Valid HTML 4.0! Valid CSS!
%%% -*-BibTeX-*-
%%% ====================================================================
%%%  BibTeX-file{
%%%     author          = "Nelson H. F. Beebe",
%%%     version         = "1.00",
%%%     date            = "16 June 2017",
%%%     time            = "08:02:34 MST",
%%%     filename        = "tcps.bib",
%%%     address         = "University of Utah
%%%                        Department of Mathematics, 110 LCB
%%%                        155 S 1400 E RM 233
%%%                        Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0090
%%%                        USA",
%%%     telephone       = "+1 801 581 5254",
%%%     FAX             = "+1 801 581 4148",
%%%     URL             = "http://www.math.utah.edu/~beebe",
%%%     checksum        = "50402 854 4662 44078",
%%%     email           = "beebe at math.utah.edu, beebe at acm.org,
%%%                        beebe at computer.org (Internet)",
%%%     codetable       = "ISO/ASCII",
%%%     keywords        = "ACM Transactions on Cyber-Physical Systems
%%%                        (TCPS); bibliography; BibTeX",
%%%     license         = "public domain",
%%%     supported       = "yes",
%%%     docstring       = "This is a COMPLETE BibTeX bibliography for
%%%                        ACM Transactions on Cyber-Physical Systems
%%%                        (TCPS) (CODEN ????, ISSN 2378-962X (print),
%%%                        2378-9638 (electronic)).  The journal appears
%%%                        quarterly, and publication began with volume
%%%                        1, number 1, in February 2017.
%%%
%%%                        At version 1.00, the COMPLETE journal
%%%                        coverage looked like this:
%%%
%%%                             2017 (  16)
%%%
%%%                             Article:         16
%%%
%%%                             Total entries:   16
%%%
%%%                        The journal Web page can be found at:
%%%
%%%                            http://tcps.acm.org/
%%%
%%%                        The journal table of contents page is at:
%%%
%%%                            http://dl.acm.org/pub.cfm?id=J1496
%%%                            http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2632163
%%%
%%%                        Qualified subscribers can retrieve the full
%%%                        text of recent articles in PDF form.
%%%
%%%                        The initial draft was extracted from the ACM
%%%                        Web pages.
%%%
%%%                        ACM copyrights explicitly permit abstracting
%%%                        with credit, so article abstracts, keywords,
%%%                        and subject classifications have been
%%%                        included in this bibliography wherever
%%%                        available.  Article reviews have been
%%%                        omitted, until their copyright status has
%%%                        been clarified.
%%%
%%%                        bibsource keys in the bibliography entries
%%%                        below indicate the entry originally came
%%%                        from the computer science bibliography
%%%                        archive, even though it has likely since
%%%                        been corrected and updated.
%%%
%%%                        URL keys in the bibliography point to
%%%                        World Wide Web locations of additional
%%%                        information about the entry.
%%%
%%%                        BibTeX citation tags are uniformly chosen
%%%                        as name:year:abbrev, where name is the
%%%                        family name of the first author or editor,
%%%                        year is a 4-digit number, and abbrev is a
%%%                        3-letter condensation of important title
%%%                        words. Citation tags were automatically
%%%                        generated by software developed for the
%%%                        BibNet Project.
%%%
%%%                        In this bibliography, entries are sorted in
%%%                        publication order, using ``bibsort -byvolume.''
%%%
%%%                        The checksum field above contains a CRC-16
%%%                        checksum as the first value, followed by the
%%%                        equivalent of the standard UNIX wc (word
%%%                        count) utility output of lines, words, and
%%%                        characters.  This is produced by Robert
%%%                        Solovay's checksum utility.",
%%%  }
%%% ====================================================================
@Preamble{"\input bibnames.sty" #
    "\def \TM {${}^{\sc TM}$}"
}

