gaston H. Gonnet
                 and Benton Leong and Michael B. Monagan and Stephen M.
                 Watt",
  title =        "{Maple Library V} Reference Manual",
  publisher =    pub-SV,
  address =      pub-SV:adr,
  pages =        "xxv + 698",
  year =         "1991",
  DOI =          "https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4757-2133-1",
  ISBN =         "0-387-97592-6, 3-540-97592-6",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-387-97592-4, 978-3-540-97592-2",
  LCCN =         "QA155.7.E4 M353 1991",
  bibdate =      "Fri Jul 08 19:01:01 1994",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/maple-extract.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/texbook2.bib",
  abstract =     "The design and implementation of the Maple system is
                 an on-going project of the Symbolic Computation Group
                 at the University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada. This
                 manual corresponds with version V (roman numeral five)
                 of the Maple system. The on-line help subsystem can be
                 invoked from within a Maple session to view
                 documentation on specific topics. In particular, the
                 command ``?updates'' points the user to documentation
                 updates for each new version of Maple. The Maple
                 project was first conceived in the autumn of 1980,
                 growing out of discussions on the state of symbolic
                 computation at the University of Waterloo. The authors
                 wish to acknowledge many fruitful discussions with
                 colleagues at the University of Waterloo, particularly
                 Morven Gentleman, Michael Malcolm, and Frank Tompa. It
                 was recognized in these discussions that none of the
                 locally-available systems for symbolic computation
                 provided the facilities that should be expected for
                 symbolic computation in modern computing environments.
                 We concluded that since the basic design decisions for
                 the then-current symbolic systems such as ALTRAN,
                 CAMAL, REDUCE, and MACSYMA were based on 1960's
                 computing technology, it would be wise to design a new
                 system ``from scratch''. Thus we could take advantage
                 of the software engineering technology which had become
                 available in recent years, as well as drawing from the
                 lessons of experience. Maple's basic features
                 (elementary data structures, Input\slash output,
                 arithmetic with numbers, and elementary simplification)
                 are coded in a systems programming language for
                 efficiency.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  tableofcontents = "The Maple Library \\
                 Main routines \\
                 Packages \\
                 Packages for discrete mathematics \\
                 Packages for applied mathematics \\
                 Packages for geometry \\
                 Miscellaneous packages",
}

@Book{Char:1991:MVLa,
  author =       "Bruce W. Char and Keith O. Geddes and Gaston H. Gonnet
                 and Benton Leong and Michael B. Monagan and Stephen M.
                 Watt",
  title =        "{Maple V}: Language Reference Manual",
  publisher =    pub-SV,
  address =      pub-SV:adr,
  pages =        "xv + 267",
  year =         "1991",
  DOI =          "https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4615-7386-9",
  ISBN =         "0-387-97622-1 (New York), 3-540-97622-1 (Berlin)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-387-97622-8 (New York), 978-3-540-97622-6
                 (Berlin)",
  LCCN =         "QA155.7.E4 M36 1991",
  bibdate =      "Wed Dec 1 12:17:05 1993",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/maple-extract.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/texbook2.bib",
  price =        "US\$24.95, FF 193,00",
  abstract =     "This book describes the Maple Symbolic Computation
                 System and the Maple V language. It describes the
                 numeric and symbolic expressions that can be used in
                 Maple V. All the basic data types, such as names,
                 polynomials, and functions, as well as structured data
                 types, are covered. The book also gives a complete
                 description of the programming language statements that
                 are provided in the Maple V system and shows how a user
                 can extend the functionality of the Maple V system by
                 adding user-defined routines. The manual also provides
                 a complete description of the Maple V system, including
                 its 2D and 3D graphics. Maple V features a newly
                 designed user interface on many systems. Separate
                 appendices describe how to use Maple V on systems using
                 the X Window System, DOS, and the Macintosh.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  shorttableofcontents = "Language elements \\
                 Statements and expressions \\
                 Data types \\
                 Type testing \\
                 Arrays and tables \\
                 Procedures \\
                 Operators \\
                 Internal representation and manipulation \\
                 Plotting \\
                 Miscellaneous facilities \\
                 Overview of the Maple Library \\
                 A. Maple under UNIX \\
                 B. Using Maple with X \\
                 C. Maple under DOS",
  tableofcontents = "1 Introduction \\
                 1.1 Some General Examples \\
                 1.2 Numbers \\
                 1.3 Examples from Calculus \\
                 1.4 Data Structures \\
                 1.5 Examples from Linear Algebra \\
                 1.6 Equation Solving \\
                 1.7 Output and Programming \\
                 2 Language Elements \\
                 2.1 Character Set \\
                 2.2 Tokens \\
                 2.3 Escape Characters \\
                 2.4 Blanks, Lines, Comments, and Continuation \\
                 2.5 Files \\
                 3 Statements and Expressions \\
                 3.1 Types of Statements \\
                 3.2 Expressions \\
                 3.3 Formal Syntax \\
                 4 Data Types \\
                 4.1 Basic Data Types \\
                 4.2 Map, Subs, and Subsop \\
                 5 Type Testing \\
                 5.1 Definition of a Type in Maple \\
                 5.2 Simple Types \\
                 5.3 Structured Types \\
                 5.4 Surface and Nested Types \\
                 5.5 Simplification of Types \\
                 5.6 Parameter Type Testing \\
                 5.7 Undesirable Simplifications and Evaluations of
                 Types \\
                 5.8 Type Testing Versus Pattern Matching \\
                 6 Arrays and Tables \\
                 6.1 Overview \\
                 6.2 Creating Tables \\
                 6.3 Evaluation Rules for Tables and Table Components
                 \\
                 6.4 Tables as Objects \\
                 6.5 Indexing Functions \\
                 7 Procedures \\
                 7.1 Procedure Definitions \\
                 7.2 Parameter Passing \\
                 7.3 Local Variables \\
                 7.4 Options \\
                 7.5 Remember Tables \\
                 7.6 Assigning Values to Parameters \\
                 7.7 Error Returns and Explicit Returns \\
                 7.8 Simplification and Returning Unevaluated \\
                 7.9 Boolean Procedures \\
                 7.10 Reading and Saving Procedures \\
                 8 Operators \\
                 8.1 Operator Definition \\
                 8.2 Syntactic Definition \\
                 8.3 Semantic Definition \\
                 8.3.1 Application Versus Composition \\
                 8.4 Partial Definition of Operators \\
                 8.5 Example: The Differentiation Operator D \\
                 9 Internal Representation and Manipulation \\
                 9.1 Internal Organization \\
                 9.2 Internal Representation of Data Types \\
                 9.3 The Use of Hashing in Maple \\
                 9.4 Portability of the Maple System \\
                 10 Plotting \\
                 10.1 Introduction \\
                 10.2 Plots in 2D \\
                 10.3 Plots in 3D \\
                 10.4 Saving Plots \\
                 10.5 Plots Package \\
                 10.6 Examples \\
                 11 Miscellaneous Facilities \\
                 11.1 Debugging Facilities: Detecting Syntax Errors \\
                 11.2 Debugging Facilities: Monitoring Run-Time
                 Execution \\
                 11.3 Alias and Macro \\
                 11.4 Monitoring Space and Time \\
                 11.5 Global Variables \\
                 11.6 User Interface Variables \\
                 11.7 Maple Command Line Options \\
                 11.8 Other Facilities \\
                 12 Overview of the Maple Library \\
                 12.1 Introduction \\
                 12.2 Description of the Maple Library \\
                 12.3 Format of Library Function Descriptions \\
                 12.4 Printing Maple Help Files \\
                 12.5 Library Index \\
                 A Maple under UNIX \\
                 A.1 Introduction \\
                 A.2 Maple Initialization Files \\
                 A.3 Quit and Interrupt Characters \\
                 A.4 Temporarily Escaping from Maple \\
                 A.5 Redirection of Input and Output \\
                 A.6 Maple Command Line Options for UNIX \\
                 A.6.1 Overview of Maple command line options \\
                 A.6.2 Library Specification Option: -b \\
                 A.6.3 Suppress Initialization Option: -s \\
                 A.6.4 Quiet Option: -q \\
                 A.7 Mint \\
                 A.8 Summary of Site- and UNIX- Dependent Aspects of
                 Maple \\
                 B Using Maple with X \\
                 B.1 Introduction \\
                 B.2 Getting Started \\
                 B.3 Entering Commands in Maple \\
                 B.4 Editing \\
                 B.5 Maple Input and Output Cells \\
                 B.6 Including and Saving Text \\
                 B.7 Searching \\
                 B.8 Resource Usage \\
                 B.9 Interrupt, Pause and Quit Buttons \\
                 B.10 Resizing Windows \\
                 B.11 Help Windows \\
                 B.12 2D Plot Windows \\
                 B.13 3D Plot Windows \\
                 B.14 Customizing Maple Under X \\
                 B.15 Tips \\
                 B.16 Troubleshooting \\
                 B.17 Information for Xperts \\
                 C Maple under DOS \\
                 C.1 Introduction \\
                 C.2 Using Maple V \\
                 C.2.1 Exiting Maple \\
                 C.2.2 The Status Line \\
                 C.2.3 The Command Line Editor \\
                 C.2.4 Expression Editing \\
                 C.2.5 File Editing \\
                 C.2.6 Accessing Maple Help \\
                 C.2.7 Session Review Mode \\
                 C.2.8 Using the Menu \\
                 C.2.9 Input/Output Capture Mode \\
                 C.3 Manipulating Graphical Output \\
                 C.3.1 Three Dimensional Graphics Display Driver \\
                 C.3.2 Two Dimensional Graphics Display Driver \\
                 C.3.3 Printing and Saving Graphic Output \\
                 C.3.4 Using Maple Plots in Other Programs",
}