%%% ====================================================================
%%% Acknowledgement abbreviations:
@String{ack-nhfb = "Nelson H. F. Beebe,
                    University of Utah,
                    Department of Mathematics, 110 LCB,
                    155 S 1400 E RM 233,
                    Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0090, USA,
                    Tel: +1 801 581 5254,
                    FAX: +1 801 581 4148,
                    e-mail: \path|beebe@math.utah.edu|,
                            \path|beebe@acm.org|,
                            \path|beebe@computer.org| (Internet),
                    URL: \path|http://www.math.utah.edu/~beebe/|"}

%%% ====================================================================
%%% Journal abbreviations:
@String{j-TCPS                  = "ACM Transactions on Cyber-Physical Systems
                                  (TCPS)"}

%%% ====================================================================
%%% Bibliography entries:
@Article{Kuo:2017:I,
  author =       "Tei Kuo",
  title =        "Introduction",
  journal =      j-TCPS,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "1e:1--1e:1",
  month =        feb,
  year =         "2017",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "https://doi.org/10.1145/3047402",
  ISSN =         "2378-962X (print), 2378-9638 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2378-9638",
  bibdate =      "Fri Jun 16 05:43:55 MDT 2017",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/tcps.bib",
  URL =          "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=3047402",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "1e",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Cyber-Physical Systems",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/pub.cfm?id=J1536",
}

@Article{Stankovic:2017:RDC,
  author =       "John A. Stankovic",
  title =        "Research Directions for Cyber Physical Systems in
                 Wireless and Mobile Healthcare",
  journal =      j-TCPS,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "1:1--1:12",
  month =        feb,
  year =         "2017",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "https://doi.org/10.1145/2899006",
  ISSN =         "2378-962X (print), 2378-9638 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2378-9638",
  bibdate =      "Fri Jun 16 05:43:55 MDT 2017",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/tcps.bib",
  URL =          "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2899006",
  abstract =     "Wireless and mobile healthcare systems are
                 proliferating. Many of these systems are Cyber Physical
                 Systems (CPS). However, the complexities involved in
                 building healthcare systems often go beyond those CPS
                 systems that are constructed using principles from
                 physics and other natural physical sciences. In
                 healthcare CPSs, complex human physiology and free
                 will, both of which are person dependent, are
                 paramount. These complexities give rise to many new
                 research problems for CPS. This article highlights some
                 of the major new research questions and promising
                 directions for wireless and mobile healthcare CPSs of
                 the future.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "1",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Cyber-Physical Systems",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/pub.cfm?id=J1536",
}

@Article{Wu:2017:DRW,
  author =       "Jianjia Wu and Wei Zhao",
  title =        "Design and Realization of {WInternet}: From Net of
                 Things to {Internet of Things}",
  journal =      j-TCPS,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "2:1--2:12",
  month =        feb,
  year =         "2017",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "https://doi.org/10.1145/2872332",
  ISSN =         "2378-962X (print), 2378-9638 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2378-9638",
  bibdate =      "Fri Jun 16 05:43:55 MDT 2017",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/tcps.bib",
  URL =          "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2872332",
  abstract =     "In recent years, Internet of Things (IoT) has
                 attracted great attention from academia, industry, and
                 government. IoT is considered to be a networking
                 infrastructure that can connect enormous physical
                 objects and has great potential to extend mankind's
                 capabilities in monitoring, analyzing, and controlling
                 the physical space using cyber technologies. Extensive
                 studies on IoT have been carried out and many IoT
                 prototype systems have been built. However, most of
                 these systems are usually suitable for domain-specific
                 applications and operate in a local region. They are
                 really Nets of Things (NoT) as they miss mechanisms for
                 large-scale interconnection. As such, how to build a
                 globally interconnected IoT is still an open problem.
                 In this article, by reviewing the development of the
                 Internet, we derive a pathway that may lead to
                 successful development and deployment of a global IoT.
                 We propose and examine a novel IoT architecture,
                 namely, WInternet, which aims at interconnecting
                 small-scale domain-specific NoTs into a globally
                 connected IoT.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "2",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Cyber-Physical Systems",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/pub.cfm?id=J1536",
}