@Book{Char:1992:FLT,
  author =       "Bruce W. Char and Keith O. Geddes and Gaston H. Gonnet
                 and Benton Leong and Michael B. Monagan and Stephen M.
                 Watt",
  title =        "First Leaves: a Tutorial Introduction to {Maple V}",
  publisher =    pub-SV,
  address =      pub-SV:adr,
  pages =        "xvii + 253",
  year =         "1992",
  DOI =          "https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4615-6996-1",
  ISBN =         "0-387-97621-3, 3-540-97621-3",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-387-97621-1, 978-3-540-97621-9",
  LCCN =         "QA155.7.E4 F56 1992",
  bibdate =      "Tue Nov 2 12:30:08 1993",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/maple-extract.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/texbook2.bib",
  note =         "Also available in Japanese, ISBN 4-431-70651-8",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  libnote =      "Not yet in my library.",
  tableofcontents = "One: Interactive Use of Maple \\
                 1.1: The user interface and the computational engine
                 \\
                 1.2: Getting started \\
                 1.3: Starting a Maple session: how Maple behaves
                 interactively \\
                 1.4: Simple arithmetic in Maple \\
                 1.5: Fixing mistakes \\
                 1.6: help yourself to more of Maple \\
                 1.7: Parentheses and the priority of arithmetic
                 operations \\
                 1.8: Ending a Maple session \\
                 1.9: Maple variables \\
                 1.10: Built-in commands for mathematical computation
                 \\
                 1.11: Introducing Maple's mathematical commands \\
                 1.12: Using Maple as a numerical calculator \\
                 1.13: Graphing and plotting functions on screen and on
                 paper \\
                 1.14: More about syntax errors \\
                 1.15: You ask too much! (Run-time errors) \\
                 1.16: Interrupting a Maple computation \\
                 1.17: Printing values: print and lprint \\
                 1.18: Defining simple functions in Maple \\
                 1.19: Automatic simplification \\
                 1.20: Simplifying expressions with simplify \\
                 1.21: Maple's commands for calculus \\
                 1.22: Computing sums \\
                 1.23: Solving recurrence relations with rsolve \\
                 1.24: Other commands for solving, and other
                 mathematical functions \\
                 Two: Less Simple Maple \\
                 2.1: A few words to experienced programmers \\
                 2.2: Programming variables and mathematical symbols \\
                 2.3: More on simplification: specialized simplification
                 commands \\
                 2.4: Full and delayed evaluation \\
                 2.5: Quotation and unevaluation \\
                 2.6: Using quoted variables as function arguments \\
                 2.7: Concatenation \\
                 forming new names from old \\
                 2.8: Looking at parts of expressions \\
                 op, nops, coeff \\
                 2.9: Expression sequences, sets, and lists \\
                 2.10: Tables and arrays \\
                 indexed collections of data \\
                 2.11: Converting from one structure to another \\
                 2.12: The map function: performing the same operation
                 on all elements of a data structure \\
                 2.13: Linear algebra in Maple \\
                 2.14: alias for changing the names of built-in
                 functions and mathematical symbols \\
                 2.15: Saving the state of your Maple session \\
                 2.16: Recording results in files in human-readable
                 format \\
                 2.17: Access to additional library procedures \\
                 2.18: Other formats for output: fortran, latex, and eqn
                 \\
                 Three: The Maple Programming Language \\
                 3.1: Repetition while you wait \\
                 3.2: Repetition for each one \\
                 3.3: Conditional execution with if-then-else-fi \\
                 3.4: break and next: control within for-while loops \\
                 3.5: Simple Maple procedures \\
                 3.6: Maple procedures \\
                 multiple statements, local variables, RETURN \\
                 3.7: Using error \\
                 exiting several procedures at once \\
                 3.8: Checking types: writing safer programs \\
                 3.9: Nested types and structured types \\
                 3.10: Remembering function values \\
                 3.11: Functional operators \\
                 3.12: Packages in Maple \\
                 3.13: Your Maple initialization file \\
                 3.14: Creating help for your procedures \\
                 3.15: Creating your own library \\
                 3.16: Creating and debugging Maple programs \\
                 3.17: Viewing Maple library source code \\
                 3.18: Calling Maple from programs written in other
                 languages \\
                 Four: Advanced Graphics \\
                 4.1: More on plot \\
                 4.2: Plotting in three dimensions: graphing surfaces
                 \\
                 4.3: Plotting functional expressions with plot and
                 plot3d \\
                 Five: Measuring and improving performance \\
                 5.1: Monitoring time and space consumed during a
                 computation \\
                 5.2: Garbage collection and gc \\
                 5.3: Querying the state of the system through status
                 \\
                 5.4: Profiling the performance of Maple programs \\
                 5.5: Using option remember to improve performance \\
                 5.6: Faster floating-point computation \\
                 Six: Advanced Examples \\
                 6.1: Introduction \\
                 6.2: Balancing chemical reactions \\
                 6.3: Maxwell's formula for the velocity of a gas sample
                 \\
                 6.4: Critical length of a rod \\
                 6.5: Zeros of Bessel functions \\
                 6.6: Stock market analysis through linear algebra \\
                 6.7: Primitive trinomials \\
                 6.8: Computations on the 3n +1 conjecture \\
                 6.9: A numerical approximation problem \\
                 6.10: Reading more about Maple problem-solving
                 techniques \\
                 Seven: Global access to Maple information \\
                 7.1: New users' problems \\
                 7.2: The community of Maple users \\
                 7.3: What to do when the answer seems wrong \\
                 7.4: Electronic access to user-contributed Maple
                 software \\
                 7.5: Maple publications \\
                 Conclusion \\
                 A: Bibliography \\
                 B: Books and articles for Maple users \\
                 B.1: Some books for Maple users \\
                 B.2: Some research articles on Maple and its usage",
}

@Book{Chasen:1978:GPP,
  author =       "Sylvan H. Chasen",
  title =        "Geometric Principles and Procedures for Computer
                 Graphics Applications",
  publisher =    pub-PH,
  address =      pub-PH:adr,
  pages =        "xiv + 241",
  year =         "1978",
  ISBN =         "0-13-352559-7",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-13-352559-5",
  LCCN =         "T385 .C46",
  bibdate =      "Tue Dec 14 23:27:35 1993",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Chassell:1999:TGD,
  author =       "Robert J. Chassell and Richard M. Stallman",
  title =        "{Texinfo}: The {GNU} Documentation Format (for
                 {Texinfo} version 4.0, {28 September 1999})",
  publisher =    pub-FSF,
  address =      pub-FSF:adr,
  pages =        "x + 244",
  year =         "1999",
  ISBN =         "1-882114-67-1",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-1-882114-67-2",
  LCCN =         "QA76.76.T49 C53 1999",
  bibdate =      "Wed Sep 20 10:17:03 2000",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  price =        "US\$25.00",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Chen:2002:GGS,
  author =       "Jim X. Chen",
  title =        "Guide to Graphics Software Tools",
  publisher =    pub-SV,
  address =      pub-SV:adr,
  pages =        "xxiv + 503",
  year =         "2002",
  ISBN =         "0-387-95049-4 (hardcover), 0-585-47254-8,
                 0-387-22430-0 (e-book)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-387-95049-5 (hardcover), 978-0-585-47254-6,
                 978-0-387-22430-5 (e-book)",
  LCCN =         "T385 .C473 2003",
  bibdate =      "Sat Aug 02 09:19:58 2003",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  note =         "Includes CD-ROM.",
  price =        "US\$59.95",
  abstract =     "Today, graphics software tools open up new areas and
                 form into different combinations of multiple functions.
                 Learning graphics programming is time consuming, and
                 the many new graphics tools might seem overwhelming. If
                 we know how graphics work and what basic functions the
                 graphics tools provide, we can understand and employ
                 some of the tools without spending much precious time
                 to learn all the details that may not be applicable.
                 There are many books on graphics principles and
                 practice already. However, there is no book available
                 as a helpful entry point on widely used graphics
                 software tools for specialists and nonspecialists
                 alike. Today, many scientists in different disciplines
                 realize the power of graphics, but are also bewildered
                 by the numerous graphics tools. More often than not,
                 they choose the improper software tools and end up with
                 unsatisfactory results. This book introduces and
                 categorizes the most commonly used graphics tools and
                 their applications. The purpose is not to provide an
                 exhausting list of tools and their explicit functions,
                 but instead to provide scientific researchers different
                 means and application areas in computer graphics, and
                 help to efficiently use visualization, modeling,
                 simulation, and virtual reality to complement their
                 research needs. The guide will include coverage of the
                 most widely used commercial software, freeware and
                 open-source software.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  libnote =      "Not yet in my library.",
  tableofcontents = "Preface \\
                 Table of Contents \\
                 1: Objects and Models \\
                 2: Transformation and Viewing \\
                 3: Color and Lighting \\
                 4: Blending and Texture Mapping \\
                 5: Advanced Topics \\
                 6: Low-Level Graphics Libraries \\
                 7: Visualization \\
                 8: Modeling and Rendering \\
                 9: Animation and Simulation \\
                 10: Virtual Reality \\
                 11: Web3D Tools and Networked Environment \\
                 12: 3D File Formats \\
                 Appendix: Graphics Software Tools",
}

@Article{Chen:SPE-19-9-897,
  author =       "Pehong Chen and Michael A. Harrison",
  title =        "Index Preparation and Processing",
  journal =      j-SPE,
  volume =       "19",
  number =       "9",
  pages =        "897--915",
  month =        sep,
  year =         "1988",
  bibdate =      "Sun May 2 07:46:42 1999",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  note =         "The {\LaTeX} text of this paper is included in the
                 {\tt makeindex} software distribution. See
                 \cite{Chen:UCB-TR-87-347}.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@TechReport{Chen:UCB-TR-87-347,
  author =       "Pehong Chen and Michael A. Harrison",
  title =        "Automating Index Preparation",
  type =         "Technical Report",
  number =       "87/347",
  institution =  "Computer Science Division, University of California",
  address =      "Berkeley, CA, USA",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "1987",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  note =         "This is an expanded version of
                 \cite{Chen:SPE-19-9-897}.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Cheswick:1994:FIS,
  author =       "William R. Cheswick and Steven M. Bellovin",
  title =        "Firewalls and Internet Security: Repelling the Wily
                 Hacker",
  publisher =    pub-AW,
  address =      pub-AW:adr,
  pages =        "xiv + 306",
  year =         "1994",
  ISBN =         "0-201-63357-4",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-201-63357-3",
  LCCN =         "TK5105.875.I57C44 1994",
  bibdate =      "Wed May 18 19:08:21 1994",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/internet.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/unix.bib",
  price =        "US\$24.95",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  tableofcontents = "1: Introduction \\
                 2: An Overview of TCP/IP \\
                 3: Firewall Gateways \\
                 4: How to Build an Application-Level Gateway \\
                 5: Authentication \\
                 6: Gateway Tools \\
                 7: Traps, Lures, and Honey Pots \\
                 8: The Hacker's Workbench \\
                 9: Classes of Attacks \\
                 10: An Evening with Berferd \\
                 11: Where the Wild Things Are: A Look at the Logs \\
                 12: Legal Considerations \\
                 13: Secure Communications over Insecure Networks \\
                 14: Where Do We Go from Here? \\
                 A: Useful Free Stuff \\
                 B: TCP and UDP Ports \\
                 C: Recommendations to Vendors",
}

@Book{Cheswick:2003:FIS,
  author =       "William R. Cheswick and Steven M. Bellovin and Aviel
                 D. Rubin",
  title =        "Firewalls and {Internet} Security: Repelling the Wily
                 Hacker",
  publisher =    pub-AW,
  address =      pub-AW:adr,
  edition =      "Second",
  pages =        "xiv + 433",
  year =         "2003",
  ISBN =         "0-201-63466-X",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-201-63466-2",
  LCCN =         "TK5105.875.I57C44 2003",
  bibdate =      "Mon Mar 10 05:40:10 2003",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  price =        "US\$49.99, CAN\$77.99",
  abstract =     "Focusing on Unix network security, this guide reviews
                 the TCP/IP protocol suite, identifies the techniques
                 used to attack hosts and networks, and evaluates
                 authentication tools, types of firewalls, and filtering
                 services. The second edition adds chapters on the
                 problems and practices of modern intranets, and the
                 variety of intrusion detection systems.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  tableofcontents = "I: Getting Started \\
                 1: Introduction \\
                 2: A Security Review of Protocols: Lower Layers \\
                 3: Security Review: The Upper Layers \\
                 4: The Web: Threat or Menace? \\
                 II: The Threats \\
                 5: Classes of Attacks \\
                 6: The Hacker's Workbench, and Other Munitions \\
                 III: Safer Tools and Services \\
                 7: Authentication \\
                 8: Using Some Tools and Services \\
                 IV: Firewalls and VPNs \\
                 9: Kinds of Firewalls \\
                 10: Filtering Services \\
                 11: Firewall Engineering \\
                 12: Tunneling and VPNs \\
                 V: Protecting an Organization \\
                 13: Network Layout \\
                 14: Safe Hosts in a Hostile Environment \\
                 15: Instruction Detection \\
                 VI: Lessons Learned \\
                 16: An Evening with Berferd \\
                 17: The Taking of Clark",
}

@Book{Chow:1989:MXR,
  editor =       "Paul Chow",
  title =        "The {MIPS-X RISC} Microprocessor",
  publisher =    pub-KLUWER,
  address =      pub-KLUWER:adr,
  pages =        "xxiv + 231",
  year =         "1989",
  ISBN =         "0-7923-9045-8",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-7923-9045-9",
  LCCN =         "QA76.8.M524 M57 1989",
  bibdate =      "Tue Dec 14 23:27:43 1993",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/fparith.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/microchip.bib",
  series =       "The Kluwer international series in engineering and
                 computer science",
  ZMnumber =     "0706.68010",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  keywords =     "MIPS-X (microprocessor); VLSI, computer architecture,
                 and digital signal processing SECS 81",
}

@Book{Chposky:1988:BMP,
  author =       "James Chposky and Ted Leonsis",
  title =        "Blue magic: the people, power, and politics behind the
                 {IBM} personal computer",
  publisher =    "Facts on File",
  address =      "New York, NY, USA",
  pages =        "xi + 228",
  year =         "1988",
  ISBN =         "0-8160-1391-8",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-8160-1391-3",
  LCCN =         "HD9696.C64 I4832 1988",
  bibdate =      "Fri Jan 24 07:03:11 MST 2014",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 z3950.loc.gov:7090/Voyager",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  libnote =      "Not in my library.",
  subject =      "IBM microcomputers; History; IBM Personal Computer",
  tableofcontents = "The vixen and the rocket \\
                 Putting a toe in the water",
}

@Book{Christensen:1997:IDW,
  author =       "Clayton M. Christensen",
  title =        "The innovator's dilemma: when new technologies cause
                 great firms to fail",
  publisher =    "Harvard Business School",
  address =      "Boston, MA, USA",
  pages =        "xxiv + 225",
  year =         "1997",
  ISBN =         "0-87584-585-1",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-87584-585-2",
  LCCN =         "HD53 .C49 1997",
  bibdate =      "Thu Dec 28 07:47:15 MST 2017",
  bibsource =    "fsz3950.oclc.org:210/WorldCat;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  series =       "The Management of Innovation and Change Series",
  abstract =     "This book takes the radical position that great
                 companies can fail precisely because they do everything
                 right. It demonstrates why outstanding companies that
                 had their competitive antennae up, listened astutely to
                 customers, and invested aggressively in new
                 technologies still lost their market leadership when
                 confronted with disruptive changes in technology and
                 market structure. And it tells how to avoid a similar
                 fate. Using the lessons of successes and failures of
                 leading companies, The \booktitle{Innovator's Dilemma}
                 presents a set of rules for capitalizing on the
                 phenomenon of disruptive innovation. These principles
                 will help managers determine when it is right not to
                 listen to customers, when to invest in developing
                 lower-performance products that promise lower margins,
                 and when to pursue small markets at the expense of
                 seemingly larger and more lucrative ones.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  libnote =      "Not in my library.",
  tableofcontents = "How can great firms fail? Insights from the hard
                 disk drive industry \\
                 Value networks and the impetus to innovate \\
                 Disruptive technological change in the mechanical
                 excavator industry \\
                 What goes up, can't go down \\
                 Give responsibility for disruptive technologies to
                 organizations whose customers need them \\
                 Match the size of the organization to the size of the
                 market \\
                 Discovering new and emerging markets \\
                 Performance provided, market demand, and the product
                 life cycle \\
                 Managing disruptive technological change: a case study
                 \\
                 The dilemmas of innovation: a summary",
}