@Article{Lee:2017:FLC,
  author =       "Edward A. Lee",
  title =        "Fundamental Limits of Cyber-Physical Systems
                 Modeling",
  journal =      j-TCPS,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "3:1--3:26",
  month =        feb,
  year =         "2017",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "https://doi.org/10.1145/2912149",
  ISSN =         "2378-962X (print), 2378-9638 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2378-9638",
  bibdate =      "Fri Jun 16 05:43:55 MDT 2017",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/tcps.bib",
  URL =          "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2912149",
  abstract =     "This article examines the role of modeling in the
                 engineering of cyber-physical systems. It argues that
                 the role that models play in engineering is different
                 from the role they play in science, and that this
                 difference should direct us to use a different class of
                 models, where simplicity and clarity of semantics
                 dominate over accuracy and detail. I argue that
                 determinism in models used for engineering is a
                 valuable property and should be preserved whenever
                 possible, regardless of whether the system being
                 modeled is deterministic. I then identify three classes
                 of fundamental limits on modeling, specifically chaotic
                 behavior, the inability of computers to numerically
                 handle a continuum, and the incompleteness of
                 determinism. The last of these has profound
                 consequences.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "3",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Cyber-Physical Systems",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/pub.cfm?id=J1536",
}

@Article{Zhang:2017:HMI,
  author =       "Desheng Zhang and Juanjuan Zhao and Fan Zhang and Tian
                 He and Haengju Lee and Sang H. Son",
  title =        "Heterogeneous Model Integration for Multi-Source Urban
                 Infrastructure Data",
  journal =      j-TCPS,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "1",
  pages =        "4:1--4:26",
  month =        feb,
  year =         "2017",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "https://doi.org/10.1145/2967503",
  ISSN =         "2378-962X (print), 2378-9638 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2378-9638",
  bibdate =      "Fri Jun 16 05:43:55 MDT 2017",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/tcps.bib",
  URL =          "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2967503",
  abstract =     "Data-driven modeling usually suffers from data
                 sparsity, especially for large-scale modeling for urban
                 phenomena based on single-source urban-infrastructure
                 data under fine-grained spatial-temporal contexts. To
                 address this challenge, we motivate, design, and
                 implement UrbanCPS, a cyber-physical system with
                 heterogeneous model integration, based on
                 extremely-large multi-source infrastructures in the
                 Chinese city Shenzhen, involving 42,000 vehicles, 10
                 million residents, and 16 million smartcards. Based on
                 temporal, spatial, and contextual contexts, we
                 formulate an optimization problem about how to
                 optimally integrate models based on highly diverse
                 datasets under three practical issues, that is,
                 heterogeneity of models, input data sparsity, or
                 unknown ground truth. We further propose a real-world
                 application called Speedometer, inferring real-time
                 traffic speeds in urban areas. The evaluation results
                 show that, compared to a state-of-the-art system,
                 Speedometer increases the inference accuracy by 29\% on
                 average.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "4",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Cyber-Physical Systems",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/pub.cfm?id=J1536",
}

@Article{Huang:2017:MTL,
  author =       "Zhichuan Huang and Ting Zhu and David Irwin and Aditya
                 Mishra and Daniel Menasche and Prashant Shenoy",
  title =        "Minimizing Transmission Loss in Smart Microgrids by
                 Sharing Renewable Energy",
  journal =      j-TCPS,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "5:1--5:22",
  month =        feb,
  year =         "2017",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "https://doi.org/10.1145/2823355",
  ISSN =         "2378-962X (print), 2378-9638 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2378-9638",
  bibdate =      "Fri Jun 16 05:43:56 MDT 2017",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/tcps.bib",
  URL =          "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2823355",
  abstract =     "Renewable energy (e.g., solar energy) is an attractive
                 option to provide green energy to homes. Unfortunately,
                 the intermittent nature of renewable energy results in
                 a mismatch between when these sources generate energy
                 and when homes demand it. This mismatch reduces the
                 efficiency of using harvested energy by either (i)
                 requiring batteries to store surplus energy, which
                 typically incurs 20\% energy conversion losses, or (ii)
                 using net metering to transmit surplus energy via the
                 electric grid's AC lines, which severely limits the
                 maximum percentage of renewable penetration possible.
                 In this article, we propose an alternative structure
                 where nearby homes explicitly share energy with each
                 other to balance local energy harvesting and demand in
                 microgrids. We develop a novel energy sharing approach
                 to determine which homes should share energy, and when
                 to minimize system-wide energy transmission losses in
                 the microgrid. We evaluate our approach in simulation
                 using real traces of solar energy harvesting and home
                 consumption data from a deployment in Amherst, MA. We
                 show that our system (i) reduces the energy loss on the
                 AC line by 64\% without requiring large batteries, (ii)
                 performance scales up with larger battery capacities,
                 and (iii) is robust to different energy consumption
                 patterns and energy prediction accuracy in the
                 microgrid.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "5",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Cyber-Physical Systems",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/pub.cfm?id=J1536",
}