@Book{Christian:1983:UOS,
  author =       "Kaare Christian",
  title =        "The {UNIX} Operating System",
  publisher =    pub-WILEY-INTERSCIENCE,
  address =      pub-WILEY-INTERSCIENCE:adr,
  pages =        "xviii + 318",
  year =         "1983",
  ISBN =         "0-471-87542-2 (hardcover) and 0-471-89052-9
                 (paperback)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-471-87542-0 (hardcover) and 978-0-471-89052-2
                 (paperback)",
  LCCN =         "QA76.8.U65 C45 1983",
  bibdate =      "Tue Dec 14 23:28:00 1993",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Christian:1986:GM,
  author =       "Kaare Christian",
  title =        "A Guide to {Modula-2}",
  publisher =    pub-SV,
  address =      pub-SV:adr,
  pages =        "xix + 436",
  year =         "1986",
  ISBN =         "0-387-96242-5",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-387-96242-9",
  LCCN =         "QA76.73.M63 C494 1986",
  bibdate =      "Tue Dec 14 23:27:52 1993",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  price =        "US\$28.00",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Christian:1988:UOS,
  author =       "Kaare Christian",
  title =        "The {UNIX} Operating System",
  publisher =    pub-WILEY-INTERSCIENCE,
  address =      pub-WILEY-INTERSCIENCE:adr,
  edition =      "Second",
  pages =        "xxii + 455",
  year =         "1988",
  ISBN =         "0-471-84782-8 (hardcover), 0-471-84781-X (paperback)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-471-84782-3 (hardcover), 978-0-471-84781-6
                 (paperback)",
  LCCN =         "QA76.8.U65 C45 1988",
  bibdate =      "Tue Dec 14 23:28:05 1993",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/unix.bib",
  abstract =     "Contains over 50 percent new and expanded material and
                 guides readers through every aspect of UNIX--from basic
                 commands to shell programming to systems
                 administration. Provides readers with useful quick
                 summary sections that explain the important differences
                 between UNIX versions. Includes special chapters on
                 networking, security and Window systems.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  tableofcontents = "The History of the UNIX System \\
                 Fundamentals \\
                 UNIX System Basics \\
                 Entering Commands Using the Shell \\
                 The UNIX File System \\
                 Managing Your Files \\
                 What's Going on Utilities \\
                 Text File Utilities \\
                 Basic Text Editing with Vi \\
                 Advanced Text Editing with Vi \\
                 The Bourne Shell Programming Language \\
                 A Few Shell Programs \\
                 The AWK Programming Language \\
                 The Sed Text Editor \\
                 UNIX Platforms \\
                 Window Systems \\
                 Networking \\
                 LAN Networking Utilities \\
                 UUCP Networking Utilities \\
                 System Management \\
                 System Management Utilities \\
                 Security \\
                 The UNIX System Kernel \\
                 Appendices \\
                 Index",
  xxnote =       "See \cite{Sobell:1989:PGU}.",
}

@Book{Christiansen:1998:PC,
  author =       "Tohm Christiansen and Nathan Torkington",
  title =        "Perl Cookbook: Solutions and examples for {Perl}
                 programmers",
  publisher =    pub-ORA,
  address =      pub-ORA:adr,
  pages =        "xxxiv + 757",
  year =         "1998",
  ISBN =         "1-56592-243-3",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-1-56592-243-3",
  LCCN =         "QA76.73.P22 C57 1998",
  bibdate =      "Thu Feb 18 06:53:00 1999",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  price =        "US\$39.95",
  URL =          "http://www.oreilly.com/catalog/cookbook/",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Chroskova:1993:ACC,
  author =       "Blank Chroskov{\'a} and Bohumila Navr{\'a}tilov{\'a}
                 and Milo{\v{s}} Vantuch and Eva Hrabcov{\'a}",
  title =        "Anglicko--{\v{C}}esk{\'y} a {\v{C}}esko--Anglick{\'y}
                 Slovn{\'\i}k --- English--Czech and Czech--English
                 Dictionary",
  publisher =    "Vydavatelstv{\'\i} Montan{\v{e}}x",
  address =      "Ostrava, Czechoslovakia",
  pages =        "176",
  year =         "1993",
  ISBN =         "80-85300-57-5",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-80-85300-57-4",
  LCCN =         "PG4640 .A485 1993x",
  bibdate =      "Sat Dec 24 15:19:10 2005",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  idnumber =     "519",
  remark =       "No publication year in book; WorldCat says 1993.",
  subject =      "Czech language; Dictionaries; English; English
                 language; Czech",
}

@Book{Churchill:1958:OM,
  author =       "Ruel V. Churchill",
  title =        "Operational Mathematics",
  publisher =    pub-MCGRAW-HILL,
  address =      pub-MCGRAW-HILL:adr,
  edition =      "Second",
  pages =        "337",
  year =         "1958",
  LCCN =         "QA432 .C45 1958",
  bibdate =      "Wed Dec 15 15:37:25 1993",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  xxISBN =       "none",
}

@Book{Churchill:1960:CVA,
  author =       "Ruel V. Churchill",
  title =        "Complex Variables and Applications",
  publisher =    pub-MCGRAW-HILL,
  address =      pub-MCGRAW-HILL:adr,
  edition =      "Second",
  pages =        "297",
  year =         "1960",
  LCCN =         "QA331 .C45 1960",
  bibdate =      "Wed Dec 15 15:35:45 1993",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  xxISBN =       "none",
}

@Book{Clark:1985:MPP,
  author =       "K. L. Clark and F. G. McCabe",
  title =        "micro-{PROLOG}: Programming in Logic",
  publisher =    pub-PHI,
  address =      pub-PHI:adr,
  pages =        "xi + 401",
  year =         "1985",
  ISBN =         "0-13-581264-X (paperback)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-13-581264-8 (paperback)",
  LCCN =         "QA76.73.M5 C55 1984",
  bibdate =      "Tue Dec 14 23:28:16 1993",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  price =        "US\$17.95",
  series =       "Series in Computer Science, Editor: C. A. R. Hoare",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  tableofcontents = "Basic concepts \\
                 Facts and queries \\
                 Rules \\
                 Lists \\
                 Logic programming using micro-Prolog \\
                 Complex conditions in queries and rules \\
                 List processing \\
                 Introduction to parsing \\
                 Some pragmatic considerations \\
                 Metalogical programming \\
                 Core micro-Prolog \\
                 The standard syntax of micro-Prolog \\
                 Applications of micro-Prolog \\
                 A critical path analysis program \\
                 Micro-Prolog for expert systems \\
                 The logic of two person games \\
                 Micro-Prolog for problem solving \\
                 Index",
}

@Book{Clark:1992:PTP,
  author =       "Malcolm Clark",
  title =        "A Plain {\TeX} Primer",
  publisher =    pub-OXFORD,
  address =      pub-OXFORD:adr,
  pages =        "481",
  year =         "1992",
  ISBN =         "0-19-853784-0 (hardcover), 0-19-853724-7 (paperback)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-19-853784-7 (hardcover), 978-0-19-853724-3
                 (paperback)",
  LCCN =         "Z253.4.T47 C46 1992",
  bibdate =      "Tue Dec 14 23:41:37 1993",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  abstract =     "This outstanding introductory primer demystifies and
                 explains \TeX{}, an advanced and widely popular
                 typesetting and page make-up system that is especially
                 designed to facilitate scientific and technical
                 publishing. The \TeX{} system is highly versatile,
                 designed for use on over 50 different types of
                 personal, mini-, and mainframe computers. The book
                 immediately provides the reader with sufficient
                 information to begin the majority of tasks which he or
                 she most likely wishes to tackle. Accessibly written at
                 an introductory level, the book explains how
                 high-quality results can be obtained by someone with
                 only a little \TeX{} background. In a straightforward
                 manner, it details why \TeX{} approaches its subject in
                 the way it does, and provides the ``context'' into
                 which it fits. Special emphasis is placed on document
                 structure and practical work. In fact, not only is this
                 book a ``primer,'' but it is a ``plain'' \TeX{} primer.
                 Wherever \TeX{} is running, it comes with at least one
                 basic style definition, called ``plain''. Plain \TeX{}
                 is the common starting point for \TeX{} users and can
                 be extended or modified to suit individual needs. Thus,
                 with the aid of this book, scientists and researchers
                 preparing their own books and papers, or technical
                 typists used to the conventions and jargon of their
                 field, will find little difficulty in adopting \TeX{}'s
                 approach. Students and professionals involved in
                 document preparation or desk-top publishing will also
                 find this an extremely useful volume.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  subject =      "TeX (Computer file); TeX (Computer file); Computerized
                 typesetting; Mathematics printing; Computer programs;
                 Computerized typesetting; Computer programs; Linguagens
                 De Programa{\c{c}}ao (Codifica{\c{c}}ao); TeX
                 (logiciel)",
  tableofcontents = "1. Introduction \\
                 2. Getting started \\
                 3. Do it yourself \\
                 4. Beginning mathematics \\
                 5. Continuing mathematics \\
                 6. More words \\
                 7. Commands \\
                 8. More maths \\
                 9. Boxing \\
                 10. Commands\#1 \\
                 11. Matrix manipulations \\
                 12. Pages \\
                 13. Tables by tabs \\
                 14. Tables again \\
                 15. Rules \\
                 16. Further rules \\
                 17. Graphics \\
                 18. Fonts \\
                 19. More detailed fonts \\
                 20. Making pages \\
                 21. Breaking up \\
                 22. Delays and deferments \\
                 23. Collections \\
                 24. Last words \\
                 A. Fonts \\
                 B. Annotated bibliography and references",
}

@Book{Clark:2009:SKU,
  author =       "Stuart (Stuart G.) Clark",
  title =        "The {Sun Kings}: the unexpected tragedy of {Richard
                 Carrington} and the tale of how modern astronomy
                 began",
  publisher =    pub-PRINCETON,
  address =      pub-PRINCETON:adr,
  pages =        "xii + 211",
  year =         "2009",
  ISBN =         "0-691-14126-6 (paperback)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-691-14126-8 (paperback)",
  LCCN =         "M09.E06300",
  bibdate =      "Thu Nov 12 16:40:25 MST 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/physperspect.bib;
                 library.ox.ac.uk:210/ADVANCE",
  URL =          "http://press.princeton.edu/titles/8370.html",
  abstract =     "Recounts the story behind English astronomer Richard
                 Carrington's observations of a mysterious explosion on
                 the surface of the sun and how his understanding that
                 the sun's magnetism directly influences the Earth
                 helped usher in the modern era of astronomy.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  remark =       "Originally published: 2007.",
  subject =      "Carrington, Richard Christopher; astronomy; England;
                 19th Century history; solar flares; observations; sun;
                 Carrington, Richard Christopher; Herschel, William,
                 Sir; Herschel, John F. W (John Frederick William), Sir;
                 Maunder, E. Walter (Edward Walter); Hale, George
                 Ellery; Carrington, Richard Christopher; Herschel,
                 William; Herschel, John Frederick William; Maunder,
                 Edward Walter; Hale, George Ellery; Astronomers; Great
                 Britain; Biography; Solar flares; Observations;
                 History; 19th century; Astronomes; Grande-Bretagne;
                 Biographies; {\'E}ruptions solaires; 19e si{\`e}cle;
                 Soleil; Sun; 19th century",
  subject-dates = "Richard Carrington (1826--1875); Sir William Herschel
                 (1738--1822); John F. W. Herschel (1792--1871); E.
                 Walter Maunder (1851--1928); George Ellery Hale
                 (1868--1938)",
  tableofcontents = "List of Illustrations / ix \\
                 Acknowledgments / xi \\
                 Prologue: The Dog Years / 1 \\
                 Chapter One: The First Swallow of Summer / 9 \\
                 Chapter Two: Herschel's Grand Absurdity / 25 \\
                 Chapter Three: The Magnetic Crusade / 47 \\
                 Chapter Four: The Solar Lockstep / 58 \\
                 Chapter Five: The Day and Night Observatory / 71 \\
                 Chapter Six: The Perfect Solar Storm / 80 \\
                 Chapter Seven: In the Grip of the Sun / 93 \\
                 Chapter Eight: The Greatest Prize of All / 98 \\
                 Chapter Nine: Death at the Devil's Jumps / 117 \\
                 Chapter Ten: The Sun's Librarian / 129 \\
                 Chapter Eleven: New Flare, New Storm, New Understanding
                 / 148 \\
                 Chapter Twelve: The Waiting Game / 168 \\
                 Chapter Thirteen: The Cloud Chamber / 179 \\
                 Epilogue: Magnetar Spring / 188 \\
                 Bibliography / 191 \\
                 Index / 207",
}

@Book{Clawson:1994:MTE,
  author =       "Calvin C. Clawson",
  title =        "The Mathematical Traveler: Exploring the Grand History
                 of Numbers",
  publisher =    pub-PLENUM,
  address =      pub-PLENUM:adr,
  pages =        "x + 307",
  year =         "1994",
  ISBN =         "0-306-44645-6",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-306-44645-0",
  LCCN =         "QA141 .C52 1994",
  bibdate =      "Wed Dec 31 11:51:02 1997",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/pi.bib",
  price =        "US\$25.95",
  abstract =     "The story of numbers is a rich, sweeping history that
                 shows how our mathematical achievements contributed to
                 the greatest innovations of civilization. Calvin
                 Clawson, acclaimed author of \booktitle{Conquering Math
                 Phobia}, weaves a story of numbers that spans thousands
                 of years. As Clawson so clearly shows, numbers are not
                 only an intrinsic and essential thread in our modern
                 lives, but have always been an integral part of the
                 human psyche --- knit into the very fabric of our
                 identity as humans. Clawson travels back through time
                 to the roots of the history of numbers. In exploring
                 early human fascination with numbers, he unearths the
                 clay beads, knotted ropes, and tablets used by our
                 ancestors as counting tools. He then investigates how
                 numeric symbols and concepts developed uniquely and
                 independently in Meso-America, China, and Egypt. As he
                 persuasively argues, the mathematical concepts that
                 arose and flourished in the ancient world enabled the
                 creation of architectural masterpieces as well as the
                 establishment of vast trade networks. Continuing the
                 journey, Clawson brings us to the elegant logic of
                 numbers that soon came to distinguish itself as a
                 discipline and the language of science. From the
                 concepts of infinity contemplated by the Greeks to the
                 complex numbers that are indispensable to scientists on
                 the cutting edge of research today, Clawson breathes
                 life and meaning into the history of great mathematical
                 mysteries and problems. In this spirit of inquiry, he
                 explores, in their times and places, the discovery of
                 numbers that lie outside the province of counting,
                 including irrational numbers, transcendentals, complex
                 numbers, and the enormous transfinite numbers. The
                 personalities and the creative feats surrounding each
                 mathematical invention come alive vividly in Clawson's
                 lucid prose. In this work of breathtaking scope,
                 Clawson guides us through the wonders of numbers and
                 illustrates their monumental impact on civilization.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  subject =      "Numeration; Counting; Counting; Numeration;
                 Getaltheorie; Geschichte; Zahlentheorie",
  tableofcontents = "Acknowledgments / vii \\
                 Introduction / 1 \\
                 1: How Do We Count? / 5 \\
                 2: Early Counting / 19 \\
                 3: Counting in Other Species: How Smart Are They? / 37
                 \\
                 4: Ancient Numbers / 49 \\
                 5: Chinese and New World Numbers / 77 \\
                 6: Problems in Paradise / 95 \\
                 7: The Negative Numbers / 121 \\
                 8: Dealing with the Infinite / 135 \\
                 9: Dedekind's Cut: Irrational Numbers / 161 \\
                 10: Story of $\pi$: Transcendental Numbers / 181 \\
                 11: Expanding the Kingdom: Complex Numbers / 207 \\
                 12: Really Big: Transfinite Numbers / 223 \\
                 13: The Genius Calculators / 233 \\
                 14: What Does It All Mean? / 247 \\
                 15: Numbers: Past, Present, and Future / 263 \\
                 End Notes / 281 \\
                 Glossary / 289 \\
                 Bibliography / 299 \\
                 Index / 303",
}