@Article{Zhang:2017:LMT,
  author =       "Desheng Zhang and Juanjuan Zhao and Fan Zhang and
                 Ruobing Jiang and Tian He and Nikos Papanikolopoulos",
  title =        "Last-Mile Transit Service with Urban Infrastructure
                 Data",
  journal =      j-TCPS,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "6:1--6:26",
  month =        feb,
  year =         "2017",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "https://doi.org/10.1145/2823326",
  ISSN =         "2378-962X (print), 2378-9638 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2378-9638",
  bibdate =      "Fri Jun 16 05:43:56 MDT 2017",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/tcps.bib",
  URL =          "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2823326",
  abstract =     "In this article, we propose a transit service Feeder
                 to tackle the last-mile problem, that is, passengers
                 destinations lay beyond a walking distance from a
                 public transit station. Feeder utilizes
                 ridesharing-based vehicles (e.g., minibus) to deliver
                 passengers from existing transit stations to selected
                 stops closer to their destinations. We infer real-time
                 passenger demand (e.g., exiting stations and times) for
                 Feeder design by utilizing extreme-scale urban
                 infrastructures, which consist of 10 million
                 cellphones, 27 thousand vehicles, and 17 thousand
                 smartcard readers for 16 million smartcards in a
                 Chinese city, Shenzhen. Regarding these numerous
                 devices as pervasive sensors, we mine both online and
                 offline data for a two-end Feeder service: a back-end
                 Feeder server to calculate service schedules and
                 front-end customized Feeder devices in vehicles for
                 real-time schedule downloading. We implement Feeder
                 using a fleet of vehicles with customized hardware in a
                 subway station of Shenzhen by collecting data for 30
                 days. The evaluation results show that compared to the
                 ground truth, Feeder reduces last-mile distances by
                 68\% and travel time by 56\%, on average.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "6",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Cyber-Physical Systems",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/pub.cfm?id=J1536",
}

@Article{Altawy:2017:SPS,
  author =       "Riham Altawy and Amr M. Youssef",
  title =        "Security, Privacy, and Safety Aspects of Civilian
                 Drones: A Survey",
  journal =      j-TCPS,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "7:1--7:25",
  month =        feb,
  year =         "2017",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "https://doi.org/10.1145/3001836",
  ISSN =         "2378-962X (print), 2378-9638 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2378-9638",
  bibdate =      "Fri Jun 16 05:43:56 MDT 2017",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/tcps.bib",
  URL =          "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=3001836",
  abstract =     "The market for civilian unmanned aerial vehicles, also
                 known as drones, is expanding rapidly as new
                 applications are emerging to incorporate the use of
                 civilian drones in our daily lives. On one hand, the
                 convenience of offering certain services via drones is
                 attractive. On the other hand, the mere operation of
                 these airborne machines, which rely heavily on their
                 cyber capabilities, poses great threats to people and
                 property. Also, while the Federal Aviation
                 Administration NextGen project aims to integrate
                 civilian drones into the national airspace, the
                 regulation is still a work-in-progress and does not
                 cope with their threats. This article surveys the main
                 security, privacy, and safety aspects associated with
                 the use of civilian drones in the national airspace. In
                 particular, we identify both the physical and cyber
                 threats of such systems and discuss the security
                 properties required by their critical operation
                 environment. We also identify the research challenges
                 and possible future directions in the fields of
                 civilian drone security, safety, and privacy. Based on
                 our investigation, we forecast that security will be a
                 central enabling technology for the next generation of
                 civilian unmanned aerial vehicles.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "7",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Cyber-Physical Systems",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/pub.cfm?id=J1536",
}

@Article{Tan:2017:CLM,
  author =       "Rui Tan and Hoang Hai Nguyen and David K. Y. Yau",
  title =        "Collaborative Load Management with Safety Assurance in
                 Smart Grids",
  journal =      j-TCPS,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "12:1--12:27",
  month =        feb,
  year =         "2017",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "https://doi.org/10.1145/2823351",
  ISSN =         "2378-962X (print), 2378-9638 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2378-9638",
  bibdate =      "Fri Jun 16 05:43:56 MDT 2017",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/tcps.bib",
  URL =          "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2823351",
  abstract =     "Load shedding can combat the overload of a power grid
                 that may jeopardize the grid's safety. However,
                 disconnected customers may be excessively
                 inconvenienced or even endangered. With the emergence
                 of demand-response based on cyber-enabled smart meters
                 and appliances, customers may participate in solving
                 the overload by curtailing their demands
                 collaboratively such that no single customers will have
                 to bear a disproportionate burden of reduced usage.
                 However, compliance or commitment to curtailment
                 requests by untrusted users is uncertain, which causes
                 an important safety concern. This article proposes a
                 two-phase load management scheme that (i) gives
                 customers a chance to curtail their demands and correct
                 a grid's overload when there are no immediate safety
                 concerns but (ii) falls back to load shedding to ensure
                 safety once the grid enters a vulnerable state.
                 Extensive simulations based on a 37-bus electrical grid
                 and traces of real electrical load demonstrate the
                 effectiveness of this scheme. In particular, if
                 customers are, as expected, sufficiently committed to
                 the load curtailment, overloads can be resolved in real
                 time by collaborative and graceful usage degradation
                 among them, thereby avoiding unpleasant load
                 shedding.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "12",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Cyber-Physical Systems",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/pub.cfm?id=J1536",
}

@Article{He:2017:CSI,
  author =       "Liang He and Eugene Kim and Kang G. Shin",
  title =        "A Case Study on Improving Capacity Delivery of Battery
                 Packs via Reconfiguration",
  journal =      j-TCPS,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "11:1--11:23",
  month =        feb,
  year =         "2017",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "https://doi.org/10.1145/3035539",
  ISSN =         "2378-962X (print), 2378-9638 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2378-9638",
  bibdate =      "Fri Jun 16 05:43:56 MDT 2017",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/tcps.bib",
  URL =          "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=3035539",
  abstract =     "Cell imbalance in large battery packs degrades their
                 capacity delivery, especially for cells connected in
                 series where the weakest cell dominates their overall
                 capacity. In this article, we present a case study of
                 exploiting system reconfigurations to mitigate the cell
                 imbalance in battery packs. Specifically, instead of
                 using all the cells in a battery pack to support the
                 load, selectively skipping cells to be discharged may
                 actually enhance the pack's capacity delivery. Based on
                 this observation, we propose CSR, a Cell
                 Skipping-assisted Reconfiguration algorithm that
                 identifies the system configuration with (near)-optimal
                 capacity delivery. We evaluate CSR using large-scale
                 emulation based on empirically collected discharge
                 traces of 40 lithium-ion cells. CSR achieves
                 close-to-optimal capacity delivery when the cell
                 imbalance in the battery pack is low and improves the
                 capacity delivery by about 20\% and up to 1x in the
                 case of a high imbalance.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "11",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Cyber-Physical Systems",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/pub.cfm?id=J1536",
}