@Book{Cleaveland:1977:GPL,
  author =       "J. Craig Cleaveland and Robert C. Uzgalis",
  title =        "Grammars for Programming Languages",
  volume =       "4",
  publisher =    pub-ELSEVIER,
  address =      pub-ELSEVIER:adr,
  pages =        "xiii + 154",
  year =         "1977",
  ISBN =         "0-444-00187-5 (hardcover), 0-444-00199-9 (paperback)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-444-00187-0 (hardcover), 978-0-444-00199-3
                 (paperback)",
  LCCN =         "QA76.7.C571",
  bibdate =      "Tue Dec 14 23:28:27 1993",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  series =       "Programming Languages Series, Editor: Thomas E.
                 Cheatham",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Clegg:2003:BHI,
  author =       "Brian Clegg",
  title =        "A Brief History of Infinity: The Quest to Think the
                 Unthinkable",
  publisher =    "Robinson",
  address =      "London, UK",
  pages =        "255",
  year =         "2003",
  ISBN =         "1-84119-650-9",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-1-84119-650-3",
  LCCN =         "BD411 .C57 2003",
  bibdate =      "Wed Nov 26 05:33:08 2003",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  price =        "UK\pounds 8.99",
  abstract =     "Infinity is a concept that fascinates everyone from a
                 seven-year-old child to a maths professor. So
                 remarkable and strange is it that contemplating it has
                 driven at least two great mathematicians over the edge
                 into insanity. Where did the concept of infinity come
                 from? Who were the people who originally defined and
                 later refined this paradoxical quantity? Why is
                 infinity, a concept we can never experience or truly
                 grasp, at the heart of science? How can some infinities
                 be bigger than others? An exploration of the most
                 mind-boggling feature of maths and physics, this work
                 examines amazing paradoxes, for example Hilbert's
                 Hotel. This imaginary resort has an infinite number of
                 rooms, which all happen to be occupied. Unfortunately
                 an endless coach turns up carrying an infinite number
                 of new guests. It's not a problem though --- it's easy
                 to prove they can all be accommodated. The book also
                 looks at: the people who devised and refined the
                 concept, the many mind-bending paradoxes of infinity,
                 infinity's place at the heart of mathematics and
                 science in processes such as calculus, how dividing by
                 zero brings infinity into view and infinity and
                 cosmos.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Clegg:2009:BBB,
  author =       "Brian Clegg",
  title =        "Before the {Big Bang}: the prehistory of our
                 universe",
  publisher =    "St. Martin's Press",
  address =      "New York, NY, USA",
  pages =        "306",
  year =         "2009",
  ISBN =         "0-312-38547-1",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-312-38547-7",
  LCCN =         "QB981 .C627 2009",
  bibdate =      "Mon Jun 13 16:38:13 MDT 2011",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 z3950.loc.gov:7090/Voyager",
  URL =          "http://www.loc.gov/catdir/enhancements/fy0908/2008046035-b.html;
                 http://www.loc.gov/catdir/enhancements/fy0908/2008046035-d.html",
  abstract =     "Explores the history of the big bang theory while
                 considering the myriad beliefs about what may have
                 compelled it, providing coverage of such topics as
                 creation myths, the discovery of other galaxies, and
                 ongoing debates about black holes.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  subject =      "Cosmology; Big bang theory",
  tableofcontents = "Big bang primer \\
                 Enter the creator \\
                 What and how big? \\
                 How old? \\
                 A bang or a whimper? \\
                 Keeping things steady \\
                 Inflating the truth \\
                 Let there be time \\
                 Groundhog universe \\
                 Living in a bubble \\
                 Welcome to the matrix \\
                 Snapshot universe",
}

@Book{Clews:1988:LAW,
  author =       "John Clews",
  title =        "Language automation worldwide: the development of
                 character set standards",
  number =       "5962",
  publisher =    "SESAME Computer Projects",
  address =      "Harrogate, North Yorkshire, UK",
  pages =        "104",
  year =         "1988",
  ISBN =         "1-870095-01-4",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-1-870095-01-3",
  LCCN =         "QA76.5 .C54 1988",
  bibdate =      "Mon Jul 21 09:08:40 1997",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/unicode.bib",
  series =       "British Library R \& D reports",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  libnote =      "Not in my library.",
  tableofcontents = "Abstract / iii \\
                 Acknowledgements / iii \\
                 Introduction / 1 \\
                 1. Coded Character Sets, Scripts and Standards in
                 Library Automation / 4 \\
                 1.1 Scripts / 8 \\
                 1.2 Standards / 12 \\
                 1.3 International Standards / 12 \\
                 1.3.1 The standardization process / 12 \\
                 1.3.2 The scope and origins of ISO / 13 \\
                 1.3.3 National members of ISO / 13 \\
                 1.3.4 The Technical Committee structure within ISO / 15
                 \\
                 1.3.5 Liaison members / 15 \\
                 1.3.6 ISO Technical Committee 97 / 16 \\
                 1.3.7 ISO Technical Committee 46 / 16 \\
                 1.4 National Standards / 19 \\
                 1.5 De facto Standards - / 19 \\
                 1.6 Industry Standards / 20 \\
                 2. Roman Script Character Sets: Accommodating
                 Additional Characters / 21 \\
                 2.1 Substitution / 21 \\
                 2.2 Control Functions Related to Code Extension
                 Techniques / 22 \\
                 2.3 Escape sequences: ISO 2022, ISO 2375 and the
                 International Register / 25 \\
                 2.4 Registration / 26 \\
                 2.5 Non-standard Uses of Escape Sequences in Library
                 Systems / 26 \\
                 2.5.1 Escape sequences in UNIMARC / 28 \\
                 2.5.2 Escape sequences in USMARC and related exchange
                 formats / 29 \\
                 3. Graphic Character Sets for Libraries / 31 \\
                 3.1 USMARC / 31 \\
                 3.2 National Variants of USMARC / 35 \\
                 3.3 EBCDIC / 36 \\
                 3.4 Bibliographic Uses of EBCDIC / 37 \\
                 3.5 Latin Alphabet Character Sets of IS0/TC46 / 39 \\
                 3.6 ISO 5426 / 42 \\
                 3.7 ISO 6438 - African Character Set / 44 \\
                 3.8 International Phonetic Alphabet Character Set / 46
                 \\
                 3.9 ISO 6862 (Mathematical Symbols) / 49 \\
                 4. 8 bit Graphic Character Sets Developed by
                 ISO/TC97/SC2 / 50 \\
                 4.1 ISO 4873 / 50 \\
                 4.2 ISO 6937 / 52 \\
                 4.3 ISO 8859 / 56 \\
                 4.4 Future Development of 8-bit Codes / 63 \\
                 5. Character Set Standards for Other European Scripts /
                 64 \\
                 5.1 ISO/TC97 Character Sets for Cyrillic Script / 65
                 \\
                 5.2 ISO/TC46 Character Sets for Cyrillic Script / 74
                 \\
                 5.3 Non-Slavonic Cyrillic Character Sets / 74 \\
                 5.4 Character Sets for American and Georgian / 74 \\
                 5.5 ISO/TC97 Character Sets for Greek Script / 88 \\
                 5.6 ISO/TC46 Character Sets for Greek Script / 88 \\
                 5.7 Duplication of Effort Within ISO / 88 \\
                 6. Character Sets for North African and Middle Eastern
                 Scripts / 93 \\
                 6.1 Hebrew Script / 93 \\
                 6.2 Arabic Script / 98 \\
                 6.3 Maldivian Script / 105 \\
                 6.4 Amharic Script / 107 \\
                 7. Character Sets for South Asian Scripts / 108 \\
                 7.1 ISCII / 112 \\
                 7.2 Sinhalese / 118 \\
                 7.3 Tibetan / 119 \\
                 7.4 Conjunct Letters / 121 \\
                 8. Character Sets for South East Asian Scripts / 122
                 \\
                 8.1 Burmese / 122 \\
                 8.2 Khmer / 122 \\
                 8.3 Tai Scripts / 124 \\
                 9. Character Sets for East Asian Scripts / 128 \\
                 9.1 Chinese Script / 129 \\
                 9.2 Other Scripts of China / 122 \\
                 9.3 Korean Script / 124 \\
                 9.4 Japanese Script / 126 \\
                 10. Multiple-byte Coded Character Sets for East Asian
                 Scripts / 138 \\
                 10.1 Japan and its Influence on Other National
                 Standards / 138 \\
                 10.2 Korea / 142 \\
                 10.3 China / 44 \\
                 10.4 Taiwan / 146 \\
                 10.5 Handling of Variant Forms in CCCII / 148 \\
                 11. International Standardization of Multiple-byte
                 Coded Character Sets / 150 \\
                 11.1 REACC / 150 \\
                 11.2 EACC / 150 \\
                 11.3 Layers in EACC / 125 \\
                 11.4 An ISO/TC46 Multiple-byte Character Set / 157 \\
                 11.5 The IS0/TC97 Multiple-byte Character Set / 157 \\
                 11.6 Non-locking shifts / 160 \\
                 11.7 Locking shifts / 162 \\
                 11.8 Multiple-byte code extension for bibliographic
                 needs / 162 \\
                 11.9 Registration issues / 164 \\
                 12. Convergence of Interests in Character Set
                 Standardization / 165",
}