@Article{Irwin:2017:EDE,
  author =       "David Irwin and Srinivasan Iyengar and Stephen Lee and
                 Aditya Mishra and Prashant Shenoy and Ye Xu",
  title =        "Enabling Distributed Energy Storage by Incentivizing
                 Small Load Shifts",
  journal =      j-TCPS,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "10:1--10:30",
  month =        feb,
  year =         "2017",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "https://doi.org/10.1145/3015663",
  ISSN =         "2378-962X (print), 2378-9638 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2378-9638",
  bibdate =      "Fri Jun 16 05:43:56 MDT 2017",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/tcps.bib",
  URL =          "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=3015663",
  abstract =     "Reducing peak demands and achieving a high penetration
                 of renewable energy sources are important goals in
                 achieving a smarter grid. To reduce peak demand,
                 utilities are introducing variable rate electricity
                 prices to incentivize consumers to manually shift their
                 demand to low-price periods. Consumers may also use
                 energy storage to automatically shift their demand by
                 storing energy during low-price periods for use during
                 high-price periods. Unfortunately, variable rate
                 pricing provides only a weak incentive for distributed
                 energy storage and does not promote its adoption at
                 large scales. In this article, we present the storage
                 adoption dilemma to capture the problems with
                 incentivizing energy storage using variable rate
                 prices. To address the problem, we propose a simple
                 pricing scheme, called flat-power pricing, which
                 incentivizes consumers to shift small amounts of load
                 to flatten their demand rather than shift as much of
                 their power usage as possible to low-price, off-peak
                 periods. We show that compared to variable rate
                 pricing, flat-power pricing (i) reduces consumers
                 upfront capital costs, as it requires significantly
                 less storage capacity per consumer; (ii) increases
                 energy storage's return on investment, as it mitigates
                 free riding and maintains the incentive to use energy
                 storage at large scales; and (iii) uses aggregate
                 storage capacity within 31\% of an optimal centralized
                 approach. In addition, unlike variable rate pricing, we
                 also show that flat-power pricing incentivizes the
                 scheduling of elastic background loads, such as air
                 conditioners and heaters, to reduce peak demand. We
                 evaluate our approach using real smart meter data from
                 14,000 homes in a small town.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "10",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Cyber-Physical Systems",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/pub.cfm?id=J1536",
}

@Article{Jiang:2017:EBM,
  author =       "Jian-Min Jiang and Huibiao Zhu and Qin Li and Yongxin
                 Zhao and Lin Zhao and Shi Zhang and Ping Gong and Zhong
                 Hong and Donghuo Chen",
  title =        "Event-Based Mobility Modeling and Analysis",
  journal =      j-TCPS,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "9:1--9:32",
  month =        feb,
  year =         "2017",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "https://doi.org/10.1145/2823353",
  ISSN =         "2378-962X (print), 2378-9638 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2378-9638",
  bibdate =      "Fri Jun 16 05:43:56 MDT 2017",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/tcps.bib",
  URL =          "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2823353",
  abstract =     "Mobility is a critical issue that must be considered
                 during the modeling and analyzing of a mobile system.
                 At a high abstract level, event-based models can
                 directly specify a mobile system without the
                 introduction of additional mechanisms. In this article,
                 we first propose two types of special events, entering
                 and exiting an ambient, as movement events. Next, based
                 on the movement events, we introduce the notion of a
                 movement path and propose a feasible movement criterion
                 (deciding whether a given movement path of a mobile
                 object (agent) is feasible or not in terms of
                 spatiotemporal topological relationships of ambients).
                 Then, we investigate how a message movement--based
                 communication model represents synchronous
                 communication, asynchronous communication, and
                 broadcast communication in a unified way. Finally, we
                 use movement event sequences to discuss the exclusivity
                 of ambients (an ambient only allows one mobile object
                 to occupy (enter) it at any moment) and show that a
                 priority scheduling control policy can guarantee
                 exclusivity. Accordingly, we propose a correct movement
                 criterion that is, a correct movement path is feasible
                 and satisfies the exclusivity of ambients. Case studies
                 demonstrate these results.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "9",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Cyber-Physical Systems",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/pub.cfm?id=J1536",
}

@Article{Zimmerling:2017:ART,
  author =       "Marco Zimmerling and Luca Mottola and Pratyush Kumar
                 and Federico Ferrari and Lothar Thiele",
  title =        "Adaptive Real-Time Communication for Wireless
                 Cyber-Physical Systems",
  journal =      j-TCPS,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "2",
  pages =        "8:1--8:29",
  month =        feb,
  year =         "2017",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "https://doi.org/10.1145/3012005",
  ISSN =         "2378-962X (print), 2378-9638 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2378-9638",
  bibdate =      "Fri Jun 16 05:43:56 MDT 2017",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/tcps.bib",
  URL =          "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=3012005",
  abstract =     "Low-power wireless technology promises greater
                 flexibility and lower costs in cyber-physical systems.
                 To reap these benefits, communication protocols must
                 deliver packets reliably within real-time deadlines
                 across resource-constrained devices, while adapting to
                 changes in application requirements (e.g., traffic
                 demands) and network state (e.g., link qualities).
                 Existing protocols do not solve all these challenges
                 simultaneously, because their operation is either
                 localized or a function of network state, which changes
                 unpredictably over time. By contrast, this article
                 claims a global approach that does not use network
                 state information as input can overcome these
                 limitations. The Blink protocol proves this claim by
                 providing hard guarantees on end-to-end deadlines of
                 received packets in multi-hop low-power wireless
                 networks, while seamlessly handling changes in
                 application requirements and network state. We build
                 Blink on the non-real-time Low-Power Wireless Bus (LWB)
                 and design new scheduling algorithms based on the
                 earliest-deadline-first policy. Using a dedicated
                 priority queue data structure, we demonstrate a viable
                 implementation of our algorithms on
                 resource-constrained devices. Experiments show that
                 Blink (i) meets all deadlines of received packets, (ii)
                 delivers 99.97\% of packets on a 94-node testbed, (iii)
                 minimizes communication energy consumption within the
                 limits of the underlying LWB, (iv) supports end-to-end
                 deadlines of 100ms across four hops and nine sources,
                 and (v) runs up to $ 4.1 \times $ faster than a
                 conventional scheduler implementation on popular
                 microcontrollers.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "8",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Cyber-Physical Systems",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/pub.cfm?id=J1536",
}

@Article{Gerostathopoulos:2017:SAC,
  author =       "Ilias Gerostathopoulos and Tomas Bures and Petr
                 Hnetynka and Adam Hujecek and Frantisek Plasil and
                 Dominik Skoda",
  title =        "Strengthening Adaptation in Cyber-Physical Systems via
                 Meta-Adaptation Strategies",
  journal =      j-TCPS,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "13:1--13:25",
  month =        may,
  year =         "2017",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "https://doi.org/10.1145/2823345",
  ISSN =         "2378-962X (print), 2378-9638 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2378-9638",
  bibdate =      "Fri Jun 16 05:43:56 MDT 2017",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/tcps.bib",
  URL =          "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2823345",
  abstract =     "The dynamic nature of complex Cyber-Physical Systems
                 puts extra requirements on their functionalities: they
                 not only need to be dependable, but also able to adapt
                 to changing situations in their environment. When
                 developing such systems, however, it is often
                 impossible to explicitly design for all potential
                 situations up front and provide corresponding
                 strategies. Situations that come out of this envelope
                 of adaptability can lead to problems that end up by
                 applying an emergency fail-safe strategy to avoid
                 complete system failure. The existing approaches to
                 self-adaptation cannot typically cope with such
                 situations better while they are adaptive (and can
                 apply learning) in choosing a strategy, they still rely
                 on a pre-defined set of strategies not flexible enough
                 to deal with those situations adequately. To alleviate
                 this problem, we propose the concept of meta-adaptation
                 strategies, which extends the limits of adaptability of
                 a system by constructing new strategies at runtime to
                 reflect the changes in the environment. Though the
                 approach is generally applicable to most approaches to
                 self-adaptation, we demonstrate our approach on IRM-SA
                 a design method and associated runtime model for
                 self-adaptive distributed systems based on component
                 ensembles. We exemplify the meta-adaptation strategies
                 concept by providing three concrete meta-adaptation
                 strategies and show its feasibility on an emergency
                 coordination case study.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "13",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Cyber-Physical Systems",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/pub.cfm?id=J1536",
}