@Book{Cline:1999:CF,
  author =       "Marshall Cline and Greg Lomow and Mike Girou",
  title =        "{C++ FAQs}",
  publisher =    pub-AW,
  address =      pub-AW:adr,
  pages =        "xxxiii + 587",
  year =         "1999",
  ISBN =         "0-201-30983-1",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-201-30983-6",
  LCCN =         "QA76.73.C153C55 1999",
  bibdate =      "Tue May 11 07:03:19 1999",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  price =        "US\$39.95",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  libnote =      "Not in my library.",
}

@Article{Clinger:floating-point-input,
  author =       "William D. Clinger",
  title =        "How to Read Floating Point Numbers Accurately",
  journal =      j-SIGPLAN,
  volume =       "25",
  number =       "6",
  pages =        "92--101",
  month =        jun,
  year =         "1990",
  bibdate =      "Sun May 2 07:47:01 1999",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  note =         "See also output algorithm in
                 \cite{Steele:floating-point-output} and
                 \cite{Knuth:1990:SPW}.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Close:2015:HLD,
  author =       "Frank E. Close",
  title =        "Half-life: the divided life of {Bruno Pontecorvo},
                 physicist or spy",
  publisher =    pub-BASIC-BOOKS,
  address =      pub-BASIC-BOOKS:adr,
  pages =        "xix + 378",
  year =         "2015",
  ISBN =         "0-465-06998-3 (hardcover), 0-465-04487-5 (e-book),
                 1-78074-582-6 (e-book)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-465-06998-9 (hardcover), 978-0-465-04487-0
                 (e-book), 978-1-78074-582-4 (e-book)",
  LCCN =         "QC774.P66 C56 2014",
  bibdate =      "Thu Mar 5 05:45:53 MST 2015",
  bibsource =    "fsz3950.oclc.org:210/WorldCat;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/bibnet/authors/f/fermi-enrico.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/einstein.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/physperspect.bib",
  price =        "US\$29.99",
  abstract =     "Bruno Pontecorvo dedicated his career to hunting for
                 the Higgs boson of his day --- the neutrino, a nearly
                 massless particle considered essential to the process
                 of nuclear fission. His work on the Manhattan Project
                 under Enrico Fermi confirmed his reputation as a
                 brilliant physicist and helped usher in the nuclear
                 age. He should have won a Nobel Prize, but late in the
                 summer of 1950 he vanished. At the height of the Cold
                 War, Pontecorvo had disappeared behind the Iron
                 Curtain. In \booktitle{Half-Life}, physicist and
                 historian Frank Close offers a heretofore untold
                 history of Pontecorvo's life, based on unprecedented
                 access to his friends, family, and colleagues. With all
                 the elements of a Cold War thriller --- classified
                 atomic research, an infamous double agent, a kidnapping
                 by Soviet operatives --- \booktitle{Half-Life} is a
                 history of particle physics at perhaps its most
                 powerful: when it created the bomb.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  subject =      "Pontekorvo, Bruno (1913--1993); nuclear physicists;
                 Soviet Union; biography; Italy; spies",
  subject-dates = "1913--1993",
  tableofcontents = "Preface / ix \\
                 Prologue: Midway on life's journey / xi \\
                 First half \\
                 1: From Pisa to Rome / 3 \\
                 2: Slow neutrons and fast reactions: 1934--1936 / 12
                 \\
                 3: Paris and politics: 1936--1940 / 28 \\
                 4: The first escape: 1940 / 53 \\
                 5: Neutrons for oil and war: 1940--1941 / 66 \\
                 6: East and West: 1941--1942 / 77 \\
                 7: The pile at Chalk River: 1943--1945 / 87 \\
                 8: Physics in the open: 1945--1948 / 105 \\
                 9: Maneuvers: 1945--1950 / 117 \\
                 Interlude \\
                 West to East / 127 \\
                 Half time\\
                 10: Chain reaction: 1949--1950 / 147 \\
                 11: From Abingdon --- to where?: 1950 / 160 \\
                 12: The dear departed: 1950 / 180 \\
                 13: The MI5 letters / 200 \\
                 Second half \\
                 14: In dark woods / 213 \\
                 15: Exile / 225 \\
                 16: Resurrection / 243 \\
                 17: Mr. Neutrino / 253 \\
                 18: Private Bruno / 275 \\
                 Afterlife \\
                 19: The right road lost / 299 \\
                 Afterword / 307 \\
                 Acknowledgments / 315 \\
                 Acronyms / 318 \\
                 Notes / 319 \\
                 Bibliography / 363 \\
                 Index / 367",
}

@Book{Cody:1980:SME,
  author =       "William J. {Cody, Jr.} and William Waite",
  title =        "Software Manual for the Elementary Functions",
  publisher =    pub-PH,
  address =      pub-PH:adr,
  pages =        "x + 269",
  year =         "1980",
  ISBN =         "0-13-822064-6",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-13-822064-8",
  LCCN =         "QA331 .C635 1980",
  bibdate =      "Tue Dec 14 23:28:38 1993",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  shorttableofcontents = "Preface / ix \\
                 1. Introduction / 1 \\
                 2. Preliminaries / 3 \\
                 3. Performance Testing / 11 \\
                 4. SQRT / 17 \\
                 5. ALOG/ALOG10 / 35 \\
                 6. EXP / 60 \\
                 7. POWER (**) / 84 \\
                 8. SIN/COS / 125 \\
                 9. TAN/COT / 150 \\
                 10. ASIN/ACOS / 174 \\
                 11. ATAN/ATAN2 / 194 \\
                 12. SINH/COSH / 217",
  tableofcontents = "Preface / ix \\
                 1. Introduction / 1 \\
                 2. Preliminaries / 3 \\
                 3. Performance Testing / 11 \\
                 4. SQRT / 17 \\
                 a. General Discussion / 17 \\
                 b. Flow Chart for SQRT(X) / 18 \\
                 c. Implementation Notes, Non-Decimal Fixed-Point
                 Machines / 19 \\
                 d. Implementation Notes, Binary Floating-Point Machines
                 / 23 \\
                 e. Implementation Notes, Non-Binary Floating-Point
                 Machines / 25 \\
                 f. Testing / 28 \\
                 5. ALOG/ALOG10 / 35 \\
                 a. General Discussion / 35 \\
                 b. Flow Chart for ALOG(X)/ALOG10(X) / 37 \\
                 c. Implementation Notes, Non-Decimal Fixed-Point
                 Machines / 38 \\
                 d. Implementation Notes, Non-Decimal Floating-Point
                 Machines / 42 \\
                 e. Implementation Notes, Decimal Floating-Point
                 Machines / 46 \\
                 f. Testing / 49 \\
                 6. EXP / 60 \\
                 a. General Discussion / 60 \\
                 b. Flow Chart for EXP(X) / 62 \\
                 c. Implementation Notes, Non-Decimal Fixed-Point
                 Machines / 63 \\
                 d. Implementation Notes, Non-Decimal Floating-Point
                 Machines / 67 \\
                 e. Implementation Notes, Decimal Floating-Point
                 Machines / 71 \\
                 f. Testing / 75 \\
                 7. POWER (**) / 84 \\
                 a. General Discussion / 84 \\
                 b. Flow Chart for POWER(X,Y) / 88 \\
                 c. Implementation Notes, Non-Decimal Fixed-Point
                 Machines / 90 \\
                 d. Implementation Notes, Non-Decimal Floating-Point
                 Machines / 97 \\
                 e. Implementation Notes, Decimal Floating-Point
                 Machines / 106 \\
                 f. Testing / 113 \\
                 8. SIN/COS / 125 \\
                 a. General Discussion / 125 \\
                 b. Flow Chart for SIN(X)/COS(X) / 127 \\
                 c. Implementation Notes, Non-Decimal Fixed-Point
                 Machines / 129 \\
                 d. Implementation Notes, All Floating-Point Machines /
                 134 \\
                 e. Testing / 139 \\
                 9. TAN/COT / 150 \\
                 a. General Discussion / 150 \\
                 b. Flow Chart for TAN(X)/COTAN(X) / 152 \\
                 c. Implementation Notes, Non-Decimal Fixed-Point
                 Machines / 154 \\
                 d. Implementation Notes, All Floating-Point Machines /
                 159 \\
                 e. Testing / 164 \\
                 10. ASIN/ACOS / 174 \\
                 a. General Discuss i on / 174 \\
                 b. Flow Chart for AS IN(X)/ACOS(X) / 176 \\
                 c. Implementation Not es, Non-Decimal Fixed-Point
                 Machines / 177 \\
                 d. Implementation Notes, All Floating-Point Machines /
                 181 \\
                 e. Testing / 185 \\
                 11. ATAN/ATAN2 / 194 \\
                 a. General Discussion / 194 \\
                 b. Flow Chart for ATAN(X)/ATAN2(V,U) / 196 \\
                 c. Implementation Notes, Non-Decimal Fixed-Point
                 Machines / 198 \\
                 d. Implementation Notes, All Floating-Point Machines /
                 203 \\
                 e. Testing / 207 \\
                 12. SINH/COSH / 217 \\
                 a. General Discussion / 217 \\
                 b. Flow Chart for SINH(X)/COSH(X) / 220 \\
                 c. Implementation Notes, Non-Decimal Fixed-Point
                 Machines / 221 \\
                 d. Implementation Notes, All Floating-Point Machines /
                 225 \\
                 e. Testing / 229",
}