@Article{Khandeparkar:2017:QDD,
  author =       "Kedar Khandeparkar and Krithi Ramamritham and Rajeev
                 Gupta",
  title =        "{QoS}-Driven Data Processing Algorithms for Smart
                 Electric Grids",
  journal =      j-TCPS,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "14:1--14:24",
  month =        may,
  year =         "2017",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "https://doi.org/10.1145/3047410",
  ISSN =         "2378-962X (print), 2378-9638 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2378-9638",
  bibdate =      "Fri Jun 16 05:43:56 MDT 2017",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/tcps.bib",
  URL =          "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=3047410",
  abstract =     "Smart-grid applications have widely varying data needs
                 as well as bandwidth and latency requirements. The
                 usual approach to accumulating the available data
                 (e.g., from Phasor Measurement Units) at a centralized
                 site and executing all the applications there leads to
                 large network latencies. This article proposes
                 techniques where data packets are prioritized and
                 disseminated based on applications data needs and
                 semantics. In particular, these techniques
                 systematically exploit in-network processing capability
                 and filter data in the dissemination network. This
                 filtered data is assigned higher priority compared to
                 the raw unfiltered data helping meet QoS requirements
                 of various applications. Performance evaluation of our
                 distributed techniques over a testbed designed for the
                 Indian electric grid demonstrates that processing
                 latency for various smart grid applications reduces by
                 at least 50\% for large PMU data sizes, compared to the
                 traditional centralized approach.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "14",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Cyber-Physical Systems",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/pub.cfm?id=J1536",
}

@Article{Park:2017:SCP,
  author =       "Junkil Park and Radoslav Ivanov and James Weimer and
                 Miroslav Pajic and Sang Hyuk Son and Insup Lee",
  title =        "Security of Cyber-Physical Systems in the Presence of
                 Transient Sensor Faults",
  journal =      j-TCPS,
  volume =       "1",
  number =       "3",
  pages =        "15:1--15:23",
  month =        may,
  year =         "2017",
  CODEN =        "????",
  DOI =          "https://doi.org/10.1145/3064809",
  ISSN =         "2378-962X (print), 2378-9638 (electronic)",
  ISSN-L =       "2378-9638",
  bibdate =      "Fri Jun 16 05:43:56 MDT 2017",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/tcps.bib",
  URL =          "http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=3064809",
  abstract =     "This article is concerned with the security of modern
                 Cyber-Physical Systems in the presence of transient
                 sensor faults. We consider a system with multiple
                 sensors measuring the same physical variable, where
                 each sensor provides an interval with all possible
                 values of the true state. We note that some sensors
                 might output faulty readings and others may be
                 controlled by a malicious attacker. Differing from
                 previous works, in this article, we aim to distinguish
                 between faults and attacks and develop an attack
                 detection algorithm for the latter only. To do this, we
                 note that there are two kinds of faults transient and
                 permanent; the former are benign and short-lived,
                 whereas the latter may have dangerous consequences on
                 system performance. We argue that sensors have an
                 underlying transient fault model that quantifies the
                 amount of time in which transient faults can occur. In
                 addition, we provide a framework for developing such a
                 model if it is not provided by manufacturers. Attacks
                 can manifest as either transient or permanent faults
                 depending on the attacker's goal. We provide different
                 techniques for handling each kind. For the former, we
                 analyze the worst-case performance of sensor fusion
                 over time given each sensor's transient fault model and
                 develop a filtered fusion interval that is guaranteed
                 to contain the true value and is bounded in size. To
                 deal with attacks that do not comply with sensors
                 transient fault models, we propose a sound attack
                 detection algorithm based on pairwise inconsistencies
                 between sensor measurements. Finally, we provide a
                 real-data case study on an unmanned ground vehicle to
                 evaluate the various aspects of this article.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  articleno =    "15",
  fjournal =     "ACM Transactions on Cyber-Physical Systems",
  journal-URL =  "http://dl.acm.org/pub.cfm?id=J1536",
}