@Article{Cody:1984:PRW,
  author =       "William J. {Cody, Jr.} and Jerome T. Coonen and David
                 M. Gay and K. Hanson and David G. Hough and William
                 Kahan and Richard Karpinski and John F. Palmer and
                 Frederic N. Ris and David Stevenson",
  title =        "A Proposed Radix- and Word-length-independent Standard
                 for Floating-Point Arithmetic",
  journal =      j-IEEE-MICRO,
  volume =       "4",
  number =       "4",
  pages =        "86--100",
  month =        aug,
  year =         "1984",
  CODEN =        "IEMIDZ",
  DOI =          "https://doi.org/10.1109/MM.1984.291224",
  ISSN =         "0272-1732 (print), 1937-4143 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "0272-1732",
  bibdate =      "Thu Dec 14 06:08:58 MST 2000",
  bibsource =    "Compendex database;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/bibnet/authors/c/cody-william-j.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/bibnet/authors/g/gay-david-m.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/ieeemicro.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 Science Citation Index database (1980--2000)",
  acknowledgement = ack-nj # " and " # ack-nhfb,
  classcodes =   "C5230 (Digital arithmetic methods)",
  classification = "723; 902; 921",
  corpsource =   "Argonne Nat. Lab., IL, USA",
  fjournal =     "IEEE Micro",
  keywords =     "computer software; digital arithmetic; exceptions;
                 floating-point arithmetic; IEEE P854; independent
                 standard; infinity; mathematical techniques --- Digital
                 Arithmetic; NaNs; operations; precision; proposed
                 radix- and word-length-independent standard; radix
                 independent standard; rounding; standardization;
                 standards; traps; word-length-",
  subject =      "K.1 Computing Milieux, THE COMPUTER INDUSTRY,
                 Suppliers \\ G.1.0 Mathematics of Computing, NUMERICAL
                 ANALYSIS, General, Computer arithmetic",
  treatment =    "P Practical",
  xxtitle =      "A Proposed Radix-Independent and
                 Word-Length-Independent Standard for Floating-Point
                 Arithmetic",
}

@Article{Cody:fps-analysis,
  author =       "William J. {Cody, Jr.}",
  title =        "Analysis of Proposals for the Floating-Point
                 Standard",
  journal =      j-COMPUTER,
  volume =       "14",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "63--69",
  month =        mar,
  year =         "1981",
  bibdate =      "Sun May 2 07:47:15 1999",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  note =         "See \cite{IEEE:p754}.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Cohen:2010:CSH,
  author =       "Richard Cohen",
  title =        "Chasing the {Sun}: a History of the Star That Gives Us
                 Life",
  publisher =    pub-RANDOM-HOUSE,
  address =      pub-RANDOM-HOUSE:adr,
  pages =        "xxxi + 574",
  year =         "2010",
  ISBN =         "1-4000-6875-4",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-1-4000-6875-3",
  LCCN =         "QB521 .C625 2010",
  bibdate =      "Fri Nov 12 14:45:03 MST 2010",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 z3950.loc.gov:7090/Voyager",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  subject =      "Sun; history; astronomy; science and civilization",
  tableofcontents = "Sunrise: Mount Fuji \\
                 The sun before science \\
                 Telling stories \\
                 Celebrating the seasons \\
                 The three thousand witnesses \\
                 Terrors of the sky \\
                 Discovering the sun \\
                 The first astronomers \\
                 Enter the Greeks \\
                 Gifts of the Yellow Emperor \\
                 The sultan's turret \\
                 The Earth moves \\
                 Strange seas of thought \\
                 Eclipses and enlightenment \\
                 The sun dethroned \\
                 The sun on Earth \\
                 Sunspots \\
                 The qualities of light \\
                 Beneath the beating sun \\
                 Skin deep \\
                 The breath of life \\
                 The dark biosphere \\
                 Harnessing the sun \\
                 The heavenly guide \\
                 Of calendars and dials \\
                 How time goes by \\
                 The sun in our pocket \\
                 Inspired by a star \\
                 The vital symbol \\
                 Drawing on the sun \\
                 Negative capabilities \\
                 Talk of the day \\
                 Busie Old Foole \\
                 The rising star of politics \\
                 The sun and the future \\
                 Over the horizon \\
                 Under the weather \\
                 The impossible and beyond \\
                 The death of the sun \\
                 Sunset: the Ganges",
}

@Book{Cokinos:2009:FSI,
  author =       "Christopher Cokinos",
  title =        "The Fallen Sky: an Intimate History of Shooting
                 Stars",
  publisher =    "Jeremy P. Tarcher/Penguin",
  address =      "New York, NY, USA",
  pages =        "517",
  year =         "2009",
  ISBN =         "1-58542-720-9",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-1-58542-720-8",
  LCCN =         "QB755 .C65 2009",
  bibdate =      "Thu Nov 12 16:37:15 MST 2009",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 z3950.loc.gov:7090/Voyager",
  URL =          "http://www.loc.gov/catdir/enhancements/fy1001/2009017493-b.html;
                 http://www.loc.gov/catdir/enhancements/fy1001/2009017493-d.html",
  abstract =     "Weaving natural history, memoir, and the stories of
                 maverick scientists, daring adventurers, and stargazing
                 dreamers, this book takes us from Antarctica to outer
                 space to tell the tale of how the study of meteorites
                 became a scientific passion.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  subject =      "meteorites; miscellanea",
  tableofcontents = "Prologue: Dust: a brief memoir of overlooked things
                 \\
                 Distances measured in various units \\
                 What breaks out entire: the Eliza Kimberly story \\
                 Higher latitudes: in search of Peary's meteorites \\
                 The weather of belief \\
                 Mr. Barringer's big idea \\
                 Harvey Nininger sees the light \\
                 A serious case of the I wants: passions of the dealers
                 \\
                 Church of the sky \\
                 Life works: the biology of meteorites \\
                 Old fire on blue ice: an Antarctic journey \\
                 Afterword",
}

@Book{Cole:1976:MP,
  author =       "A. J. Cole",
  title =        "Macro Processors",
  volume =       "4",
  publisher =    pub-CAMBRIDGE,
  address =      pub-CAMBRIDGE:adr,
  pages =        "viii + 230",
  year =         "1976",
  ISBN =         "0-521-29024-4",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-521-29024-1",
  LCCN =         "QA76.C358",
  bibdate =      "Tue Dec 14 23:28:51 1993",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib",
  price =        "US\$7.95",
  series =       "Cambridge Computer Science Texts, Editors: E. S. Page
                 and C. M. Reeves and D. E. Conway",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
}

@Book{Coleman:1988:HMC,
  author =       "Thomas F. Coleman and Charles F. {Van Loan}",
  title =        "Handbook for Matrix Computations",
  volume =       "4",
  publisher =    pub-SIAM,
  address =      pub-SIAM:adr,
  pages =        "vii + 264",
  year =         "1988",
  DOI =          "https://doi.org/10.1137/1.9781611971040",
  ISBN =         "0-89871-227-0 (paperback), 1-61197-104-7 (e-book)",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-0-89871-227-8 (paperback), 978-1-61197-104-0
                 (e-book)",
  LCCN =         "QA188 .C651 1988",
  bibdate =      "Mon Oct 26 07:30:48 1998",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/bibnet/subjects/acc-stab-num-alg.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/fortran2.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/master.bib;
                 http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/matlab.bib",
  price =        "US\$34.00",
  series =       "Frontiers in applied mathematics",
  abstract =     "This handbook can be used as a reference by those
                 actively engaged in scientific computation. It can also
                 serve as a practical com